Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

ACC : Acute and Critical Care

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Most cited articles

Page Path
HOME > Issue > Most cited articles
77 Most cited articles
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles

From articles published in Acute and Critical Care during the past two years (2022 ~ ).

Guideline
Pharmacology
2021 KSCCM clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disturbance in the intensive care unit
Yijun Seo, Hak-Jae Lee, Eun Jin Ha, Tae Sun Ha
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):1-25.   Published online February 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00094
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2023;38(1):149
  • 13,628 View
  • 1,482 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
We revised and expanded the “2010 Guideline for the Use of Sedatives and Analgesics in the Adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU).” We revised the 2010 Guideline based mainly on the 2018 “Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption (PADIS) in Adult Patients in the ICU,” which was an updated 2013 pain, agitation, and delirium guideline with the inclusion of two additional topics (rehabilitation/mobility and sleep). Since it was not possible to hold face-to-face meetings of panels due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, all discussions took place via virtual conference platforms and e-mail with the participation of all panelists. All authors drafted the recommendations, and all panelists discussed and revised the recommendations several times. The quality of evidence for each recommendation was classified as high (level A), moderate (level B), or low/very low (level C), and all panelists voted on the quality level of each recommendation. The participating panelists had no conflicts of interest on related topics. The development of this guideline was independent of any industry funding. The Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility (rehabilitation/mobilization), and Sleep Disturbance panels issued 42 recommendations (level A, 6; level B, 18; and level C, 18). The 2021 clinical practice guideline provides up-to-date information on how to prevent and manage pain, agitation/sedation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disturbance in adult ICU patients. We believe that these guidelines can provide an integrated method for clinicians to manage PADIS in adult ICU patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Potentially inappropriate medications with older people in intensive care and associated factors: a historic cohort study
    Karina Sichieri, Danilo Donizetti Trevisan, Ricardo Luís Barbosa, Silvia Regina Secoli
    Sao Paulo Medical Journal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric Consults Associated With Longer Length of Stay in Trauma Patients—A Retrospective Study
    Sanjay Balijepalli, Kathryn Mansuri, Cindy Gonzalez, Oveys Mansuri
    Journal of Surgical Research.2024; 293: 46.     CrossRef
  • Sleep in the intensive and intermediate care units: Exploring related factors of delirium, benzodiazepine use and mortality
    Adrienne E. van der Hoeven, Denise Bijlenga, Ernst van der Hoeven, Mink S. Schinkelshoek, Floor W. Hiemstra, Laura Kervezee, David J. van Westerloo, Rolf Fronczek, Gert Jan Lammers
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing.2024; 81: 103603.     CrossRef
  • Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Indonesian version of the Critical-care Pain Observation Tool
    Luthfi Fauzy Asriyanto, Nur Chayati
    International Journal of Nursing Sciences.2024; 11(1): 113.     CrossRef
  • Postoperative Psychoses in Patients with Brain Gliomas
    O. S. Zaitsev, N. P. Ilyaev, O. A. Maksakova
    Psikhiatriya.2024; 21(7): 65.     CrossRef
  • End‐of‐life care in the intensive care unit
    M. Tanaka Gutiez, N. Efstathiou, R. Innes, V. Metaxa
    Anaesthesia.2023; 78(5): 636.     CrossRef
  • The Profile of Early Sedation Depth and Clinical Outcomes of Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Korea
    Dong-gon Hyun, Jee Hwan Ahn, Ha-Yeong Gil, Chung Mo Nam, Choa Yun, Jae-Myeong Lee, Jae Hun Kim, Dong-Hyun Lee, Ki Hoon Kim, Dong Jung Kim, Sang-Min Lee, Ho-Geol Ryu, Suk-Kyung Hong, Jae-Bum Kim, Eun Young Choi, JongHyun Baek, Jeoungmin Kim, Eun Jin Kim, T
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between the PRE-DELIRIC score and the prognosis in COVID-19 ICU patients
    Bilge Banu Taşdemir Mecit
    Journal of Surgery and Medicine.2023; 7(5): 343.     CrossRef
  • Systemic Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatories for Analgesia in Postoperative Critical Care Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Control Trials
    Chen Hsiang Ma, Kimberly B. Tworek, Janice Y. Kung, Sebastian Kilcommons, Kathleen Wheeler, Arabesque Parker, Janek Senaratne, Erika Macintyre, Wendy Sligl, Constantine J. Karvellas, Fernando G. Zampieri, Demetrios Jim Kutsogiannis, John Basmaji, Kimberle
    Critical Care Explorations.2023; 5(7): e0938.     CrossRef
  • Pain Control and Sedation in Neuro Intensive Critical Unit
    Soo-Hyun Park, Yerim Kim, Yeojin Kim, Jong Seok Bae, Ju-Hun Lee, Wookyung Kim, Hong-Ki Song
    Journal of the Korean Neurological Association.2023; 41(3): 169.     CrossRef
  • Preoperative Anxiety and Its Postoperative Associated Factors in Patients Receiving Post Anesthetic Recovery Care at Surgical Intensive Care Unit
    Yul Ha Lee, Hye-Ja Park
    Journal of Health Informatics and Statistics.2023; 48(3): 267.     CrossRef
  • Diagnostic Value of the Bispectral Index to Assess Sleep Quality after Elective Surgery in Intensive Care Unit
    Naricha Chirakalwasan, Pongpol Sirilaksanamanon, Thammasak Thawitsri, Somrat Charuluxananan
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2023; 27(11): 795.     CrossRef
  • Sedation of patients in intensive care units. Guidelines
    V.I. Potievskaya, I.B. Zabolotskikh, I.E. Gridchik, A.I. Gritsan, A.A. Eremenko, I.A. Kozlov, A.L. Levit, V.A. Mazurok, I.V. Molchanov
    Anesteziologiya i reanimatologiya.2023; (5): 6.     CrossRef
  • Sedation for Patients with Sepsis: Towards a Personalised Approach
    José Miguel Marcos-Vidal, Rafael González, María Merino, Eva Higuera, Cristina García
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2023; 13(12): 1641.     CrossRef
  • Performance, Knowledge, and Barrier Awareness of Medical Staff Regarding the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Critical Care Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Hyo-Geun Song, Duckhee Chae, Sung-Hee Yoo
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2023; 35(4): 379.     CrossRef
  • ICU-Induced Disability Persists With or Without COVID-19—This Is a Call for F to A Bundle Action*
    Heidi Engel
    Critical Care Medicine.2022; 50(11): 1665.     CrossRef
  • Actigraphy-Based Assessment of Sleep Parameters in Intensive Care Unit Patients Receiving Respiratory Support Therapy
    Jiyeon Kang, Yongbin Kwon
    Journal of Korean Critical Care Nursing.2022; 15(3): 115.     CrossRef
Review Article
