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Original Article
Pulmonary
Effects of high-flow nasal cannula in patients with mild to moderate hypercapnia: a prospective observational study
Kyung Hun Nam, Hyung Koo Kang, Sung-Soon Lee, So-Hee Park, Sung Wook Kang, Jea Jun Hwang, So Young Park, Won Young Kim, Hee Jung Suh, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):249-255.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01102
  • 6,201 View
  • 249 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Evidence for using high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in hypercapnia is still limited. Most of the clinical studies had been conducted retrospectively, and there had been conflicting reports for the effects of HFNC on hypercapnia correction in prospective studies. Therefore, more evidence is needed to understand the effect of the HFNC in hypercapnia.
Methods
We conducted a multicenter prospective observational study after applying HFNC to 45 hospitalized subjects who had moderate hypercapnia (arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO2], 43–70 mm Hg) without severe respiratory acidosis (pH <7.30). The primary outcome was a change in PaCO2 level in the first 24 hours of HFNC use. The secondary outcomes were changes in other parameters of arterial blood gas analysis, changes in respiration rates, and clinical outcomes.
Results
There was a significant decrease in PaCO2 in the first hour of HFNC application (-3.80 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6.35 to -1.24; P<0.001). Reduction of PaCO2 was more prominent in subjects who did not have underlying obstructive lung disease. There was a correction in pH, but no significant changes in respiratory rate, bicarbonate, and arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio. Mechanical ventilation was not required for 93.3% (42/45) of our study population.
Conclusions
We suggest that HFNC could be a safe alternative for oxygen delivery in hypercapnia patients who do not need immediate mechanical ventilation. With HFNC oxygenation, correction of hypercapnia could be expected, especially in patients who do not have obstructive lung diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and efficacy of high flow nasal canula in patients with mild hypercapnia
    Mohammed A. Ibrahim, Magdy Emara, Mohammed Shehta
    The Egyptian Journal of Bronchology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannula: Evaluation of the perceptions of various performance aspects among Chinese clinical staff and establishment of a multidimensional clinical evaluation system
    Ruoxuan Wen, Xingshuo Hu, Tengchen Wei, Kaifei Wang, Zhimei Duan, Zhanqi Zhao, Lixin Xie, Fei Xie
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application Progress of HFNC in Respiratory Diseases
    迪 吴
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(11): 10617.     CrossRef
Erratum
Pulmonary
Erratum to “Global and regional ventilation during high flow nasal cannula in patients with hypoxia”
Dong Hyun Lee, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Hee Jung Suh, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):173-173.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00507.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2018;33(1):7
  • 2,727 View
  • 64 Download
PDF
Editorial
Surgery
Identification of risk factors for mortality in COVID-19 patients
Eun Young Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(4):296-297.   Published online November 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00850
  • 3,367 View
  • 106 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
PDF

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparison of characteristics and ventilatory course between coronavirus disease 2019 and Middle East respiratory syndrome patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Imran Khalid, Romaysaa M Yamani, Maryam Imran, Muhammad Ali Akhtar, Manahil Imran, Rumaan Gul, Tabindeh Jabeen Khalid, Ghassan Y Wali
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(3): 223.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Cardiology
Predictors and outcomes of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy in critically ill patients
Myung Jin Song, Sang Hoon Lee, Ah Young Leem, Song Yee Kim, Kyung Soo Chung, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Young Sam Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):67-76.   Published online May 15, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00024
  • 6,765 View
  • 217 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) occurs frequently in critically ill patients, but the clinical features and prognostic impact of SIC on sepsis outcome remain controversial. Here, we investigated the predictors and outcomes of SIC.
Methods
Patients admitted to a single medical intensive care unit from June 2016 to September 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. SIC was diagnosed by ejection fraction (EF) <50% and ≥10% decrease in baseline EF that recovered within 2 weeks.
