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Basic science and research
Role of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Sepsis
Harsha Nagar, Shuyu Piao, Cuk-Seong Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(2):65-72.   Published online May 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00157
  • 7,361 View
  • 388 Download
  • 43 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Mitochondria are considered the power house of the cell and are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, serving as the primary site for adenosine triphosphate production via oxidative phosphorylation. These organelles also release reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are normal byproducts of metabolism at physiological levels; however, overproduction of ROS under pathophysiological conditions is considered part of a disease process, as in sepsis. The inflammatory response inherent in sepsis initiates changes in normal mitochondrial functions that may result in organ damage. There is a complex system of interacting antioxidant defenses that normally function to combat oxidative stress and prevent damage to the mitochondria. It is widely accepted that oxidative stress-mediated injury plays an important role in the development of organ failure; however, conclusive evidence of any beneficial effect of systemic antioxidant supplementation in patients with sepsis and organ dysfunction is lacking. Nevertheless, it has been suggested that antioxidant therapy delivered specifically to the mitochondria may be useful.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Inflammation.2022; 45(3): 1374.     CrossRef
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    Cell Death & Disease.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Journal of Clinical Nephrology.2022; 6(1): 001.     CrossRef
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  • Landscape of Metabolic Fingerprinting for Diagnosis and Risk Stratification of Sepsis
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    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    The Nurse Practitioner.2022; 47(11): 24.     CrossRef
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  • P66Shc (Shc1) Zebrafish Mutant Line as a Platform for Testing Decreased Reactive Oxygen Species in Pathology
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    Pediatric Research.2021; 90(5): 1016.     CrossRef
  • Polymeric Antioxidant Materials for Treatment of Inflammatory Disorders
    Jiwon Yeo, Junseok Lee, Sanggi Lee, Won Jong Kim
    Advanced Therapeutics.2021; 4(4): 2000270.     CrossRef
  • Pathophysiology of sepsis
    Pietro Arina, Mervyn Singer
    Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology.2021; 34(2): 77.     CrossRef
  • Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Sepsis and Acute Inflammation
    Jérémie Joffre, Judith Hellman
    Antioxidants & Redox Signaling.2021; 35(15): 1291.     CrossRef
  • The Prospects of Succinates’ Use under Hypoxic Conditions in COVID-19
    Yu. Р. Orlov, V. V. Afanasyev, I. A. Khilenko
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    Frontiers in Physiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2021; 22(22): 12345.     CrossRef
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    Zichen Song, Leilei Meng, Zhixiang He, Jing Huang, Fang Li, Jingjing Feng, Zhuoran Jia, Yue Huang, Wei Liu, Anding Liu, Haoshu Fang
    Shock.2021; 56(6): 1066.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Inflammation Research.2021; Volume 14: 6349.     CrossRef
  • Immunomodulatory Effect of Doxycycline Ameliorates Systemic and Pulmonary Inflammation in a Murine Polymicrobial Sepsis Model
    Anasuya Patel, Hemant Khande, Hariharan Periasamy, Santosh Mokale
    Inflammation.2020; 43(3): 1035.     CrossRef
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    Jesús Beltrán-García, Rebeca Osca-Verdegal, Federico V. Pallardó, José Ferreres, María Rodríguez, Sandra Mulet, Fabian Sanchis-Gomar, Nieves Carbonell, José Luis García-Giménez
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    The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases.2020; 24(6): 552.     CrossRef
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    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Surgery
Reducing Unnecessary Testing in the Intensive Care Unit by Choosing Wisely
Ruth M. Kleinpell, J. Christopher Farmer, Stephen M. Pastores
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(1):1-6.   Published online February 28, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00052
  • 15,554 View
  • 518 Download
  • 10 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Overuse of laboratory and X-ray testing is common in the intensive care unit (ICU). This review highlights focused strategies for critical care clinicians as outlined by the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) as part of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation’s Choosing Wisely® campaign. The campaign aims to promote the use of judicious testing and decrease unnecessary treatment measures in the ICU. The CCSC outlines five specific recommendations for reducing unnecessary testing in the ICU. First, reduce the use of daily or regular interval diagnostic testing. Second, do not transfuse red blood cells in hemodynamically stable, non-bleeding ICU patients with a hemoglobin concentration greater than 7 mg/dl. Third, do not use parenteral nutrition in adequately nourished critically ill patients within the first 7 days of ICU stay. Fourth, do not deeply sedate mechanically ventilated patients without a specific indication and without daily attempts to lighten sedation. Finally, do not continue life support for patients at high risk of death without offering patients and their families the alternative of comfort focused care. A number of strategies can be used to reduce unnecessary testing in the ICU, including educational campaigns, audit and feedback, and implementing prompts in the electronic ordering system to allow only acceptable indications when ordering routine testing. Greater awareness of the lack of outcome benefit and associated costs can prompt clinicians to be more mindful of ordering tests and procedures in order to reduce unnecessary testing in the ICU.