Neurosurgery
Brain-lung interaction: a vicious cycle in traumatic brain injury
Ariana Alejandra Chacón-Aponte, Érika Andrea Durán-Vargas, Jaime Adolfo Arévalo-Carrillo, Iván David Lozada-Martínez, Maria Paz Bolaño-Romero, Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Pedro Grille, Tariq Janjua
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):35-44.   Published online February 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01193
  • 12,473 View
  • 825 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The brain-lung interaction can seriously affect patients with traumatic brain injury, triggering a vicious cycle that worsens patient prognosis. Although the mechanisms of the interaction are not fully elucidated, several hypotheses, notably the “blast injury” theory or “double hit” model, have been proposed and constitute the basis of its development and progression. The brain and lungs strongly interact via complex pathways from the brain to the lungs but also from the lungs to the brain. The main pulmonary disorders that occur after brain injuries are neurogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the principal brain disorders after lung injuries include brain hypoxia and intracranial hypertension. All of these conditions are key considerations for management therapies after traumatic brain injury and need exceptional case-by-case monitoring to avoid neurological or pulmonary complications. This review aims to describe the history, pathophysiology, risk factors, characteristics, and complications of brain-lung and lung-brain interactions and the impact of different old and recent modalities of treatment in the context of traumatic brain injury.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Acute brain injury increases pulmonary capillary permeability via sympathetic activation-mediated high fluid shear stress and destruction of the endothelial glycocalyx layer
    Na Zhao, Chao Liu, Xinxin Tian, Juan Yang, Tianen Wang
    Experimental Cell Research.2024; 434(2): 113873.     CrossRef
  • Oral administration of lysozyme protects against injury of ileum via modulating gut microbiota dysbiosis after severe traumatic brain injury
    Weijian Yang, Caihua Xi, Haijun Yao, Qiang Yuan, Jun Zhang, Qifang Chen, Gang Wu, Jin Hu
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ventilatory targets following brain injury
    Shaurya Taran, Sarah Wahlster, Chiara Robba
    Current Opinion in Critical Care.2023; 29(2): 41.     CrossRef
  • Uncertainty in Neurocritical Care: Recognizing Its Relevance for Clinical Decision Making
    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, William A. Florez-Perdomo, Tariq Janjua
    Indian Journal of Neurotrauma.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Targeted Nanocarriers Co-Opting Pulmonary Intravascular Leukocytes for Drug Delivery to the Injured Brain
    Jia Nong, Patrick M. Glassman, Jacob W. Myerson, Viviana Zuluaga-Ramirez, Alba Rodriguez-Garcia, Alvin Mukalel, Serena Omo-Lamai, Landis R. Walsh, Marco E. Zamora, Xijing Gong, Zhicheng Wang, Kartik Bhamidipati, Raisa Y. Kiseleva, Carlos H. Villa, Colin F
    ACS Nano.2023; 17(14): 13121.     CrossRef
  • Manejo postoperatorio de resección de tumores cerebrales en la unidad de cuidado intensivo
    Andrés Felipe Naranjo Ramírez, Álvaro de Jesús Medrano Areiza, Bryan Arango Sánchez, Juan Carlos Arango Martínez, Luis Fermín Naranjo Atehortúa
    Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modulation of MAPK/NF-κB Pathway and NLRP3 Inflammasome by Secondary Metabolites from Red Algae: A Mechanistic Study
    Asmaa Nabil-Adam, Mohamed L. Ashour, Mohamed Attia Shreadah
    ACS Omega.2023; 8(41): 37971.     CrossRef
  • American Association for the Surgery of Trauma/American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma clinical protocol for management of acute respiratory distress syndrome and severe hypoxemia
    Jason A. Fawley, Christopher J. Tignanelli, Nicole L. Werner, George Kasotakis, Samuel P. Mandell, Nina E. Glass, David J. Dries, Todd W. Costantini, Lena M. Napolitano
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery.2023; 95(4): 592.     CrossRef
  • Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and brain oxygenation in acute brain injury: Friend or foe? A scoping review
    Greta Zunino, Denise Battaglini, Daniel Agustin Godoy
    Journal of Intensive Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The role of cardiac dysfunction and post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in brain-lung interactions following traumatic brain injury
    Mabrouk Bahloul, Karama Bouchaala, Najeh Baccouche, Kamilia Chtara, Hedi Chelly, Mounir Bouaziz
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 266.     CrossRef
  • Allocation of Donor Lungs in Korea
    Hye Ju Yeo
    Journal of Chest Surgery.2022; 55(4): 274.     CrossRef
  • Mapping brain endophenotypes associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis genetic risk
    Ali-Reza Mohammadi-Nejad, Richard J. Allen, Luke M. Kraven, Olivia C. Leavy, R. Gisli Jenkins, Louise V. Wain, Dorothee P. Auer, Stamatios N. Sotiropoulos
    eBioMedicine.2022; 86: 104356.     CrossRef
  • Use of bedside ultrasound in the evaluation of acute dyspnea: a comprehensive review of evidence on diagnostic usefulness
    Ivan David Lozada-Martinez, Isabela Zenilma Daza-Patiño, Gerardo Jesus Farley Reina-González, Sebastián Rojas-Pava, Ailyn Zenith Angulo-Lara, María Paola Carmona-Rodiño, Olga Gissela Sarmiento-Najar, Jhon Mike Romero-Madera, Yesid Alonso Ángel-Hernandez
    Revista Investigación en Salud Universidad de Boyacá.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Diaphragm ultrasound as a better predictor of successful extubation from mechanical ventilation than rapid shallow breathing index
Mohammad Jhahidul Alam, Simanta Roy, Mohammad Azmain Iktidar, Fahmida Khatun Padma, Khairul Islam Nipun, Sreshtha Chowdhury, Ranjan Kumar Nath, Harun-Or Rashid
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):94-100.   Published online January 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01354
  • 5,750 View
  • 355 Download
  • 11 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
In 3%–19% of patients, reintubation is needed 48–72 hours following extubation, which increases intensive care unit (ICU) morbidity, mortality, and expenses. Extubation failure is frequently caused by diaphragm dysfunction. Ultrasonography can be used to determine the mobility and thickness of the diaphragm. This study looked at the role of diaphragm excursion (DE) and thickening fraction in predicting successful extubation from mechanical ventilation.
Methods
Thirty-one patients were extubated with the advice of an ICU consultant using the ICU weaning regimen and diaphragm ultrasonography was performed. Ultrasound DE and thickening fraction were measured three times: at the commencement of the t-piece experiment, at 10 minutes, and immediately before extubation. All patients' parameters were monitored for 48 hours after extubation. Rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) was also measured at the same time.