Results
In total, 342 patients with sepsis met the inclusion criteria, and 49 patients (14.3%) were diagnosed with SIC; the latter were compared with 259 patients whose EF was not deteriorated by sepsis (non-SIC). Low systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD) were identified as predictors of SIC. SIC and non-SIC patients did not differ significantly in terms of 28-day all-cause mortality (24.5% vs. 26.3%, P=0.936). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidential interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.18; P=0.009) and delta neutrophil index (DNI; HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.08; P=0.026) were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality with SIC. DNI, APACHE II, and lactate were identified as risk factors for 28-day mortality in sepsis patients as a whole.
Conclusions
SIC was not associated with increased mortality compared to non-SIC. Low systolic blood pressure and increased LVEDD were predictors of SIC. High APACHE II score and elevated DNI, which reflect sepsis severity, predict 28-day all-cause mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Testosterone and soluble ST2 as mortality predictive biomarkers in male patients with sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy
    Lu Wang, Wen Dai, Ruiyao Zhu, Tingting Long, Zhaocai Zhang, Zhenju Song, Sucheng Mu, Shasha Wang, Huijuan Wang, Jiaxi Lei, Jing Zhang, Wenfang Xia, Guang Li, Wenwei Gao, Handong Zou, Yan Li, Liying Zhan
    Frontiers in Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Meta-Analysis of Initial Natriuretic Peptides in the Setting of Sepsis-Induced Myocardial Dysfunction
    Boyong He, Xin Wang, Liguo Shi, Hongbin Cheng, Luyi Zhao
    Biomarkers in Medicine.2024; 18(4): 145.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Prognosis of Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Daisuke Hasegawa, Yoshiko Ishisaka, Tetsuro Maeda, Narut Prasitlumkum, Kazuki Nishida, Siddharth Dugar, Ryota Sato
    Journal of Intensive Care Medicine.2023; 38(9): 797.     CrossRef
  • Research Progress on the Mechanism and Management of Septic Cardiomyopathy: A Comprehensive Review
    Xue-Bin Pei, Bo Liu, Maciej Dyrbuś
    Emergency Medicine International.2023; 2023: 1.     CrossRef
  • Biomarkers to Predict Multiorgan Distress Syndrome and Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Surgical Patients
    In Sik Shin, Da Kyung Kim, Sanghyun An, Sung Chan Gong, Moo Hyun Kim, Md Habibur Rahman, Cheol-Su Kim, Joon Hyeong Sohn, Kwangmin Kim, Hoon Ryu
    Medicina.2023; 59(12): 2054.     CrossRef
  • Risk factors of postoperative septic cardiomyopathy in perioperative sepsis patients
    Yuchang Xin, Ying Ge, Liuhui Chang, Yong Ni, Hairui Liu, Jiang Zhu
    BMC Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of milrinone versus placebo on hemodynamic in patients with septic shock: A randomize control trial
    Suratee Chobngam, Surat Tongyoo
    Clinical Critical Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy and mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Yu-Min Lin, Mei-Chuan Lee, Han Siong Toh, Wei-Ting Chang, Sih-Yao Chen, Fang-Hsiu Kuo, Hsin-Ju Tang, Yi-Ming Hua, Dongmei Wei, Jesus Melgarejo, Zhen-Yu Zhang, Chia-Te Liao
    Annals of Intensive Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy and Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    Yu-Min Lin, Mei-Chuan Lee, Han Siong Toh, Wei-Ting Chang, Sih-Yao Chen, Fang-Hsiu Kuo, Hsin-Ju Tang, Yi-Ming Hua, Dongmei Wei, Jesus Melgarejo, Zhen-Yu Zhang, Chia-Te Liao
    SSRN Electronic Journal .2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy is associated with higher mortality rates in patients with sepsis
    Balaram Krishna J Hanumanthu, Anika Sasidharan Nair, Adarsh Katamreddy, Jason S Gilbert, Jee Young You, Obiageli Lynda Offor, Ankit Kushwaha, Ankita Krishnan, Marzio Napolitano, Leonidas Palaidimos, Joaquin Morante, Seema S. Tekwani, Suchita Mehta, Aancha
    Acute and Critical Care.2021; 36(3): 215.     CrossRef
  • The Correlation Between Whole Blood Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) Levels and Cu/Zn Ratio and Sepsis-Induced Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (SILVSD) in Patients with Septic Shock: A Single-Center Prospective Observational Study
    Jian-Biao Meng, Ma-Hong Hu, Ming Zhang, Gong-Pai Hu, Wei Zhang, Shen-Jiang Hu
    International Journal of General Medicine.2021; Volume 14: 7219.     CrossRef
Rapid response system
Utilization of a rapid response team and associated outcomes in patients with malignancy