Citations

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  • What blood conservation practices are effective at reducing blood sampling volumes and other clinical sequelae in intensive care? A systematic review
    Samantha Keogh, Saira Mathew, Amanda J. Ullman, Claire M. Rickard, Fiona Coyer
    Australian Critical Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Maxwell C. Braasch, Bachar N. Halimeh, Christopher A. Guidry
    Surgical Infections.2022; 23(2): 178.     CrossRef
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    Journal of Asthma.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Blood Sampling on Anemia in the PICU: A Prospective Cohort Study
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    Camilo E Valderrama, Daniel J Niven, Henry T Stelfox, Joon Lee
    JMIR Medical Informatics.2022; 10(6): e35250.     CrossRef
  • Implementation and Impact of Choosing Wisely Recommendations in Oncology
    Sonieya Nagarajah, Melanie Lynn Powis, Rouhi Fazelzad, Monika K. Krzyzanowska, Vishal Kukreti
    JCO Oncology Practice.2022; 18(10): 703.     CrossRef
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    Transfusion.2020; 60(2): 256.     CrossRef
  • Audit and feedback to improve laboratory test and transfusion ordering in critical care: a systematic review
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    Implementation Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Medizinische Klinik - Intensivmedizin und Notfallmedizin.2020; 115(7): 539.     CrossRef
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    Sirak Petros, Lorenz Weidhase
    Wiener klinisches Magazin.2020; 23(6): 298.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Patient-Ventilator Dyssynchrony
Elvira-Markela Antonogiannaki, Dimitris Georgopoulos, Evangelia Akoumianaki
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(4):307-322.   Published online November 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00535
  • 30,994 View
  • 1,940 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
In mechanically ventilated patients, assisted mechanical ventilation (MV) is employed early, following the acute phase of critical illness, in order to eliminate the detrimental effects of controlled MV, most notably the development of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction. Nevertheless, the benefits of assisted MV are often counteracted by the development of patient-ventilator dyssynchrony. Patient-ventilator dyssynchrony occurs when either the initiation and/or termination of mechanical breath is not in time agreement with the initiation and termination of neural inspiration, respectively, or if the magnitude of mechanical assist does not respond to the patient’s respiratory demand. As patient-ventilator dyssynchrony has been associated with several adverse effects and can adversely influence patient outcome, every effort should be made to recognize and correct this occurrence at bedside. To detect patient-ventilator dyssynchronies, the physician should assess patient comfort and carefully inspect the pressure- and flow-time waveforms, available on the ventilator screen of all modern ventilators. Modern ventilators offer several modifiable settings to improve patient-ventilator interaction. New proportional modes of ventilation are also very helpful in improving patient-ventilator interaction.

Citations

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  • Effects of Neurally Adjusted Ventilation Assist (NAVA) and conventional modes of mechanical ventilation on diaphragm functions: A randomized controlled trial
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    Heart & Lung.2022; 53: 36.     CrossRef
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Basic science and research
The Role of Oliguria and the Absence of Fluid Administration and Balance Information in Illness Severity Scores
Neil J. Glassford, Rinaldo Bellomo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(2):106-123.   Published online May 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00192
  • 10,952 View
  • 288 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Urinary examination has formed part of patient assessment since the earliest days of medicine. Current definitions of oliguria are essentially arbitrary, but duration and intensity of oliguria have been associated with an increased risk of mortality, and this risk is not completely attributable to the development of concomitant acute kidney injury (AKI) as defined by changes in serum creatinine concentration. The increased risk of death associated with the development of AKI itself may be modified by directly or indirectly by progressive fluid accumulation, due to reduced elimination and increased fluid administration. None of the currently extant major illness severity scoring systems or outcome prediction models use modern definitions of AKI or oliguria, or any values representative of fluid volumes variables. Even if a direct relationship with mortality is not observed, then it is possible that fluid balance or fluid volume variables mediate the relationship between illness severity and mortality in the renal and respiratory physiological domains. Fluid administration and fluid balance may then be an important, easily modifiable therapeutic target for future investigation. These relationships require exploration in large datasets before being prospectively validated in groups of critically ill patients from differing jurisdictions to improve prognostication and mortality prediction.