Results
Successful extubation was significantly correlated with DE (P=0.01). Receiver curve analysis for DE to predict successful extubation revealed good properties (area under the curve [AUC], 0.83; P<0.001); sensitivity, 77.8%; specificity, 84.6%, positive predictive value (PPV), 87.5%; negative predictive value (NPV), 73.3% while cut-off value, 11.43 mm. Diaphragm thickening fraction (DTF) also revealed moderate curve properties (AUC, 0.69; P=0.06); sensitivity, 61.1%; specificity, 84.6%; PPV, 87.5%; NPV, 61.1% with cut-off value 22.33% although former one was slightly better. RSBI could not reach good receiver operating characteristic value at cut-off points 100 b/min/L (AUC, 0.58; P=0.47); sensitivity, 66.7%; specificity, 53.8%; PPV, 66.7%; NPV, 53.8%).
Conclusions
To decrease the rate of reintubation, DE and DTF are better indicators of successful extubation. DE outperforms DTF.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Rapid shallow breathing index predicting extubation outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Donghui Jia, Hengyang Wang, Qian Wang, Wenrui Li, Xuhong Lan, Hongfang Zhou, Zhigang Zhang
    Intensive and Critical Care Nursing.2024; 80: 103551.     CrossRef
  • Ultrasonography to Access Diaphragm Dysfunction and Predict the Success of Mechanical Ventilation Weaning in Critical Care
    Marta Rafael Marques, José Manuel Pereira, José Artur Paiva, Gonzalo García de Casasola‐Sánchez, Yale Tung‐Chen
    Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine.2024; 43(2): 223.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Ultrasonography in the Process of Weaning from Mechanical Ventilation in Critically Ill Patients
    Lou’i Al-Husinat, Basil Jouryyeh, Ahlam Rawashdeh, Chiara Robba, Pedro Silva, Patricia Rocco, Denise Battaglini
    Diagnostics.2024; 14(4): 398.     CrossRef
  • Ultrasonographic Assessment of Diaphragmatic Function and Its Clinical Application in the Management of Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure
    Marina Saad, Stefano Pini, Fiammetta Danzo, Francesca Mandurino Mirizzi, Carmine Arena, Francesco Tursi, Dejan Radovanovic, Pierachille Santus
    Diagnostics.2023; 13(3): 411.     CrossRef
  • The ratio of respiratory rate to diaphragm thickening fraction for predicting extubation success
    Dararat Eksombatchai, Chalermwut Sukkratok, Yuda Sutherasan, Detajin Junhasavasdikul, Pongdhep Theerawit
    BMC Pulmonary Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of diaphragmatic ultrasound as a predictor of successful weaning from mechanical ventilation: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Henry M. Parada-Gereda, Adriana L. Tibaduiza, Alejandro Rico-Mendoza, Daniel Molano-Franco, Victor H. Nieto, Wanderley A. Arias-Ortiz, Purificación Perez-Terán, Joan R. Masclans
    Critical Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Value of Diaphragm Ultrasonography for Extubation: A Single-Blinded Randomized Clinical Trial
    T. G. Toledo, M. R. Bacci, Fred A. Luchette
    Critical Care Research and Practice.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Role of diaphragm ultrasound in weaning mechanically ventilated patients: A prospective observational study
    Ravi Saravanan, Krishnamurthy Nivedita, Krishnamoorthy Karthik, Rajagopalan Venkatraman
    Indian Journal of Anaesthesia.2022; 66(8): 591.     CrossRef
  • The role of diaphragmatic thickness measurement in weaning prediction and its comparison with rapid shallow breathing index: a single-center experience
    Lokesh Kumar Lalwani, Manjunath B Govindagoudar, Pawan Kumar Singh, Mukesh Sharma, Dhruva Chaudhry
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(3): 347.     CrossRef
  • Diaphragm ultrasound in weaning from mechanical ventilation: a last step to predict successful extubation?
    Domenica Di Costanzo, Mariano Mazza, Antonio Esquinas
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(4): 681.     CrossRef
  • Sonographic assessment of diaphragmatic thickening and excursion as predictors of weaning success in the intensive care unit: A prospective observational study
    Amandeep Kaur, Shruti Sharma, VikramP Singh, MRavi Krishna, ParshotamL Gautam, Gagandeep Singh
    Indian Journal of Anaesthesia.2022; 66(11): 776.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of assessment of diaphragm function using speckle tracking between patients with successful and failed weaning: a multicentre, observational, pilot study
    Qiancheng Xu, Xiao Yang, Yan Qian, Chang Hu, Weihua Lu, Shuhan Cai, Bo Hu, Jianguo Li
    BMC Pulmonary Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ultrasonographic assessment of diaphragmatic function in preterm infants on non-invasive neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NIV-NAVA) compared to nasal intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (NIPPV): a prospective observational study
    Mohamed Elkhouli, Liran Tamir-Hostovsky, Jenna Ibrahim, Nehad Nasef, Adel Mohamed
    European Journal of Pediatrics.2022; 182(2): 731.     CrossRef
Infection
Nosocomial meningitis in intensive care: a 10-year retrospective study and literature review
Sofia R. Valdoleiros, Cristina Torrão, Laura S. Freitas, Diana Mano, Celina Gonçalves, Carla Teixeira
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):61-70.   Published online January 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01151
  • 4,831 View
  • 252 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Nosocomial meningitis is a medical emergency that requires early diagnosis, prompt initiation of therapy, and frequent admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in adult patients diagnosed with nosocomial meningitis who required admission to the ICU between April 2010 and March 2020. Meningitis/ventriculitis and intracranial infection were defined according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Results: An incidence of 0.75% of nosocomial meningitis was observed among 70 patients. The mean patient age was 59 years and 34% were ≥65 years. Twenty-two percent of patients were in an immunocompromised state. A clear predisposing factor for nosocomial meningitis (traumatic brain injury, basal skull fracture, brain hemorrhage, central nervous system [CNS] invasive procedure or device) was present in 93% of patients. Fever was the most frequent clinical feature. A microbiological agent was identified in 30% of cases, of which 27% were bacteria, with a predominance of Gram-negative over Gram-positive. Complications developed in 47% of cases, 24% of patients were discharged with a Glasgow coma scale <14, and 37% died. There were no clear clinical predictors of complications. Advanced age (≥65 years old) and the presence of complications were associated with higher hospital mortality. Conclusions: Nosocomial meningitis in critical care has a low incidence rate but high mortality and morbidity. In critical care patients with CNS-related risk factors, a high level of suspicion for meningitis is warranted, but diagnosis can be hindered by several confounding factors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Procalcitonin As Diagnostic Tool for CNS Infections—Overall, Not Good Enough (Yet?)*
    Michael A. Pizzi, Katharina M. Busl
    Critical Care Medicine.2024; 52(1): 163.     CrossRef
  • A retrospective analysis of 20,178 adult neurological infection admissions to United Kingdom critical care units from 2001 to 2020
    Joseph Donovan, Abena Glover, John Gregson, Andrew W. Hitchings, Emma C. Wall, Robert S. Heyderman
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics, Treatment, and Outcomes of Veterans with Cerebrospinal Fluid Culture Positive for Gram-Negative Rod Bacteria: A Retrospective Analysis over 18 Years in 125 Veterans Health Administration Hospitals
