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Guideline
Pulmonary
Liberation from mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients: Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Practice Guidelines
Tae Sun Ha, Dong Kyu Oh, Hak-Jae Lee, Youjin Chang, In Seok Jeong, Yun Su Sim, Suk-Kyung Hong, Sunghoon Park, Gee Young Suh, So Young Park
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):1-23.   Published online February 28, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2024.00052
  • 3,931 View
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Successful liberation from mechanical ventilation is one of the most crucial processes in critical care because it is the first step by which a respiratory failure patient begins to transition out of the intensive care unit and return to their own life. Therefore, when devising appropriate strategies for removing mechanical ventilation, it is essential to consider not only the individual experiences of healthcare professionals, but also scientific and systematic approaches. Recently, numerous studies have investigated methods and tools for identifying when mechanically ventilated patients are ready to breathe on their own. The Korean Society of Critical Care Medicine therefore provides these recommendations to clinicians about liberation from the ventilator. Methods: Meta-analyses and comprehensive syntheses were used to thoroughly review, compile, and summarize the complete body of relevant evidence. All studies were meticulously assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) method, and the outcomes were presented succinctly as evidence profiles. Those evidence syntheses were discussed by a multidisciplinary committee of experts in mechanical ventilation, who then developed and approved recommendations. Results: Recommendations for nine PICO (population, intervention, comparator, and outcome) questions about ventilator liberation are presented in this document. This guideline includes seven conditional recommendations, one expert consensus recommendation, and one conditional deferred recommendation. Conclusions: We developed these clinical guidelines for mechanical ventilation liberation to provide meaningful recommendations. These guidelines reflect the best treatment for patients seeking liberation from mechanical ventilation.
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Association between mechanical power and intensive care unit mortality in Korean patients under pressure-controlled ventilation
Jae Kyeom Sim, Sang-Min Lee, Hyung Koo Kang, Kyung Chan Kim, Young Sam Kim, Yun Seong Kim, Won-Yeon Lee, Sunghoon Park, So Young Park, Ju-Hee Park, Yun Su Sim, Kwangha Lee, Yeon Joo Lee, Jin Hwa Lee, Heung Bum Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Ji Young Hong, Won Jun Song, Gee Young Suh
Acute Crit Care. 2024;39(1):91-99.   Published online January 26, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2023.00871
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mechanical power (MP) has been reported to be associated with clinical outcomes. Because the original MP equation is derived from paralyzed patients under volume-controlled ventilation, its application in practice could be limited in patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV). Recently, a simplified equation for patients under PCV was developed. We investigated the association between MP and intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of Korean data from the Fourth International Study of Mechanical Ventilation. We extracted data of patients under PCV on day 1 and calculated MP using the following simplified equation: MPPCV = 0.098 ∙ respiratory rate ∙ tidal volume ∙ (ΔPinsp + positive end-expiratory pressure), where ΔPinsp is the change in airway pressure during inspiration. Patients were divided into survivors and non-survivors and then compared. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine association between MPPCV and ICU mortality. The interaction of MPPCV and use of neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) was also analyzed. Results: A total of 125 patients was eligible for final analysis, of whom 38 died in the ICU. MPPCV was higher in non-survivors (17.6 vs. 26.3 J/min, P<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, only MPPCV was significantly associated with ICU mortality (odds ratio, 1.090; 95% confidence interval, 1.029–1.155; P=0.003). There was no significant effect of the interaction between MPPCV and use of NMBA on ICU mortality (P=0.579). Conclusions: MPPCV is associated with ICU mortality in patients mechanically ventilated with PCV mode, regardless of NMBA use.
Pulmonary
Association of pulmonary arterial pressure with volume status in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
Tae Hwa Hong, Hyoung Soo Kim, Sunghoon Park
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(2):159-167.   Published online March 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00927
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Data on pulmonary hemodynamic parameters in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are scarce.
Methods
The associations between pulmonary artery catheter parameters for the first 7 days of ECMO, fluid balance, and hospital mortality were investigated in adult patients (aged ≥19 years) who received venovenous ECMO for refractory ARDS between 2015 and 2017.