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  • Management of oliguria
    Marlies Ostermann, Andrew D. Shaw, Michael Joannidis
    Intensive Care Medicine.2023; 49(1): 103.     CrossRef
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    Shao-Yu Yang, Terry Ting-Yu Chiou, Chih-Chung Shiao, Hugo You-Hsien Lin, Ming-Jen Chan, Che-Hsiung Wu, Chiao-Yin Sun, Wei-Jie Wang, Yen-Ta Huang, Vin-Cent Wu, Yung-Chang Chen, Ji-Tsung Fang, Shang-Jyh Hwang, Heng-Chih Pan
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    Neil G. Docherty, Christian Delles, Patrick D’Haese, Anita T. Layton, Carlos Martínez-Salgado, Benjamin A. Vervaet, Francisco J. López-Hernández
    Ageing Research Reviews.2021; 70: 101408.     CrossRef
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    Neil J. Glassford, Rinaldo Bellomo
    Critical Care Clinics.2018; 34(2): 279.     CrossRef
Status Epilepticus and Beyond: A Clinical Review of Status Epilepticus and an Update on Current Management Strategies in Super-refractory Status Epilepticus
Roy Poblete, Gene Sung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(2):89-105.   Published online May 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00252
  • 22,287 View
  • 1,907 Download
  • 5 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Status epilepticus and refractory status epilepticus represent some of the most complex conditions encountered in the neurological intensive care unit. Challenges in management are common as treatment options become limited and prolonged hospital courses are accompanied by complications and worsening patient outcomes. Antiepileptic drug treatments have become increasingly complex. Rational polytherapy should consider the pharmacodynamics and kinetics of medications. When seizures cannot be controlled with medical therapy, alternative treatments, including early surgical evaluation can be considered; however, evidence is limited. This review provides a brief overview of status epilepticus, and a recent update on the management of refractory status epilepticus based on evidence from the literature, evidence-based guidelines, and experiences at our institution.