    Shinya Hasegawa, Eiyu Matsumoto, Jennifer R. Carlson, Hiroyuki Suzuki
    Current Microbiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bacterial meningitis in adults: a retrospective study among 148 patients in an 8-year period in a university hospital, Finland
    Sakke Niemelä, Laura Lempinen, Eliisa Löyttyniemi, Jarmo Oksi, Jussi Jero
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Bacterial meningitis in children with an abnormal craniocerebral structure
    Jiali Pan, Wei Xu, Wenliang Song, Tao Zhang
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Fieber in der Intensivmedizin
    Jan-Hendrik Naendrup, Boris Böll, Jorge Garcia Borrega
    Intensivmedizin up2date.2023; 19(01): 17.     CrossRef
  • Neurosurgical management of penetrating brain injury during World War I: A historical cohort
    Rayan Fawaz, Mathilde Schmitt, Philémon Robert, Nathan Beucler, Jean-Marc Delmas, Nicolas Desse, Aurore Sellier, Arnaud Dagain
    Neurochirurgie.2023; 69(3): 101439.     CrossRef
  • Etiology and Outcomes of Healthcare-Associated Meningitis and Ventriculitis—A Single Center Cohort Study
    Hana Panic, Branimir Gjurasin, Marija Santini, Marko Kutlesa, Neven Papic
    Infectious Disease Reports.2022; 14(3): 420.     CrossRef
  • Healthcare-associated central nervous system infections
    Mariachiara Ippolito, Antonino Giarratano, Andrea Cortegiani
    Current Opinion in Anaesthesiology.2022; 35(5): 549.     CrossRef
Basic science and research
A machine learning model for predicting favorable outcome in severe traumatic brain injury patients after 6 months
Mehdi Nourelahi, Fardad Dadboud, Hosseinali Khalili, Amin Niakan, Hossein Parsaei
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):45-52.   Published online January 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00486
  • 3,736 View
  • 225 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which occurs commonly worldwide, is among the more costly of health and socioeconomic problems. Accurate prediction of favorable outcomes in severe TBI patients could assist with optimizing treatment procedures, predicting clinical outcomes, and result in substantial economic savings. Methods: In this study, we examined the capability of a machine learning-based model in predicting “favorable” or “unfavorable” outcomes after 6 months in severe TBI patients using only parameters measured on admission. Three models were developed using logistic regression, random forest, and support vector machines trained on parameters recorded from 2,381 severe TBI patients admitted to the neuro-intensive care unit of Rajaee (Emtiaz) Hospital (Shiraz, Iran) between 2015 and 2017. Model performance was evaluated using three indices: sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. A ten-fold cross-validation method was used to estimate these indices. Results: Overall, the developed models showed excellent performance with the area under the curve around 0.81, sensitivity and specificity of around 0.78. The top-three factors important in predicting 6-month post-trauma survival status in TBI patients are “Glasgow coma scale motor response,” “pupillary reactivity,” and “age.” Conclusions: Machine learning techniques might be used to predict the 6-month outcome in TBI patients using only the parameters measured on admission when the machine learning is trained using a large data set.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Enhancing hospital course and outcome prediction in patients with traumatic brain injury: A machine learning study
    Guangming Zhu, Burak B Ozkara, Hui Chen, Bo Zhou, Bin Jiang, Victoria Y Ding, Max Wintermark
    The Neuroradiology Journal.2024; 37(1): 74.     CrossRef
  • Machine Learning in Neuroimaging of Traumatic Brain Injury: Current Landscape, Research Gaps, and Future Directions
    Kevin Pierre, Jordan Turetsky, Abheek Raviprasad, Seyedeh Mehrsa Sadat Razavi, Michael Mathelier, Anjali Patel, Brandon Lucke-Wold
    Trauma Care.2024; 4(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Science fiction or clinical reality: a review of the applications of artificial intelligence along the continuum of trauma care
    Olivia F. Hunter, Frances Perry, Mina Salehi, Hubert Bandurski, Alan Hubbard, Chad G. Ball, S. Morad Hameed
    World Journal of Emergency Surgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gastrointestinal failure, big data and intensive care
    Pierre Singer, Eyal Robinson, Orit Raphaeli
    Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care.2023; 26(5): 476.     CrossRef
  • Prediction performance of the machine learning model in predicting mortality risk in patients with traumatic brain injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jue Wang, Ming Jing Yin, Han Chun Wen
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting return to work after traumatic brain injury using machine learning and administrative data
    Helena Van Deynse, Wilfried Cools, Viktor-Jan De Deken, Bart Depreitere, Ives Hubloue, Eva Kimpe, Maarten Moens, Karen Pien, Ellen Tisseghem, Griet Van Belleghem, Koen Putman
    International Journal of Medical Informatics.2023; 178: 105201.     CrossRef
  • Fluid-Based Protein Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury: The View from the Bedside
    Denes V. Agoston, Adel Helmy
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2023; 24(22): 16267.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Outcome in Patients with Brain Injury: Differences between Machine Learning versus Conventional Statistics
    Antonio Cerasa, Gennaro Tartarisco, Roberta Bruschetta, Irene Ciancarelli, Giovanni Morone, Rocco Salvatore Calabrò, Giovanni Pioggia, Paolo Tonin, Marco Iosa
    Biomedicines.2022; 10(9): 2267.     CrossRef
Infection
In-hospital mortality prediction using frailty scale and severity score in elderly patients with severe COVID-19
Yong Sub Na, Jin Hyoung Kim, Moon Seong Baek, Won-Young Kim, Ae-Rin Baek, Bo young Lee, Gil Myeong Seong, Song-I Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):303-311.   Published online July 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00017
  • 3,311 View
  • 210 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Elderly patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have a high disease severity and mortality. However, the use of the frailty scale and severity score to predict in-hospital mortality in the elderly is not well established. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of these scores in COVID-19 cases in the elderly.
Methods
This multicenter retrospective study included severe COVID-19 patients admitted to seven hospitals in Republic of Korea from February 2020 to February 2021. We evaluated patients’ Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score; confusion, urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure, 65 years of age and older (CURB-65) score; modified early warning score (MEWS); Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score; clinical frailty scale (CFS) score; and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). We evaluated the predictive value using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.
Results
The study included 318 elderly patients with severe COVID-19 of whom 237 (74.5%) were survivors and 81 (25.5%) were non-survivors. The non-survivor group was older and had more comorbidities than the survivor group. The CFS, CCI, APACHE II, SOFA, CURB-65, and MEWS scores were higher in the non-survivor group than in the survivor group. When analyzed using the ROC curve, SOFA score showed the best performance in predicting the prognosis of elderly patients (area under the curve=0.766, P<0.001). CFS and SOFA scores were associated with in-hospital mortality in the multivariate analysis.