Jongmin Lee, Woo Ho Ban, Sei Won Kim, Eun Young Kim, Mi Ra Han, Seok Chan Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(1):16-23.   Published online February 29, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00675
  • 5,514 View
  • 137 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment have improved long-term outcomes in cancer patients. As a result, the requirement for a rapid response team (RRT) for cancer patients is also increasing. This study aimed to analyze utilization of an RRT and the associations between related factors and mortality in a population of cancer patients. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included hospitalized patients at a single academic medical center in Seoul, Korea, who required RRT activation during a 6-year period from June 2013 to December 2018. Results: Overall, 164 of the 457 patients who met the above criteria were cancer patients, and they had a significantly higher Charlson comorbidity score than the non-cancer patients (5.0 vs. 7.0, P<0.001). A significantly larger proportion of cancer patients required intensive care unit transfer (51.8% vs. 41.0%, P=0.032). Cancer patients also had significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared with other patients (39.6% vs. 10.9%, P<0.001). Furthermore, presence of cancer was independently associated with in-hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 3.93). Among cancer patients, higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II at the time of RRT activation was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality regardless of malignancy (adjusted OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.15). Conclusions: Cancer patients requiring RRT activation have significantly higher rates of inhospital mortality than patients not using RRT. Higher severity score at the time of RRT activation in patients with malignancy was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Intensivmedizinisches Kontinuum in der Versorgung von Krebskranken
    Catherina Lück
    InFo Hämatologie + Onkologie.2023; 26(5): 10.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients screened by rapid response team who transferred to the intensive care unit
    Song-I. Lee, Jeong Suk Koh, Yoon Joo Kim, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Emergency Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Characteristics and Prognosis of Hospitalized Patients at High Risk of Deterioration Identified by the Rapid Response System: a Multicenter Cohort Study
    Sang Hyuk Kim, Ji Young Hong, Youlim Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Novel Adaptive T-Cell Oncological Treatments Lead to New Challenges for Medical Emergency Teams: A 2-Year Experience From a Tertiary-Care Hospital in Switzerland
    Anna Sarah Messmer, Yok-Ai Que, Christoph Schankin, Yara Banz, Ulrike Bacher, Urban Novak, Thomas Pabst
    Critical Care Explorations.2021; 3(10): e0552.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of second-tier rapid response activations in a tertiary referral hospital: A prospective observational study
    Ken Junyang Goh, Hui Zhong Chai, Lit Soo Ng, Joanna Phone Ko, Deshawn Chong Xuan Tan, Hui Li Tan, Constance Wei-Shan Teo, Ghee Chee Phua, Qiao Li Tan
    Annals of the Academy of Medicine, Singapore.2021; 50(11): 838.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Rapid Response Team on In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Hematologic Malignancy
    So-Jung Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Youn-Suck Koh, Jin-Won Huh
    Quality Improvement in Health Care.2021; 27(2): 18.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Global and Regional Ventilation during High Flow Nasal Cannula in Patients with Hypoxia
Dong Hyun Lee, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Hee Jung Suh, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(1):7-15.   Published online January 22, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00507
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2021;36(2):173
  • 8,209 View
  • 250 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is known to increase global ventilation volume in healthy subjects. We sought to investigate the effect of HFNC on global and regional ventilation patterns in patients with hypoxia.
Methods
Patients were randomized to receive one of two oxygen therapies in sequence: nasal cannula (NC) followed by HFNC or HFNC followed by NC. Global and regional ventilation was assessed using electric impedance tomography.