Citations

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  • Proanthocyanidin from Vitis vinifera attenuates memory impairment due to convulsive status epilepticus
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Cardiology
Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Hyoung Soo Kim, Sunghoon Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):22-28.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00983
  • 18,785 View
  • 674 Download
  • 8 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs)/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation without allogeneic blood transfusion: An observational cohort study
    Alison Grazioli, Michael Plazak, Siamak Dahi, Joseph Rabin, Ashley Menne, Mehrdad Ghoreishi, Bradley Taylor, Seth Perelman, Michael Mazzeffi
    Perfusion.2022; : 026765912211190.     CrossRef
  • A value-based approach to optimize red blood cell transfusion in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Yasuhiro Shudo, Nathalie Cheng, Hao He, Corinne Rosenberg, William Hiesinger, Eric Hadhazy, John Shepard, Purnima Krishna, Josh Resnik, Robyn Fong, Charles Hill, Joe L Hsu, Paul M Maggio, Sang-Ick Chang, Jack H Boyd, Y Joseph Woo
    Perfusion.2022; : 026765912211281.     CrossRef
  • Neonatal extra corporeal membrane oxygenation
    Suneel Kumar Pooboni
    Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.2021; 37(4): 411.     CrossRef
  • Point-of-care testing of plasma free hemoglobin and hematocrit for mechanical circulatory support
    Dong Ah Shin, Jung Chan Lee, Heean Shin, Young-Jae Cho, Hee Chan Kim
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical effectiveness of point-of-care testing for anticoagulation management during ECMO
    Federica Jiritano, Dario Fina, Roberto Lorusso, Hugo ten Cate, Mariusz Kowalewski, Matteo Matteucci, Raffaele Serra, Pasquale Mastroroberto, Giuseppe Filiberto Serraino
    Journal of Clinical Anesthesia.2021; 73: 110330.     CrossRef
  • Blood transfusion strategies and ECMO during the COVID-19 pandemic
    David Koeckerling, Daniel Pan, N Lakmal Mudalige, Oluwatobiloba Oyefeso, Joseph Barker
    The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.2020; 8(5): e40.     CrossRef
  • Life-threatening antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitis after influenza A H1N1 infection requiring veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Frantzeska G. Frantzeskaki, Stavros Dimopoulos, Dimitrios Konstantonis, Pelagia Katsibri, Kostantinos Kostopanagiotou, Maria Theodorakopoulou, Chrysi Diakaki, Dimitrios Dougenis, Dimitrios Boumpas, Andreas Karabinis, Apostolos Armaganidis, Iraklis Tsangar
    Perfusion.2020; 35(6): 546.     CrossRef
  • Case Report: Successful Use of Extracorporeal Therapies After ECMO Resuscitation in a Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipient
    Andrey Rybalko, Anna Pytal, Mikhail Kaabak, Nadejda Rappoport, Anuar Bidzhiev, Vasilii Lastovka
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Surgery
Management of Critical Burn Injuries: Recent Developments
David J. Dries, John J. Marini
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):9-21.   Published online February 17, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00969
  • 24,425 View
  • 1,514 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Burn injury and its subsequent multisystem effects are commonly encountered by acute care practitioners. Resuscitation is the major component of initial burn care and must be managed to restore and preserve vital organ function. Later complications of burn injury are dominated by infection. Burn centers are often called to manage problems related to thermal injury, including lightning and electrical injuries.
Methods
A selected review is provided of key management concepts as well as of recent reports published by the American Burn Association.
Results
The burn-injured patient is easily and frequently over resuscitated, with ensuing complications that include delayed wound healing and respiratory compromise. A feedback protocol designed to limit the occurrence of excessive resuscitation has been proposed, but no new “gold standard” for resuscitation has replaced the venerated Parkland formula. While new medical therapies have been proposed for patients sustaining inhalation injury, a paradigm-shifting standard of medical therapy has not emerged. Renal failure as a specific contributor to adverse outcome in burns has been reinforced by recent data. Of special problems addressed in burn centers, electrical injuries pose multisystem physiologic challenges and do not fit typical scoring systems.
Conclusion
Recent reports emphasize the dangers of over resuscitation in the setting of burn injury. No new medical therapy for inhalation injury has been generally adopted, but new standards for description of burn-related infections have been presented. The value of the burn center in care of the problems of electrical exposure, both manmade and natural, is demonstrated in recent reports.

Citations

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  • SUBMICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN THE HEMOCAPILLARIES OF THE CEREBRAL HEMISCLE CAUSES CAUSED BY THERMAL BURN
    H. V. Lukyantseva, V. A. Pastukhova, O. I. Kovalchuk
    Bulletin of Problems Biology and Medicine.2021; 3(1): 268.     CrossRef
  • Kefir Accelerates Burn Wound Healing Through Inducing Fibroblast Cell Migration In Vitro and Modulating the Expression of IL-1ß, TGF-ß1, and bFGF Genes In Vivo
    Ahmad Oryan, Esmat Alemzadeh, Mohammad Hadi Eskandari
    Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins.2019; 11(3): 874.     CrossRef
  • Viable placental allograft as a biological dressing in the clinical management of full-thickness thermal occupational burns
    Eric L. Johnson, Elisabet K. Tassis, Georgina M. Michael, Susan G. Whittinghill
    Medicine.2017; 96(49): e9045.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Lung Ultrasound (in the Critically Ill) Superior to CT: the Example of Lung Sliding
Daniel A. Lichtenstein
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):1-8.   Published online February 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00955
  • 16,628 View
  • 819 Download
  • 9 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
This review article shows the potential of lung ultrasound in the critically ill (LUCI) to study lung sliding and describes the optimal equipment for its assessment. Then, it analyses the integration of lung sliding within lung ultrasound then whole body critical ultrasound. It describes the place of lung sliding in the BLUE-protocol (bedside lung ultrasound in emergency) (lung and venous ultrasound for diagnosing acute respiratory failure), the FALLS-protocol (fluid administration limited by lung sonography) (the role of lung sliding in circulatory failure), and the SESAME-protocol (sequential assessment of sonography assessing mechanism or origin of severe shock of indistinct cause) (whole body ultrasound in cardiac arrest). In the LUCIFLR project (LUCI favoring limitation of radiations), the consideration of lung sliding allows drastic reduction in irradiation and costs. In conclusion, lung sliding is proposed as a gold standard for indicating the presence of the lung at the chest wall and its correct expansion.

