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Erratum
Pulmonary
Erratum to “Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study”
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):172-172.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2020;35(4):255
  • 3,149 View
  • 60 Download
PDF
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(4):255-262.   Published online November 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2021;36(2):172
  • 6,232 View
  • 231 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The use of sedative drugs may be an important therapeutic intervention during noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in intensive care units (ICUs). The purpose of this study was to assess the current application of analgosedation in NIV and its impact on clinical outcomes in Korean ICUs.
Methods
Twenty Korean ICUs participated in the study, and data was collected on NIV use during the period between June 2017 and February 2018. Demographic data from all adult patients, NIV clinical parameters, and hospital mortality were included.
Results
A total of 155 patients treated with NIV in the ICUs were included, of whom 26 received pain and sedation therapy (sedation group) and 129 did not (control group). The primary cause of ICU admission was due to acute exacerbation of obstructed lung disease (45.7%) in the control group and pneumonia treatment (53.8%) in the sedation group. In addition, causes of NIV application included acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the control group (62.8%) and post-extubation respiratory failure in the sedation group (57.7%). Arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels before and after 2 hours of NIV treatment were significantly decreased in both groups: from 61.9±23.8 mm Hg to 54.9±17.6 mm Hg in the control group (P<0.001) and from 54.9±15.1 mm Hg to 51.1±15.1 mm Hg in the sedation group (P=0.048). No significant differences were observed in the success rate of NIV weaning, complications, length of ICU stay, ICU survival rate, or hospital survival rate between the groups.
Conclusions
In NIV patients, analgosedation therapy may have no harmful effects on complications, NIV weaning success, and mortality compared to the control group. Therefore, sedation during NIV may not be unsafe and can be used in patients for pain control when indicated.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sedation and analgesia strategies for non-invasive mechanical ventilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Baolu Yang, Leyi Gao, Zhaohui Tong
    Heart & Lung.2024; 63: 42.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Music Therapy and Sound Isolation on the Comfort of Mechanically Ventilated Patients
    Sinem Çalışkan, Esra Akın, Mehmet Uyar
    Turkish Journal of Intensive Care.2024; 22(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • 2021 KSCCM clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disturbance in the intensive care unit
    Yijun Seo, Hak-Jae Lee, Eun Jin Ha, Tae Sun Ha
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Comfort During Non-invasive Ventilation
    Gianmaria Cammarota, Rachele Simonte, Edoardo De Robertis
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: noninvasive mechanical ventilation
    Sunghoon Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 144.     CrossRef
  • Dexmedetomidine-Induced Aortic Contraction Involves Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Rats
    Soo Hee Lee, Seong-Chun Kwon, Seong-Ho Ok, Seung Hyun Ahn, Sung Il Bae, Ji-Yoon Kim, Yeran Hwang, Kyeong-Eon Park, Mingu Kim, Ju-Tae Sohn
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(8): 4320.     CrossRef
Rapid response system
Utilization of a rapid response team and associated outcomes in patients with malignancy
Jongmin Lee, Woo Ho Ban, Sei Won Kim, Eun Young Kim, Mi Ra Han, Seok Chan Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(1):16-23.   Published online February 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00675
  • 5,608 View
  • 137 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment have improved long-term outcomes in cancer patients. As a result, the requirement for a rapid response team (RRT) for cancer patients is also increasing. This study aimed to analyze utilization of an RRT and the associations between related factors and mortality in a population of cancer patients. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included hospitalized patients at a single academic medical center in Seoul, Korea, who required RRT activation during a 6-year period from June 2013 to December 2018. Results: Overall, 164 of the 457 patients who met the above criteria were cancer patients, and they had a significantly higher Charlson comorbidity score than the non-cancer patients (5.0 vs. 7.0, P<0.001). A significantly larger proportion of cancer patients required intensive care unit transfer (51.8% vs. 41.0%, P=0.032). Cancer patients also had significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared with other patients (39.6% vs. 10.9%, P<0.001). Furthermore, presence of cancer was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 3.93). Among cancer patients, higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II at the time of RRT activation was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality regardless of malignancy (adjusted OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.15). Conclusions: Cancer patients requiring RRT activation have significantly higher rates of inhospital mortality than patients not using RRT. Higher severity score at the time of RRT activation in patients with malignancy was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intensivmedizinisches Kontinuum in der Versorgung von Krebskranken