Results
Twenty-four patients participated. Global tidal variation (TV) in the lung was higher during HFNC (NC, 2,241 ± 1,381 arbitrary units (AU); HFNC, 2,543 ± 1,534 AU; P < 0.001). Regional TVs for four iso-gravitational quadrants of the lung were also all higher during HFNC than NC. The coefficient of variation for the four quadrants of the lung was 0.90 ± 0.61 during NC and 0.77 ± 0.48 during HFNC (P = 0.035). Within the four gravitational layers of the lung, regional TVs were higher in the two middle layers during HFNC when compared to NC. Regional TV values in the most ventral and dorsal layers of the lung were not higher during HFNC compared with NC. The coefficient of variation for the four gravitational layers of the lung were 1.00 ± 0.57 during NC and 0.97 ± 0.42 during HFNC (P = 0.574).
Conclusions
In patients with hypoxia, ventilation of iso-gravitational regions of the lung during HFNC was higher and more homogenized compared with NC. However, ventilation of gravitational layers increased only in the middle layers. (Clinical trials registration number: NCT02943863).

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • High-flow nasal cannulae for respiratory support in adult intensive care patients
    Sharon R Lewis, Philip E Baker, Roses Parker, Andrew F Smith
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Failure of High-Flow Nasal Cannula Therapy in Pneumonia and Non-Pneumonia Sepsis Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study
    Eunhye Kim, Kyeongman Jeon, Dong Kyu Oh, Young-Jae Cho, Sang-Bum Hong, Yeon Joo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Gee Young Suh, Mi-Hyeon Park, Chae-Man Lim, Sunghoon Park
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(16): 3587.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannulae for respiratory support in adult intensive care patients
    Sharon R Lewis, Philip E Baker, Roses Parker, Andrew F Smith
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
Basic science and research
Changes in Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Level in Patients with Sepsis and Septic Shock
Sang Hoon Lee, Byung Hoon Park, Joo Han Song, Song Yee Kim, Kyung Soo Chung, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Sam Kim, Se Kyu Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(4):324-333.   Published online November 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00024
  • 7,301 View
  • 117 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Despite many ongoing, prospective studies on the topic, sepsis still remains one of the main causes of death in hospital. The hormone insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) has a similar molecular structure to that of insulin. IGF-1 exerts anabolic effects and plays important roles in both normal physiology and pathologic processes. Previous studies have observed low serum IGF-1 level in patients with critical illnesses. Here, we evaluated changes in IGF-1 level based on survival of septic patients.
Methods
We evaluated 140 patients with sepsis and septic shock (21 with sepsis and 119 with septic shock) admitted to the intensive care unit of a university-affiliated hospital in Korea. Serum IGF-1 level was measured on days 0, 1, 3, and 7. Patients with liver disease were excluded from this study. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA).
Results
Patients with septic shock had significantly lower serum IGF-1 level on days 1 and 3 than patients without septic shock (p = 0.002 and p = 0.007, respectively). Generally, there was a negative relationship between IGF-1 and serum cortisol levels; however, this relationship was only significant on day 3 (p = 0.029). Furthermore, renin showed significantly negative correlation with IGF-1 on day 3 (p = 0.038). IGF-1 level did not show significant difference between survivors and non-survivors.
Conclusions
Our results showed that IGF-1 was associated with septic shock, and that the IGF-1 axis is severely disrupted in septic patients. Additionally, serum cortisol and renin levels were associated with IGF-1 level.
Neurology
Predisposing Hemodynamic Factors Associated with a Failed Apnea Test during Brain Death Determination
Eun Young Kim, Ji Hyun Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(3):236-242.   Published online August 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00332
  • 6,699 View
  • 123 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The apnea test is an essential component in the clinical determination of brain death, however it may incur a significant risk of complications such as hypotension, hypoxia and even cardiac arrest. We analyzed the risk factors associated with a failed apnea test during brain death assessment in order to predict and avoid these adverse events.