Citations

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  • Early detection of delayed pneumothorax using lung ultrasound after transthoracic needle lung biopsy: A prospective pilot study
    Jeong Suk Koh, Chaeuk Chung, Ju Ock Kim, Sung Soo Jung, Hee Sun Park, Jeong Eun Lee, Da Hyun Kang, Yoonjoo Kim, Dongil Park
    The Clinical Respiratory Journal.2022; 16(5): 413.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of Lung Ultrasound Follow‐up in Patients Who Have Recovered From Coronavirus Disease 2019
    Yale Tung‐Chen, Milagros Martí de Gracia, Maria Luz Parra‐Gordo, Aurea Díez‐Tascón, Sergio Agudo‐Fernández, Silvia Ossaba‐Vélez
    Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.2021; 40(9): 1971.     CrossRef
  • The role of lung ultrasound in COVID-19 disease
    Dirk-André Clevert, Paul S. Sidhu, Adrian Lim, Caroline Ewertsen, Vladimir Mitkov, Maciej Piskunowicz, Paolo Ricci, Núria Bargallo, Adrian P. Brady
    Insights into Imaging.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Acute Care Nephrology
    Nithin Karakala, Daniel Córdoba, Kiran Chandrashekar, Arnaldo Lopez-Ruiz, Luis A. Juncos
    Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease.2021; 28(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • YEARS Algorithm Versus Wells’ Score
    Ahmed Abdelaal Ahmed Mahmoud M. Alkhatip, Maria Donnelly, Lindi Snyman, Patrick Conroy, Mohamed Khaled Hamza, Ian Murphy, Andrew Purcell, David McGuire
    Critical Care Medicine.2020; 48(5): 704.     CrossRef
  • Sonographische Bildgebung der Lunge bei COVID-19
    M. Schmid, F. Escher, D.-A. Clevert
    Der Radiologe.2020; 60(10): 919.     CrossRef
  • Current Misconceptions in Lung Ultrasound
    Daniel A. Lichtenstein
    Chest.2019; 156(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • Role of thoracic ultrasound in children with chronic kidney disease
    SaneyaAbd El-Halim Fahmy, NaglaaAbd El-Moneam Abd Allah, AmiraI Al-Masry, Eman Sobh
    The Scientific Journal of Al-Azhar Medical Faculty, Girls.2019; 3(3): 693.     CrossRef
  • Novel approaches to ultrasonography of the lung and pleural space: where are we now?
    Daniel Lichtenstein
    Breathe.2017; 13(2): 100.     CrossRef
Cardiology/Surgery/Basic science and research
The Complexities of Intravenous Fluid Research: Questions of Scale, Volume, and Accumulation
Neil J Glassford, Rinaldo Bellomo
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(4):276-299.   Published online November 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00934
  • 17,879 View
  • 553 Download
  • 13 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite near ubiquity, information regarding fluids consumption at a health care systems level, and patient exposure at an individual level, is surprisingly limited in the medical literature. The epidemiology of the foundational medical intervention of intravenous fluid administration is incredibly complex, with millions of patients being exposed internationally every year. Fluid is being given for different reasons, to different targets, following different triggers, by different specialties in different countries, and any observations that can be made are thought to have limited external validity to other jurisdictions and patient groups. The independent effects of fluid administration and fluid accumulation are very hard to separate from other markers of illness severity and aspects of the process of care. Fluid accumulation can result in organ injury, even when the fluid is being given to purportedly ameliorate or prevent such injury, and if it were independently associated with mortality then would be an easily accessible and modifiable risk factor for subsequent morbidity or death. Despite their ubiquity, it is clear that we have limited understanding of the effects of the intravenous fluids we use daily in the most vulnerable of patient groups. The research agenda in this field is large and urgent.

