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HOME > Acute Crit Care > Volume 21(1); 2006 > Article
Original Article Medicolegal Aspects on Central Venous Catheterization Related Injury
Hyuna Bae, Sungeun Kim, Seokbae Lee, Rack Kyung Chung

DOI: https://doi.org/
1Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.
2Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan, Korea.
3Legal Research Institute of Korea University, Korea.
4Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Korea. rkchung@ewha.ac.kr
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BACKGROUND
We describe the characteristics of malpractice claims related to central venous catheterization and identify causes and potential preventability of such claims. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed by reviewing records at Lawnb and Lx CD-rom. The records on closed malpractice claim related to central venous catheterization were abstracted from the files available for analysis. The records were reviewed and were analysed to determine the factors associated with a successful defense.
RESULTS
Twelve closed claim cases, related to central venous cathetertization were reviewed in the data for malpractice. Catheter-related complications were pneumothorax, hemothorax, cardiac tamponade, pyothorax, hematoma due to arterial puncture, pseudoaneurysm. Almost cases resulted in indemnity payment and verdict for patient. CONCLUSIONS: Although malpractice claims related to central venous catheterization were uncommon, they resulted in high rate and amount of indemnity payments. In pediatric patient, catheterization should be performed with attention. Clinicians should consider the underlying disease of patients and do any pretreatment if needed. Post-procedural radiologic confirmation can improve patient outcome and is also associated with decreased indemnity risk. Informed consent is also important.


ACC : Acute and Critical Care