Conclusions
The SOFA score is an efficient tool for assessing in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with severe COVID-19.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Omicron, Long-COVID, and the Safety of Elective Surgery for Adults and Children: Joint Guidance from the Therapeutics and Guidelines Committee of the Surgical Infection Society and the Surgery Strategic Clinical Network, Alberta Health Services
    Philip S. Barie, Mary E. Brindle, Rachel G. Khadaroo, Tara L. Klassen, Jared M. Huston
    Surgical Infections.2023; 24(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of risk scores as predictors of mortality and hospital length of stay for older COVID‐19 patients
    Banu Buyukaydin, Tahsin Karaaslan, Omer Uysal
    AGING MEDICINE.2023; 6(1): 56.     CrossRef
  • Atypical presentation of COVID-19 in older patients is associated with frailty but not with adverse outcomes
    Joy E. van Son, Elisabeth C. P. Kahn, Jessica M. van der Bol, Dennis G. Barten, Laura C. Blomaard, Carmen van Dam, Jacobien Ellerbroek, Steffy W. M. Jansen, Anita Lekx, Carolien M. J. van der Linden, Roy Looman, Huub A. A. M. Maas, Francesco U. S. Mattace
    European Geriatric Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Neurological Manifestations and Complications of the Central Nervous System as Risk Factors and Predictors of Mortality in Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19: A Cohort Study
    Ana Luisa Corona-Nakamura, Martha Judith Arias-Merino, Rayo Morfín-Otero, Guillermo Rodriguez-Zavala, Alfredo León-Gil, Juan Ramsés Camarillo-Escalera, Idarmis Brisseida Reyes-Cortés, María Gisela Valdovinos-Ortega, Erick René Nava-Escobar, Ana María de l
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(12): 4065.     CrossRef
  • Modified Early Warning Score: Clinical Deterioration of Mexican Patients Hospitalized with COVID-19 and Chronic Disease
    Nicolás Santiago González, María de Lourdes García-Hernández, Patricia Cruz-Bello, Lorena Chaparro-Díaz, María de Lourdes Rico-González, Yolanda Hernández-Ortega
    Healthcare.2023; 11(19): 2654.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors and Predictive Model for Mortality of Hospitalized COVID-19 Elderly Patients from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Thailand
    Mallika Chuansangeam, Bunyarat Srithan, Pattharawin Pattharanitima, Pawit Phadungsaksawasdi
    Medicines.2023; 10(11): 59.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Comparison of high-flow nasal oxygen therapy and noninvasive ventilation in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Glenardi Glenardi, Febie Chriestya, Bambang J Oetoro, Ghea Mangkuliguna, Natalia Natalia
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):71-83.   Published online February 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01326
  • 7,619 View
  • 450 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a major adverse event commonly encountered in severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Although noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has long been used in the management of ARF, it has several adverse events which may cause patient discomfort and lead to treatment complication. Recently, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has the potential to be an alternative for NIV in adults with ARF, including COVID-19 patients. The objective was to investigate the efficacy of HFNC compared to NIV in COVID-19 patients. Methods: This meta-analysis was reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria. Literature search was carried out in electronic databases for relevant articles published prior to June 2021. The protocol used in this study has been registered in International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (CRD42020225186). Results: Although the success rate of NIV is higher compared to HFNC (odds ratio [OR], 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16–0.97; P=0.04), this study showed that the mortality in the NIV group is also significantly higher compared to HFNC group (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.39–0.63; P<0.001). Moreover, this study also demonstrated that there was no significant difference in intubation rates between the two groups (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 0.86–2.11; P=0.19). Conclusions: Patients treated with HFNC showed better outcomes compared to NIV for ARF due to COVID-19. Therefore, HFNC should be considered prior to NIV in COVID-19–associated ARF. However, further studies with larger sample sizes are still needed to better elucidate the benefit of HFNC in COVID-19 patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • High-flow nasal cannula therapy in patients with COVID-19 in intensive care units in a country with limited resources: a single-center experience
    Anh-Minh Vu Phan, Hai-Yen Thi Hoang, Thanh-Son Truong Do, Trung Quoc Hoang, Thuan Van Phan, Nguyet-Anh Phuong Huynh, Khoi Minh Le
    Journal of International Medical Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluating the use of the respiratory-rate oxygenation index as a predictor of high-flow nasal cannula oxygen failure in COVID-19
    Scott Weerasuriya, Savvas Vlachos, Ahmed Bobo, Namitha Birur Jayaprabhu, Lauren Matthews, Adam R Blackstock, Victoria Metaxa
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(1): 31.     CrossRef
  • Does the variant positivity and negativity affect the clinical course in COVID-19?: A cohort study
    Erkan Yildirim, Levent Kilickan, Suleyman Hilmi Aksoy, Ramazan Gozukucuk, Hasan Huseyin Kilic, Yakup Tomak, Orhan Dalkilic, Ibrahim Halil Tanboga, Fevzi Duhan Berkan Kilickan
    Medicine.2023; 102(9): e33132.     CrossRef
  • The COVID-19 Driving Force: How It Shaped the Evidence of Non-Invasive Respiratory Support
    Yorschua Jalil, Martina Ferioli, Martin Dres
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(10): 3486.     CrossRef
  • Descriptive account of the first use of the LeVe CPAP System, a new frugal CPAP System, in adult patients with COVID-19 Pneumonitis in Uganda
    Anna Littlejohns, Helen Please, Racheal Musasizi, Stuart Murdoch, Gorret Nampiina, Ian Waters, William Davis Birch, Gregory de Boer, Nikil Kapur, Tumwesigye Ambrozi, Ninsiima Carol, Nakigudde Noel, Jiten Parmar, Peter Culmer, Tom Lawton, Edith Namulema
    Tropical Medicine and Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison between high-flow nasal cannula and noninvasive ventilation in COVID-19 patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yun Peng, Bing Dai, Hong-wen Zhao, Wei Wang, Jian Kang, Hai-jia Hou, Wei Tan
    Therapeutic Advances in Respiratory Disease.2022; 16: 175346662211136.     CrossRef
Pediatrics
Multicenter validation of a deep-learning-based pediatric early-warning system for prediction of deterioration events
Yunseob Shin, Kyung-Jae Cho, Yeha Lee, Yu Hyeon Choi, Jae Hwa Jung, Soo Yeon Kim, Yeo Hyang Kim, Young A Kim, Joongbum Cho, Seong Jong Park, Won Kyoung Jhang
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):654-666.   Published online October 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00976
  • 2,312 View