Citations

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  • Fluid Stewardship of Maintenance Intravenous Fluids
    John R. Carr, W. Anthony Hawkins, Andrea Sikora Newsome, Susan E. Smith, Clemmons Amber B, Christopher M. Bland, Trisha N. Branan
    Journal of Pharmacy Practice.2022; 35(5): 769.     CrossRef
  • Clinician attitudes and concordance with self-assessed and actual intravenous fluid prescribing patterns: A single-institution evaluation of survey and electronic prescribing data
    Michelle C. Spiegel, Annie N. Simpson, Nandita R. Nadig, Dee W. Ford, Andrew J. Goodwin
    The American Journal of the Medical Sciences.2022; 364(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • Acetate‐ versus lactate‐buffered crystalloid solutions: A systematic review with meta‐analysis and trial sequential analysis
    Karen Louise Ellekjaer, Anders Perner, Praleene Sivapalan, Morten Hylander Møller
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica.2022; 66(7): 782.     CrossRef
  • A fuzzy model for predicting burn patients’ intravenous fluid resuscitation rate
    Sayma Alam Suha, M. Akhtaruzzaman, Tahsina Farah Sanam
    Healthcare Analytics.2022; 2: 100070.     CrossRef
  • Development and implementation of a clinical decision support-based initiative to drive intravenous fluid prescribing
    Michelle C. Spiegel, Annie N. Simpson, Achsah Philip, Carolyn M. Bell, Nandita R. Nadig, Dee W. Ford, Andrew J. Goodwin
    International Journal of Medical Informatics.2021; 156: 104619.     CrossRef
  • Influence of acetate containing fluid versus lactate containing fluid on acid-base status, electrolyte level, and blood lactate level in dehydrated dogs
    Annika Heitland, Ute Klein-Richers, Katrin Hartmann, René Dörfelt
    Veterinary World.2021; : 2714.     CrossRef
  • Infusion fluids: a clinical pharmacologist’s view
    E.A. Ushkalova, S.K. Zyryanov, K.E. Zatolochina, O.I. Butranova
    Anesteziologiya i reanimatologiya.2021; (6): 100.     CrossRef
  • Pathophysiology of Volume Administration in Septic Shock and the Role of the Clinical Pharmacist
    Brittany D. Bissell, Breanne Mefford
    Annals of Pharmacotherapy.2020; 54(4): 388.     CrossRef
  • Lactate versus acetate buffered intravenous crystalloid solutions: a scoping review
    Karen L. Ellekjaer, Anders Perner, Martine M. Jensen, Morten H. Møller
    British Journal of Anaesthesia.2020; 125(5): 693.     CrossRef
  • Balanced Crystalloid Solutions
    Matthew W. Semler, John A. Kellum
    American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.2019; 199(8): 952.     CrossRef
  • Does Fluid Type and Amount Affect Kidney Function in Critical Illness?
    Neil J. Glassford, Rinaldo Bellomo
    Critical Care Clinics.2018; 34(2): 279.     CrossRef
  • Resuscitation fluids
    Jonathan D. Casey, Ryan M. Brown, Matthew W. Semler
    Current Opinion in Critical Care.2018; 24(6): 512.     CrossRef
  • Utility of Volume Assessment Using Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis in Critically Ill Patients Receiving Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Prospective Observational Study
    Ki Hyun Park, Jung-ho Shin, Jin Ho Hwang, Su Hyun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(3): 256.     CrossRef
Cardiology/Infection
How Do I Integrate Hemodynamic Variables When Managing Septic Shock?
Olfa Hamzaoui, Jean-Louis Teboul
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(4):265-275.   Published online November 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00927
  • 16,599 View
  • 1,061 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hemodynamic management of sepsis-induced circulatory failure is complex since this pathological state includes multiple cardiovascular derangements that can vary from patient to patient according to the degree of hypovolemia, of vascular tone depression, of myocardial depression and of microvascular dysfunction. The treatment of the sepsis-induced circulatory failure is thus not univocal and should be adapted on an individual basis. As physical examination is insufficient to obtain a comprehensive picture of the hemodynamic status, numerous hemodynamic variables more or less invasively collected, have been proposed to well assess the severity of each component of the circulatory failure and to monitor the response to therapy. In this article, we first describe the hemodynamic variables, which are the most relevant to be used, emphasizing on their physiological meaning, their validation and their limitations in patients with septic shock. We then proposed a general approach for managing patients with septic shock by describing the logical steps that need to be followed in order to select and deliver the most appropriate therapies. This therapeutic approach is essentially based on knowledge of physiology, of pathophysiology of sepsis, and of published data from clinical studies that addressed the issue of hemodynamic management of septic shock.