    Catherina Lück
    InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie.2023; 26(5): 10.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients screened by rapid response team who transferred to the intensive care unit
    Song-I. Lee, Jeong Suk Koh, Yoon Joo Kim, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Emergency Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Prognosis of Hospitalized Patients at High Risk of Deterioration Identified by the Rapid Response System: a Multicenter Cohort Study
    Sang Hyuk Kim, Ji Young Hong, Youlim Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Novel Adaptive T-Cell Oncological Treatments Lead to New Challenges for Medical Emergency Teams: A 2-Year Experience From a Tertiary-Care Hospital in Switzerland
    Anna Sarah Messmer, Yok-Ai Que, Christoph Schankin, Yara Banz, Ulrike Bacher, Urban Novak, Thomas Pabst
    Critical Care Explorations.2021; 3(10): e0552.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of second-tier rapid response activations in a tertiary referral hospital: A prospective observational study
    Ken Junyang Goh, Hui Zhong Chai, Lit Soo Ng, Joanna Phone Ko, Deshawn Chong Xuan Tan, Hui Li Tan, Constance Wei-Shan Teo, Ghee Chee Phua, Qiao Li Tan
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2021; 50(11): 838.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Rapid Response Team on In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Hematologic Malignancy
    So-Jung Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Youn-Suck Koh, Jin-Won Huh
    Quality Improvement in Health Care.2021; 27(2): 18.     CrossRef
Rapid response system
Epidemiology and Clinical Characteristics of Rapid Response Team Activations
Sei Won Kim, Hwa Young Lee, Mi Ra Han, Yong Suk Lee, Eun Hyoung Kang, Eun Ju Jang, Keum Sook Jeun, Seok Chan Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(2):124-132.   Published online May 31, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00199
  • 7,849 View
  • 212 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
To ensure patient safety and improvements in the quality of hospital care, rapid response teams (RRTs) have been implemented in many countries, including Korea. The goal of an RRT is early identification and response to clinical deterioration in patients. However, there are differences in RRT systems among hospitals and limited data are available.
Methods
In Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, the St. Mary’s Advanced Life Support Team was implemented in June 2013. We retrospectively reviewed the RRT activation records of 287 cases from June 2013 to December 2016.
Results
The median response time and median modified early warning score were 8.6 minutes (interquartile range, 5.6 to 11.6 minutes) and 5.0 points (interquartile range, 4.0 to 7.0 points), respectively. Residents (35.8%) and nurses (59.1%) were the main activators of the RRT. Interestingly, postoperative patients account for a large percentage of the RRT activation cases (69.3%). The survival rate was 83.6% and survival was mainly associated with malignancy, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation-II score, and the time from admission to RRT activation. RRT activation with screening showed a better outcome compared to activation via a phone call in terms of the intensive care unit admission rate and length of hospital stay after RRT activation.
Conclusions
Malignancy was the most important factor related to survival. In addition, RRT activation with patient screening showed a better outcome compared to activation via a phone call. Further studies are needed to determine the effective screening criteria and improve the quality of the RRT system.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development of a comprehensive model for the role of the rapid response team nurse
    Youn-Hui Won, Jiyeon Kang
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing.2022; 68: 103136.     CrossRef
  • Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) to identify and mitigate failures in a hospital rapid response system (RRS)
    Ehsan Ullah, Mirza Mansoor Baig, Hamid GholamHosseini, Jun Lu
    Heliyon.2022; 8(2): e08944.     CrossRef
  • Neurological Emergencies in Patients Hospitalized With Nonneurological Illness
    Sang-Beom Jeon, Han-Bin Lee, Yong Seo Koo, Hyunjo Lee, Jung Hwa Lee, Bobin Park, Soh Hyun Choi, Suyeon Jeong, Jun Young Chang, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Sang-Ahm Lee
    Journal of Patient Safety.2021; 17(8): e1332.     CrossRef
  • Rapid response systems in Korea
    Bo Young Lee, Sang-Bum Hong
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(2): 108.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care