  • 168 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Early recognition of deterioration events is crucial to improve clinical outcomes. For this purpose, we developed a deep-learning-based pediatric early-warning system (pDEWS) and aimed to validate its clinical performance. Methods: This is a retrospective multicenter cohort study including five tertiary-care academic children’s hospitals. All pediatric patients younger than 19 years admitted to the general ward from January 2019 to December 2019 were included. Using patient electronic medical records, we evaluated the clinical performance of the pDEWS for identifying deterioration events defined as in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) and unexpected general ward-to-pediatric intensive care unit transfer (UIT) within 24 hours before event occurrence. We also compared pDEWS performance to those of the modified pediatric early-warning score (PEWS) and prediction models using logistic regression (LR) and random forest (RF). Results: The study population consisted of 28,758 patients with 34 cases of IHCA and 291 cases of UIT. pDEWS showed better performance for predicting deterioration events with a larger area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, fewer false alarms, a lower mean alarm count per day, and a smaller number of cases needed to examine than the modified PEWS, LR, or RF models regardless of site, event occurrence time, age group, or sex. Conclusions: The pDEWS outperformed modified PEWS, LR, and RF models for early and accurate prediction of deterioration events regardless of clinical situation. This study demonstrated the potential of pDEWS as an efficient screening tool for efferent operation of rapid response teams.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Predicting cardiac arrest after neonatal cardiac surgery
    Alexis L. Benscoter, Mark A. Law, Santiago Borasino, A. K. M. Fazlur Rahman, Jeffrey A. Alten, Mihir R. Atreya
    Intensive Care Medicine – Paediatric and Neonatal.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Volumetric regional MRI and neuropsychological predictors of motor task variability in cognitively unimpaired, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and probable Alzheimer's disease older adults
    Michael Malek-Ahmadi, Kevin Duff, Kewei Chen, Yi Su, Jace B. King, Vincent Koppelmans, Sydney Y. Schaefer
    Experimental Gerontology.2023; 173: 112087.     CrossRef
  • Predicting sepsis using deep learning across international sites: a retrospective development and validation study
    Michael Moor, Nicolas Bennett, Drago Plečko, Max Horn, Bastian Rieck, Nicolai Meinshausen, Peter Bühlmann, Karsten Borgwardt
    eClinicalMedicine.2023; 62: 102124.     CrossRef
  • A model study for the classification of high-risk groups for cardiac arrest in general ward patients using simulation techniques
    Seok Young Song, Won-Kee Choi, Sanggyu Kwak
    Medicine.2023; 102(37): e35057.     CrossRef
  • An advanced pediatric early warning system: a reliable sentinel, not annoying extra work
    Young Joo Han
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(4): 667.     CrossRef
Case Report
Neurosurgery
What should an intensivist know about pneumocephalus and tension pneumocephalus?
Bhushan Sudhakar Wankhade, Maged Mohsen Kamel Beniamein, Zeyad Faoor Alrais, Jyoti Ittoop Mathew, Ghaya Zeyad Alrais
Acute Crit Care. 2023;38(2):244-248.   Published online April 13, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01102
  • 11,342 View
  • 314 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Collection of air in the cranial cavity is called pneumocephalus. Although simple pneumocephalus is a benign condition, accompanying increased intracranial pressure can produce a life-threatening condition comparable to tension pneumothorax, which is termed tension pneumocephalus. We report a case of tension pneumocephalus after drainage of a cerebrospinal fluid hygroma. The tension pneumocephalus was treated with decompression craniotomy, but the patient later died due to the complications related to critical care. Traumatic brain injury and neurosurgical intervention are the most common causes of pneumocephalus. Pneumocephalus and tension pneumocephalus are neurosurgical emergencies, and anesthetics and intensive care management like the use of nitrous oxide during anesthesia and positive pressure ventilation have important implications in their development and progress. Clinically, patients can present with various nonspecific neurological manifestations that are indistinguishable from a those of a primary neurological condition. If the diagnosis is questionable, patients should be investigated using computed tomography of the brain. Immediate neurosurgical consultation with decompression is the treatment of choice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sudden-onset, non-traumatic large volume pneumocephalus following presentation of acute bacterial meningitis
    Alexandra Krez, Michael Malinzak, Colby Feeney
    BMJ Case Reports.2024; 17(1): e256194.     CrossRef
  • Pneumocephalus; a rare cause of coma
    Elisavet Simoulidou, Vivian Georgopoulou, Panagiotis Kalmoukos, Dimitrios Kouroupis, Nikoleta Moscha, Maria Sidiropoulou, Sofia Chatzimichailidou, Konstantinos Petidis, Athina Pyrpasopoulou
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2023; 68: 215.e1.     CrossRef
  • Pneumocephalus secondary to epidural analgesia: a case report
    Maira Ahmad, Shannay Bellamy, William Ott, Rany Mekhail
    Journal of Medical Case Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Transnasal Endoscopic Treatment of Tension Pneumocephalus Caused by Posttraumatic or Iatrogenic Ethmoidal Damage
    Goran Latif Omer, Riccardo Maurizi, Beatrice Francavilla, Kareem Rekawt Hama Rashid, Gianluca Velletrani, Hasan Mustafa Salah, Giulia Marzocchella, Mohammed Ibrahim Mohialdeen Gubari, Stefano Di Girolamo, Rong-San Jiang
    Case Reports in Otolaryngology.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Tension pneumocephalus as a complication of surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: case report and literature review
    Mohammed A. Azab, Ahmed Hazem, Brandon Lucke-Wold
    Exploration of Neuroprotective Therapy.2023; 3(4): 177.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Neurosurgery
Development and internal validation of a nomogram for predicting outcomes in children with traumatic subdural hematoma
Anukoon Kaewborisutsakul, Thara Tunthanathip
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):429-437.   Published online June 23, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01795
  • 2,174 View
  • 206 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
A subdural hematoma (SDH) following a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children can lead to unexpected death or disability. The nomogram is a clinical prediction tool used by physicians to provide prognosis advice to parents for making decisions regarding treatment. In the present study, a nomogram for predicting outcomes was developed and validated. In addition, the predictors associated with outcomes in children with traumatic SDH were determined.
Methods
In this retrospective study, 103 children with SDH after TBI were evaluated. According to the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury classification, the functional outcomes were assessed at hospital discharge and categorized into favorable and unfavorable. The predictors associated with the unfavorable outcomes were analyzed using binary logistic regression. Subsequently, a two-dimensional nomogram was developed for presentation of the predictive model.
Results
The predictive model with the lowest level of Akaike information criterion consisted of hypotension (odds ratio [OR], 9.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0–42.9), Glasgow coma scale scores of 3–8 (OR, 8.2; 95% CI, 1.7–38.9), fixed pupil in one eye (OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 2.6–8.8), and fixed pupils in both eyes (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.6–7.1). A midline shift ≥5 mm (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.62–10.73) and co-existing intraventricular hemorrhage (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 0.003–26.1) were also included.