Methods
Medical records on apnea tests performed for brain-dead donors at our institution between January 2009 and January 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. Age, gender, etiology of brain death, use of catecholamines and results of arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure prior to apnea test initiation were collected as variables. A-a gradient and PaO2/FiO2 were calculated for more precise assessment of the respiratory system. In total, 267 cases were divided into two groups based on those who completed the apnea test and those who failed the test.
Results
13 cases failed the apnea test. Among them, seven cases failed due to severe hypotension (SBP < 60 mmHg) and the others failed due to refractory hypoxia. In terms of hemodynamic state, SBP was significantly higher in the completed test group than the failed group (126.5 ± 23.9 vs. 103 ± 15.2, respectively; p = 0.001). In ABGA, the completed test group showed significantly higher PaO2/ FiO2 (313.6 ± 229.8 vs. 141.5 ± 131.0, respectively; p = 0.008) and a lower A-a gradient (278.2 ± 209.5 vs. 506.2 ± 173.1, respectively; p = 0.000). In multivariable analysis, low SBP (p = 0.003) and high A-a gradient (p = 0.044) were independent risk factors associated with a failed apnea test.
Conclusions
Although the unexpected adverse events during the apnea test for brain death determination do not occur frequently, they can be fatal. If a brain-dead patient has low SBP and a high A-a gradient, clinicians should pay more attention and prepare for potential complications prior to the apnea test.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identification of Hemodynamic Risk Factors for Apnea Test Failure During Brain Death Determination
    Jin Joo Kim, Eun Young Kim
    Transplantation Proceedings.2019; 51(6): 1655.     CrossRef
  • Reduction of Apnea Test Time in an Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation-Dependent Potential Donor
    Hyeon Sook Jee, Sora Cha, Gaab Soo Kim
    Korean Journal of Transplantation.2017; 31(1): 49.     CrossRef
Case Reports
Genetic
Lethal Hyperammonemia due to Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency in a Patient with Severe Septic Shock
Ji An Hwang, Joo Han Song, Young Seok Lee, Kyung Soo Chung, Song Yee Kim, Eun Young Kim, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Young Sam Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(2):140-145.   Published online May 31, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.31.2.140
  • 7,342 View
  • 83 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Severe hyperammonemia can occur as a result of inherited or acquired liver enzyme defects in the urea cycle, among which ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) is the most common form. We report a very rare case of a 45-year-old Korean male who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to severe septic shock with acute respiratory failure caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. During his ICU stay with ventilator care, the patient suffered from marked hyperammonemia (>1,700 μg/dL) with abrupt mental change leading to life-threatening cerebral edema. Despite every effort including continuous renal replacement therapy and use of a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (extracorporeal liver support–albumin dialysis) to lower his serum ammonia level, the patient was not recovered. The lethal hyperammonemia in the patient was later proven to be a manifestation of acquired liver enzyme defect known as OTCD, which is triggered by serious catabolic conditions, such as severe septic shock with acute respiratory failure.
A Case of Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Severe Hypoxic Respiratory Failure: A Case Report
Joon Seok Choi, Hong Joon Shin, Eun Young Kim, In Jae Oh, Kyu Sik Kim, Yu Il Kim, Sung Chul Lim, Young Chul Kim, Yoo Duk Choi, Hyun Ju Seon, Yong Soo Kwon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2010;25(1):43-47.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2010.25.1.43
  • 2,482 View
  • 31 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
We describe here the first known case in Korea of pulmonary involvement with peripheral T cell lymphoma and the patient presented with severe hypoxic respiratory failure. A 57-yr-old man was admitted to our hospital with rapid progression of dyspnea and bilateral diffuse infiltration on a chest radiograph. He received mechanical ventilation and low dose corticosteroid treatment under the suspicion of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed large atypical lymphoid cells with positivity for CD3+. We diagnosed this patient as having a peripheral T cell lymphoma and we treated him with high dose corticosteroid. His clinical and radiologic findings rapidly improved and then he received a full dose of chemotherapy for the peripheral T cell lymphoma.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care