Citations

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  • Enhancement in Performance of Septic Shock Prediction Using National Early Warning Score, Initial Triage Information, and Machine Learning Analysis
    Hyoungju Yun, Jeong Ho Park, Dong Hyun Choi, Sang Do Shin, Myoung-jin Jang, Hyoun-Joong Kong, Suk Wha Kim
    The Journal of Emergency Medicine.2021; 61(1): 1.     CrossRef
Policy
The ABCDEF Implementation Bundle
Annachiara Marra, Kwame Frimpong, E. Wesley Ely
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(3):181-193.   Published online August 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00682
  • 30,242 View
  • 1,291 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Long-term morbidity, long-term cognitive impairment and hospitalization-associated disability are common occurrence in the survivors of critical illness, with significant consequences for patients and for the caregivers. The ABCDEF bundle represents an evidence-based guide for clinicians to approach the organizational changes needed for optimizing ICU patient recovery and outcomes. The ABCDEF bundle includes: Assess, Prevent, and Manage Pain, Both Spontaneous Awakening Trials (SAT) and Spontaneous Breathing Trials (SBT), Choice of analgesia and sedation, Delirium: Assess, Prevent, and Manage, Early mobility and Exercise, and Family engagement. The purpose of this review is to describe the core features of the ABCDEF bundle.

Citations

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  • The impact of multidisciplinary huddle in decreasing time to extubation from mechanical ventilation
    Rana Al Tabee, AmalA Al Khalfan, KhaledA Al Awam
    Saudi Critical Care Journal.2020; 4(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Patients´ experiences of pain in the intensive care – The delicate balance of control
    Mia Hylén, Eva Akerman, Ewa Idvall, Carin Alm‐Roijer
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2020; 76(10): 2660.     CrossRef
  • Nursing Interventions to Prevent Delirium in Critically Ill Patients in the Intensive Care Unit during the COVID19 Pandemic—Narrative Overview
    Dorota Ozga, Sabina Krupa, Paweł Witt, Wioletta Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska
    Healthcare.2020; 8(4): 578.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Lung Ultrasound in Critically Ill Patients
Jinwoo Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(1):4-9.   Published online February 29, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.1.4
  • 9,418 View
  • 388 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lung ultrasound (LUS) is an emerging tool for intensivists to diagnose and monitor thoracic diseases of critically ill patients. It is easily applied at the bedside in real time and is free of radiation hazards. In the intensive care units (ICUs) lung ultrasound can be used to diagnose pneumothorax and interstitial syndrome. It can also be used to monitor changes in the lung. However, the major limitations of LUS is that it is highly operator dependent and cannot be applied in patients with thoracic dressings, subcutaenous emphysema or pleural calcifications. This article reviews the basic principles of lung ultrasound and discusses how it can be used in ICUs.