Conclusions
SDH in pediatric TBI can lead to mortality and disability. The predictability level of the nomogram in the present study was excellent, and external validation should be conducted to confirm the performance of the clinical prediction tool.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prognostic factors and clinical nomogram for in-hospital mortality in traumatic brain injury
    Thara Tunthanathip, Nakornchai Phuenpathom, Apisorn Jongjit
    The American Journal of Emergency Medicine.2024; 77: 194.     CrossRef
  • Prediction performance of the machine learning model in predicting mortality risk in patients with traumatic brain injuries: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jue Wang, Ming Jing Yin, Han Chun Wen
    BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and internal validation of a nomogram to predict massive blood transfusions in neurosurgical operations
    Kanisorn Sungkaro, Chin Taweesomboonyat, Anukoon Kaewborisutsakul
    Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice.2022; 13: 711.     CrossRef
  • Prediction of massive transfusions in neurosurgical operations using machine learning
    Chin Taweesomboonyat, Anukoon Kaewborisutsakul, Kanisorn Sungkaro
    Asian Journal of Transfusion Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Neurology
Cytokine profiles in intensive care unit delirium
Ryan J. Smith, Christian Lachner, Vijay P. Singh, Shubham Trivedi, Biswajit Khatua, Rodrigo Cartin-Ceba
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):415-428.   Published online June 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01508
  • 4,043 View
  • 178 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Neuroinflammation causing disruption of the blood-brain barrier and immune cell extravasation into the brain parenchyma may cause delirium; however, knowledge of the exact pathophysiologic mechanism remains incomplete. The purpose of our study was to determine whether cytokine profiles differ depending on whether delirium occurs in the setting of sepsis, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), or recent surgery.
Methods
This prospective observational cohort study involved 119 critically ill patients admitted to a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) during 2019 and 2020. Delirium was identified using the validated confusion assessment method for the ICU. Multiple delirium risk factors were collected daily including clinical characteristics, hospital course, lab values, vital signs, surgical exposure, drug exposure, and COVID-19 characteristics. Serums samples were collected within 12 hours of ICU admission and cytokine levels were measured.
Results
The following proinflammatory cytokines were elevated in our delirium population: tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-18, C-C motif ligand (CCL) 2, CCL3, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL)1, CXCL10, IL-8, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and IL-10. Analysis of relative cytokine levels in those patients that developed delirium in the setting of sepsis, COVID-19, and recent surgery showed elevations of CCL2, CXCL10, and TNF-α in both the sepsis and COVID-19 group in comparison to the postsurgical population. In the postsurgical group, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was elevated and CXCL10 was decreased relative to the opposing groups.
Conclusions
We identify several cytokines and precipitating factors known to be associated with delirium. However, our study suggests that the cytokine profile associated with delirium is variable and contingent upon delirium precipitating factors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association of postoperative delirium with serum and cerebrospinal fluid proteomic profiles: a prospective cohort study in older hip fracture patients
    Lucía Lozano-Vicario, Ángel Javier Muñoz-Vázquez, Robinson Ramírez-Vélez, Arkaitz Galbete-Jiménez, Joaquín Fernández-Irigoyen, Enrique Santamaría, Bernardo Abel Cedeno-Veloz, Fabricio Zambom-Ferraresi, Barbara C. Van Munster, José Ramón Ortiz-Gómez, Ángel
    GeroScience.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of peripheral B cells and delirium: combined single-cell sequencing and Mendelian randomization analysis
    Siyou Tan, Sining Pan, Lai Wei, Wenyan Chen, Bingbing Pan, Gaoyin Kong, Jing Chen, Yubo Xie
    Frontiers in Neurology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Brain injury biomarkers do not predict delirium in acutely ill older patients: a prospective cohort study
    Júlio César Garcia de Alencar, Flávia Barreto Garcez, Agnes Araujo Sardinha Pinto, Lucas Oliveira Junqueira e Silva, Lucas de Moraes Soler, Shirley Steffany Muñoz Fernandez, Victor Van Vaisberg, Luz Marina Gomez Gomez, Sandra Maria Lima Ribeiro, Thiago Ju
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systemic interleukin-6 inhibition ameliorates acute neuropsychiatric phenotypes in a murine model of acute lung injury
    Faizan Anwar, Nicklaus A. Sparrow, Mohammad Harun Rashid, Gena Guidry, Michael M. Gezalian, Eric J. Ley, Maya Koronyo-Hamaoui, Itai Danovitch, E. Wesley Ely, S. Ananth Karumanchi, Shouri Lahiri
    Critical Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Review Article
Basic science and research
Review of remimazolam and sedatives in the intensive care unit
Hey-Ran Choi, In-Ae Song
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):151-158.   Published online May 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00619
  • 4,241 View
  • 334 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Remimazolam is a novel intravenous ultra-short acting benzodiazepine that has the potential of being a safe and effective new sedative for use in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Because remimazolam metabolizes rapidly by being hydrolyzed to an inactive metabolite (CNS 7054) through non-specific tissue esterase activity, specific dosing adjustment for older adults and for patients with renal or hepatic impairment patients (except for those with severe hepatic impairment) is not required. In addition, research has shown that remimazolam may be reversed by administration of flumazenil, as its half time was sufficiently short compared to flumazenil. It shows a lower incidence of cardiorespiratory depression, less injection pain, and no fatal complications such as propofol infusion syndrome and malignant hyperthermia of inhalational anesthetics. Future studies to study the suitability of remimazolam for managing the sedation of ICU patients who need sedation for a long time over several days is required.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Remimazolam: A New Ingress in Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit
    Minati Choudhury, Poonam Malhotra Kapoor
    Journal of Cardiac Critical Care TSS.2023; 7: 133.     CrossRef
  • Safety and efficacy of remimazolam tosilate combined with low-dose fentanyl for procedural sedation in obese patients undergoing gastroscopy: study protocol for a single-centre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial
    Lijuan Yan, Xiao Wang, Zhenyi Chen, Ningning Wu, Hao Li, Bin Yang
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(12): e079095.     CrossRef
  • Remimazolam: An Updated Review of a New Sedative and Anaesthetic
    Qinxue Hu, Xing Liu, Chengli Wen, Duo Li, Xianying Lei
    Drug Design, Development and Therapy.2022; Volume 16: 3957.     CrossRef
  • Análisis nacional de la sedación aplicada en pacientes de cuidados críticos
    Grace Pamela López Pérez, Melani Dayana Carrera Casa, Gissela Lizbeth Amancha Moyulema, Yadira Nathaly Chicaiza Quilligana, Ana Belén Guamán Tacuri, Joselyn Mireya Iza Arias
    Salud, Ciencia y Tecnología.2022; 2(S1): 234.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Nursing
The effect of time management education on critical care nurses’ prioritization: a randomized clinical trial
Fatemeh Vizeshfar, Mahnaz Rakhshan, Fatemeh Shirazi, Roya Dokoohaki
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):202-208.   Published online April 28, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01123
  • 6,315 View
  • 378 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
necessiBackground: Nurses are at the forefront of patient care, and time management skills can increase their ability to make decisions faster. This study aimed to assess the effect of a time management workshop on prioritization and time management skills among nurses of emergency and intensive care units.
