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Outcomes of critically ill patients according to the perception of intensivists on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission
Youjin Chang, Kyoung Ran Kim, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(4):351-360.   Published online November 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00283
  • 5,108 View
  • 138 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
It is important for intensivists to determine which patient may benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We aimed to assess the outcomes of patients perceived as non-beneficially or beneficially admitted to the ICU and evaluate whether their prognosis was consistent with the intensivists’ perception.
Methods
A prospective observational study was conducted on patients admitted to the medical ICU of a tertiary referral center between February and April 2014. The perceptions of four intensivists at admission (day 1) and on day 3 were investigated as non-beneficial admission, beneficial admission, or indeterminate state.
Results
A total of 210 patients were enrolled. On days 1 and 3, 22 (10%) and 23 (11%) patients were judged as having non-beneficial admission; 166 (79%) and 159 (79%), beneficial admission; and 22 (10%) and 21 (10%), indeterminate state, respectively. The ICU mortality rates of each group were 64%, 22%, and 57%, respectively; their 6-month mortality rates were 100%, 46%, and 81%, respectively. The perceptions of non-beneficial admission or indeterminate state were the significant predictors of ICU mortality (day 3, odds ratio [OR], 4.049; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.892–8.664; P<0.001) and 6-month mortality (day 1: OR, 4.983; 95% CI, 1.260–19.703; P=0.022; day 3: OR, 4.459; 95% CI, 1.162–17.121; P=0.029).
Conclusions
The outcomes of patients perceived as having non-beneficial admission were extremely poor. The intensivists’ perception was important in predicting patients’ outcomes and was more consistent with long-term prognosis than with immediate outcomes. The intensivists’ role can be reflected in limited ICU resource utilization.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics of critically ill patients with cancer associated with intensivist's perception of inappropriateness of ICU admission: A retrospective cohort study
    Carla Marchini Dias da Silva, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro Besen, Antônio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Journal of Critical Care.2024; 79: 154468.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics, ICU Interventions, and Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Palliative Care Triggers in a Mixed Community-Based Intensive Care Unit
    Michele M. Iguina, Aunie M. Danyalian, Ilko Luque, Umair Shaikh, Sanaz B. Kashan, Dionne Morgan, Daniel Heller, Mauricio Danckers
    Journal of Palliative Care.2023; 38(2): 126.     CrossRef
  • Association of appropriateness for ICU admission with resource use, organ support and long-term survival in critically ill cancer patients
    Carla Marchini Dias Silva, Janaina Naiara Germano, Anna Karolyne de Araujo Costa, Giovanna Alves Gennari, Pedro Caruso, Antonio Paulo Nassar Jr
    Internal and Emergency Medicine.2023; 18(4): 1191.     CrossRef
  • Can the intensivists predict the outcomes of critically ill patients on the appropriateness of intensive care unit admission for limited intensive care unit resources ?
    SeungYong Park
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(4): 388.     CrossRef
Healthcare Professional's Knowledge, Perception and Performance on Early Enteral Nutrition for Critically Ill Patients
Sun Hee Yun, Sun Jung Kim, Eui Geum Oh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(1):36-44.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.1.36
  • 2,878 View
  • 65 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Proper nutritional supplement is one of the fundamental management domains for critical ill patients. While it shows positive effect on processing and prognosis of critical ill patients, early enteral nutrition is overlooked. This study explored healthcare professional's level of knowledge perception and performance on early enteral nutrition for critically ill patients. Data was collected from a convenient sample of 319 registered doctors, nurses and nutritionists in ICU at seven university hospitals.
METHODS
A cross-sectional survey design was used. The participants were assessed by questionnaires, specifically designed for the study and verified for the content validity by professional reviewers related with critical ill patients.
RESULTS
While the level of the perception of early enteral nutrition is high, the level of knowledge and performance are relatively low. The nurses showed a statistically significant difference on the level of knowledge, by their educational backgrounds and clinical experiences. Regarding the hospital support system, the doctors showed a significant difference on the level of perception and performance, while the nurses only showed that difference on the level of performance. It was shown that with higher the level of knowledge regarding the early enteral nutrition, the higher the level of performance. Further, the higher the level of perception, the higher the level of performance was observed. The hospital support system and the perception of the healthcare professionals are two most influential factors to affect the performance of the healthcare professionals related with the early enteral nutrition for the critically ill patients.
CONCLUSION
To perform the proper early enteral nutrition, the hospital support system and the level of the healthcare professionals' perception, are two most important factors. Therefore, the efforts to build the hospital support system along with the educational provisions are needed.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Effects of a video-based enteral nutrition education program using QR codes for intensive care unit nurses: a quasi-experimental study
    Won Kee Seo, Hyunjung Kim
    Journal of Korean Biological Nursing Science.2024; 26(1): 16.     CrossRef
  • Critical Care Nurses’ Perceptions of Enteral Nutrition: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study
    Khaled Mohammed Al-Sayaghi, Talal Ali Hussein Saad Alqalah, Sameer Abdulmalik Alkubati, Gamil Ghaleb Alrubaiee, Sultan Abdulwadoud Alshoabi, Masouda Hassan Atrous, Farida Khalil Ibrahim Mohamed, Kamal Dahan Alsultan, Awadia Greeballah Suliman, Moawia Bush
    The Open Nursing Journal.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the Occurrence of Diarrhea in Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Units
    Hanna Lee, Rhayun Song
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2019; 26(4): 221.     CrossRef
  • Critical Care Nurses’ Perception, Knowledge, and Practices of Enteral Nutrition
    Hyunjung Kim, Eunjin Soun
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2016; 23(4): 383.     CrossRef
  • Nutritional Assessment of ICU Inpatients with Tube Feeding
    Yu-Jin Kim, Jung-Sook Seo
    Journal of the Korean Dietetic Association.2015; 21(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Nutritional Support, Gastric Residual Volume and Nutritional Status during Enteral Nutrition in Intensive Care Unit Patients
    Minju Lee, Jiyeon Kang
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2014; 26(6): 621.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care