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Outcomes of critically ill patients according to the perception of intensivists on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission
Youjin Chang, Kyoung Ran Kim, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(4):351-360.   Published online November 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00283
  • 4,880 View
  • 135 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
It is important for intensivists to determine which patient may benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We aimed to assess the outcomes of patients perceived as non-beneficially or beneficially admitted to the ICU and evaluate whether their prognosis was consistent with the intensivists’ perception.
Methods
A prospective observational study was conducted on patients admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary referral center between February and April 2014. The perceptions of four intensivists at admission (day 1) and on day 3 were investigated as non-beneficial admission, beneficial admission, or indeterminate state.
Results
A total of 210 patients were enrolled. On days 1 and 3, 22 (10%) and 23 (11%) patients were judged as having non-beneficial admission; 166 (79%) and 159 (79%), beneficial admission; and 22 (10%) and 21 (10%), indeterminate state, respectively. The ICU mortality rates of each group were 64%, 22%, and 57%, respectively; their 6-month mortality rates were 100%, 46%, and 81%, respectively. The perceptions of non-beneficial admission or indeterminate state were the significant predictors of ICU mortality (day 3, odds ratio [OR], 4.049; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.892–8.664; P<0.001) and 6-month mortality (day 1: OR, 4.983; 95% CI, 1.260–19.703; P=0.022; day 3: OR, 4.459; 95% CI, 1.162–17.121; P=0.029).
Conclusions
The outcomes of patients perceived as having non-beneficial admission were extremely poor. The intensivists’ perception was important in predicting patients’ outcomes and was more consistent with long-term prognosis than with immediate outcomes. The intensivists’ role can be reflected in limited ICU resource utilization.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics of critically ill patients with cancer associated with intensivist's perception of inappropriateness of ICU admission: A retrospective cohort study
    Carla Marchini Dias da Silva, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro Besen, Antônio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Journal of Critical Care.2024; 79: 154468.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics, ICU Interventions, and Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Palliative Care Triggers in a Mixed Community-Based Intensive Care Unit
    Michele M. Iguina, Aunie M. Danyalian, Ilko Luque, Umair Shaikh, Sanaz B. Kashan, Dionne Morgan, Daniel Heller, Mauricio Danckers
    Journal of Palliative Care.2023; 38(2): 126.     CrossRef
  • Association of appropriateness for ICU admission with resource use, organ support and long-term survival in critically ill cancer patients
    Carla Marchini Dias Silva, Janaina Naiara Germano, Anna Karolyne de Araujo Costa, Giovanna Alves Gennari, Pedro Caruso, Antonio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Internal and Emergency Medicine.2023; 18(4): 1191.     CrossRef
  • Can the intensivists predict the outcomes of critically ill patients on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission for limited intensive care unit resources ?
    SeungYong Park
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(4): 388.     CrossRef
Effect of Admission Time to the Medical Intensive Care Unit on Acute Critical Patient Outcomes
Taejin Park, Sang Bum Hong, Chae Man Lim, Younsuck Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2010;25(2):71-75.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2010.25.2.71
  • 2,469 View
  • 21 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The initial management of acute critical patients is important. However, not all hospital facilities and staff are available during off-duty time. We determined the effects of intensive care unit (ICU) admission time on patient outcomes.
METHODS
This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a 28-bed medical ICU in 1 tertiary university hospital. Patients who were admitted between 1 March 2009 and 31 August 2009 were divided according to the time of admission into the "duty time group" (9 AM-5 PM on weekdays) and the "off-duty time group" (5 PM-9 AM on weekdays and at any time on weekends). The baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between these two groups. The primary endpoint of this study was hospital mortality; the secondary endpoints were ICU mortality and length of ICU stay, hospital length of stay, and mechanical ventilation time.
RESULTS
Two hundred eight (64.8%) of 321 enrolled patients were admitted during off-duty time. The baseline characteristics between the 2 groups were not significantly different. Hospital mortality was 37 (32.7%) in the "duty time group" and 82 (38.4%) in the "off-duty time group" (p = 0.237). There were no significant differences in secondary endpoints between the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS
Off-duty time admission to the ICU had no effect on hospital and ICU mortality, length of hospital and ICU stay, and mechanical ventilation time compared to duty time admission.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Validity and Reliability of the Korean Version of the Partners In Health Scale (PIH-K)
    Mi-Kyeong Jeon, Jung-Won Ahn, Yeon-Hwan Park, Mi-Kyoung Lee
    Journal of Korean Critical Care Nursing.2019; 12(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Risk Factors to Predict Intensive Care Unit Transfer in Medical in-Patients
    Ju Ry Lee, Hye Ran Choi
    Journal of Korean Biological Nursing Science.2014; 16(4): 259.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of Screening Criteria System Used by Medical Alert Team in a General Hospital
    Hyejin Joo, So Hee Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Young Seok Lee, Jin Won Huh
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2012; 27(3): 151.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care