Citations

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  • A comparative study between high-flow nasal oxygen therapy and venturi mask oxygen therapy for postoperative laparoscopic bariatric surgery patients with atelectasis: a randomized clinical trial
    Asmaa Ahmed Nabeeh Negmeldin Abdelr Allam, Mayar Hassan Sayed Ahmed Elsersi, Galal Adel Mohamed Abdelreheem Elkady, Amr Fouad Hafez, Mohamed Abdelsalam Aly Algendy
    Ain-Shams Journal of Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of transalveolar pressure measurement as a monitoring parameter for lung recruitment in postcardiac surgery hypoxic patients
    Ibrahim Mabrouk Ibrahim, Ahmed Yousef, Amal Sabry, Ayman Khalifa
    Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia.2021; 37(1): 145.     CrossRef
  • Postoperative care of cardiac surgery patients: A protocolized approach towards enhanced recovery versus the conventional approach
    Moustafa Ibrahim Abd EL-Aal Halwag, Mahar Ahmed Doghiem, Moustafa Abdelaziz Moustafa, Hossam Ossama Ahmed Sorour
    Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia.2021; 37(1): 410.     CrossRef
Neurosurgery
Therapeutic Hypothermia in Traumatic Brain injury; Review of History, Pathophysiology and Current Studies
Do-Keun Kim, Dong-Keun Hyun
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(3):143-150.   Published online August 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.3.143
  • 7,544 View
  • 194 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The fact that therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has lowered intracranial pressure and protected brain in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is well known throughout past sources and experimental data. In this paper, the result of TH in TBI needs to be confirmed. The result of North American Brain Injury Study; Hypothermia (NAVIS-H) 1 and 2, Eurotherm3235, Japan trauma society study was reviewed throughout randomized controlled study which performed recently. The prognosis was not confirmed throughout TH in NAVIS-H1; however, there was statistical significance among the group of 45 years or less and below 35 degree in celcius which checked when he or she visited initially. Hence, NAVIS-H2 study was preceded. In patient who had surgically removed hematoma, the effects of TH were proved compared to diffuse brain damage in NAVIS-H2 study. This was found in the result of Japan neurotrauma data bank. Eurotherm study has been doing, which leads to collect many data later on. The TBI of TH makes them better prognosis in patients who had surgically removed hematoma and lowered initial body temperature. Later on, it is considered further study is necessary.
Psychology/Neurology
Intensive Care Unit Delirium
Yongsuk Kim, Sung Jin Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2015;30(2):63-72.   Published online May 31, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2015.30.2.63
  • 7,898 View
  • 268 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Delirium is described as a manifestation of acute brain injury and recognized as one of the most common complications in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Although the causes of delirium vary widely among patients, delirium increases the risk of longer ICU and hospital length of stay, death, cost of care, and post-ICU cognitive impairment. Prevention and early detection are therefore crucial. However, the clinical approach toward delirium is not sufficiently aggressive, despite the condition’s high incidence and prevalence in the ICU setting. While the underlying pathophysiology of delirium is not fully understood, many risk factors have been suggested. As a way to improve delirium-related clinical outcome, high-risk patients can be identified. A valid and reliable bedside screening tool is also needed to detect the symptoms of delirium early. Delirium is commonly treated with medications, and haloperidol and atypical antipsychotics are commonly used as standard treatment options for ICU patients although their efficacy and safety have not been established. The approaches for the treatment of delirium should focus on identifying the underlying causes and reducing modifiable risk factors to promote early mobilization.
Policy
How to Enhance Critical Care in Korea: Challenges and Vision
Younsuck Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):246-249.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.246
  • 3,615 View
  • 65 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
The goal of critical care is to reverse patients' acute problems in effective and ethical ways with minimum costs. Unlike in other medical fields, the quality of Korean critical care has lagged behind that of advanced countries. Moreover, the level of critical care quality differs significantly between university hospitals. The suboptimal critical care level has multifactorial causes. The major challenge to Korean intensivists is, therefore, how to overcome barriers in the current critical care delivery system to improve outcomes for critically ill patients and reduce medical errors in error-prone Intensive Care Unit (ICUs). A long-term task force including all stakeholders should address the multifactorial barriers to better outcomes. The Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine should perform the central role to dismantle the barriers step by step with a long-term vision for a desirable critical care delivery system in our society. A capable critical care team with full-time intensivists is the most urgent requirement for proper, timely care in ICUs. Intensivists should focus on basic but essential management so scarcity of resources can be minimized. Publicity about ICU to the general public is also urgently required to draw the attention of medical policy makers to the current suboptimal level of our critical care system.

Citations

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  • Major Obstacles to Implement a Full-Time Intensivist in Korean Adult ICUs: a Questionnaire Survey
    Jun Wan Lee, Jae Young Moon, Seok Wha Youn, Yong Sup Shin, Sang Il Park, Dong Chan Kim, Younsuk Koh
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2016; 31(2): 111.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care