Methods
This randomized clinical trial was performed with 215 nurses. The educational intervention about time management was held in the form of a workshop for the intervention group. The time management questionnaire was completed by both groups before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention.
Results
Most participants were female (n=191, 88%), with a mean age of 31.82 years (range, 22–63 years). Additionally, the participants’ work experience ranged from 1 to 30 years (mean±standard deviation, 8.00±7.15 years). After the intervention, the mean score of time management increased significantly in the intervention group, but no significant difference was observed in this regard in the control group. The results also revealed a significant difference between the intervention and control groups regarding the mean score of time management 3 months after the intervention (P<0.001).
Conclusions
Time management training helped nurses adjust the time required to perform and prioritize various tasks.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Nursing core competencies for postresuscitation care in Iran: a qualitative study
    Mahnaz Zali, Azad Rahmani, Kelly Powers, Hadi Hassankhani, Hossein Namdar-Areshtanab, Neda Gilani
    BMJ Open.2024; 14(1): e074614.     CrossRef
  • Impact of time management program on stress and coping strategies adopted by nursing students with regard to academic performance
    Juby Mary Chacko, Achamma Varghese, Nirmala Rajesh
    IP Journal of Paediatrics and Nursing Science.2023; 6(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Perceived clinical competence and predictive role of time management in nursing students
    Maryam Behdarvand, Mehrnaz Ahmadi, Nasrin Khajeali
    Nurse Education in Practice.2023; 72: 103789.     CrossRef
  • Examining the impact of time management and resilience training on work-family conflict among Iranian female nurses: a randomized controlled trial
    Sedigheh Peykar, Hakimeh Vahedparast, Tayebeh Gharibi, Razieh Bagherzadeh
    BMC Nursing.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
The role of nafamostat mesilate as a regional anticoagulant during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
Jae Ha Lee, Jin Han Park, Ji Hoon Jang, Se Hun Kim, Sung Yong Hong, Woon Heo, Dong-Hwan Lee, Hye Sook Choi, Ki Hoon Kim, Hang-Jea Jang
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):177-184.   Published online April 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01312
  • 3,357 View
  • 245 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Anticoagulation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) usually is required to prevent thrombosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the usefulness of nafamostat mesilate (NM) as a regional anticoagulant during veno-arterial ECMO (VA-ECMO) treatment. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 16 patients receiving VA-ECMO and NM from January 2017 to June 2020 at Haeundae Paik Hospital. We compared clinical and laboratory data, including activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), which was measured simultaneously in patients and the ECMO site, to estimate the efficacy of regional anticoagulation. Results: The median patient age was 68.5 years, and 56.3% of patients were men. Cardiovascular disease was the most common primary disease (75.0%) requiring ECMO treatment, followed by respiratory disease (12.5%). The median duration of ECMO treatment was 7.5 days. Among 16 patients, seven were switched to NM after first using heparin as an anticoagulation agent, and nine received only NM. When comparing aPTT values in the NM group between patients and the ECMO site, that in patients was significantly lower than that at the ECMO site (73.57 vs. 79.25 seconds; P=0.010); in contrast, no difference was observed in the heparin group. Conclusions: NM showed efficacy as a regional anticoagulation method by sustaining a lower aPTT value compared to that measured at the ECMO site. NM should be considered as a safer regional anticoagulation method in VA-ECMO for patients at high risk of bleeding.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Approach to Decompensated Right Heart Failure in the Acute Setting
    Catherine V. Levitt, Caitlin A. Williams, Jalil Ahari, Ali Pourmand
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(3): 869.     CrossRef
  • Critical Care Management of Severe Asthma Exacerbations
    Shameek Gayen, Stephen Dachert, Bilal Lashari, Matthew Gordon, Parag Desai, Gerard Criner, Juan Cardet, Kartik Shenoy
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2024; 13(3): 859.     CrossRef
  • Anticoagulants in adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: alternatives to standardized anticoagulation with unfractionated heparin
    Shu Tang, Liqing Xu, Hui Li, Zhanshen Wu, Qiang Wen
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.2023; 79(12): 1583.     CrossRef
  • Management of cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in surgery for active infective endocarditis
    Takahiro Yamazato, Hiroshi Munakata, Yutaka Okita
    Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Ethics
Changes in the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after implementation of the Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions Act
Hyunjae Im, Hyun Woo Choe, Seung-Young Oh, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):237-246.   Published online February 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01095
  • 3,507 View
  • 192 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
The Life-Sustaining Treatment (LST) Decisions Act allows withholding and withdrawal of LST, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In the present study, the incidence of CPR before and after implementation of the Act was compared.
Methods
This was a retrospective review involving hospitalized patients who underwent CPR at a single center between February 2016 and January 2020 (pre-implementation period, February 2016 to January 2018; post-implementation period, February 2018 to January 2020). The primary outcome was monthly incidence of CPR per 1,000 admissions. The secondary outcomes were duration of CPR, return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) rate, 24-hour survival rate, and survival-to-discharge rate. The study outcomes were compared before and after implementation of the Act.
Results
A total of 867 patients who underwent CPR was included in the analysis. The incidence of CPR per 1,000 admissions showed no significant difference before and after implementation of the Act (3.02±0.68 vs. 2.81±0.75, P=0.255). The ROSC rate (67.20±0.11 vs. 70.99±0.12, P=0.008) and survival to discharge rate (20.24±0.09 vs. 22.40±0.12, P=0.029) were higher after implementation of the Act than before implementation.
Conclusions
The incidence of CPR did not significantly change for 2 years after implementation of the Act. Further studies are needed to assess the changes in trends in the decisions of CPR and other LSTs in real-world practice.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients with do-not-resuscitate and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment in a medical intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study
    Song-I Lee, Ye-Rin Ju, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the end-of-life decisions of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia after the enforcement of the life-sustaining treatment decision act in Korea
    Ae-Rin Baek, Sang-Bum Hong, Soohyun Bae, Hye Kyeong Park, Changhwan Kim, Hyun-Kyung Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Jin Hyoung Kim, Youjin Chang, Heung Bum Lee, Hyun-Il Gil, Beomsu Shin, Kwang Ha Yoo, Jae Young Moon, Jee Youn Oh, Kyung Hoon Min, Kyeongman Jeon, Moon S
    BMC Medical Ethics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Will implementation of the Life-sustaining Treatment Decisions Act reduce the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation?
    In-Ae Song
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 256.     CrossRef
  • Effect of life-sustaining treatment decision law on pediatric in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation rate: A Korean population-based study
    Jaeyoung Choi, Ah Young Choi, Esther Park, Meong Hi Son, Joongbum Cho
    Resuscitation.2022; 180: 38.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care