Results
Twenty patients were finally included in the analysis (median age, 56.0 years; interquartile range, 45.5–68.0 years; female, n=10). A total of 140 values were collected for each parameter (i.e., 7 days×20 patients). Net fluid balance was weakly but significantly correlated with systolic and diastolic pulmonary arterial pressures (PAPs; r=0.233 and P=0.011; r=0.376 and P<0.001, respectively). Among the mechanical ventilation parameters, above positive end-expiratory pressure was correlated with systolic PAP (r=0.191 and P=0.025), and static compliance was negatively correlated with diastolic PAP (r=−0.169 and P=0.048). Non-survivors had significantly higher systolic PAPs than in survivors. However, in multivariate analysis, there was no significant association between mean systolic PAP and hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.500; 95% confidence interval, 0.937–2.404; P=0.091).
Conclusions
Systolic PAP was weakly but significantly correlated with net fluid balance during the early ECMO period in patients with refractory ARDS receiving ECMO.
Erratum
Pulmonary
Erratum to “Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study”
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):172-172.   Published online May 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164.e1
Corrects: Acute Crit Care 2020;35(4):255
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  • 60 Download
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Original Article
Pulmonary
Utilization of pain and sedation therapy on noninvasive mechanical ventilation in Korean intensive care units: a multi-center prospective observational study
Taehee Kim, Jung Soo Kim, Eun Young Choi, Youjin Chang, Won-Il Choi, Jae-Joon Hwang, Jae Young Moon, Kwangha Lee, Sei Won Kim, Hyung Koo Kang, Yun Su Sim, Tai Sun Park, Seung Yong Park, Sunghoon Park, Jae Hwa Cho
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(4):255-262.   Published online November 9, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00164
Correction in: Acute Crit Care 2021;36(2):172
  • 6,290 View
  • 232 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The use of sedative drugs may be an important therapeutic intervention during noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in intensive care units (ICUs). The purpose of this study was to assess the current application of analgosedation in NIV and its impact on clinical outcomes in Korean ICUs.
Methods
Twenty Korean ICUs participated in the study, and data was collected on NIV use during the period between June 2017 and February 2018. Demographic data from all adult patients, NIV clinical parameters, and hospital mortality were included.
Results
A total of 155 patients treated with NIV in the ICUs were included, of whom 26 received pain and sedation therapy (sedation group) and 129 did not (control group). The primary cause of ICU admission was due to acute exacerbation of obstructed lung disease (45.7%) in the control group and pneumonia treatment (53.8%) in the sedation group. In addition, causes of NIV application included acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in the control group (62.8%) and post-extubation respiratory failure in the sedation group (57.7%). Arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) levels before and after 2 hours of NIV treatment were significantly decreased in both groups: from 61.9±23.8 mm Hg to 54.9±17.6 mm Hg in the control group (P<0.001) and from 54.9±15.1 mm Hg to 51.1±15.1 mm Hg in the sedation group (P=0.048). No significant differences were observed in the success rate of NIV weaning, complications, length of ICU stay, ICU survival rate, or hospital survival rate between the groups.
Conclusions
In NIV patients, analgosedation therapy may have no harmful effects on complications, NIV weaning success, and mortality compared to the control group. Therefore, sedation during NIV may not be unsafe and can be used in patients for pain control when indicated.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sedation and analgesia strategies for non-invasive mechanical ventilation: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Baolu Yang, Leyi Gao, Zhaohui Tong
    Heart & Lung.2024; 63: 42.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Music Therapy and Sound Isolation on the Comfort of Mechanically Ventilated Patients
    Sinem Çalışkan, Esra Akın, Mehmet Uyar
    Turkish Journal of Intensive Care.2024; 22(1): 83.     CrossRef
  • 2021 KSCCM clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, immobility, and sleep disturbance in the intensive care unit
    Yijun Seo, Hak-Jae Lee, Eun Jin Ha, Tae Sun Ha
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Comfort During Non-invasive Ventilation
    Gianmaria Cammarota, Rachele Simonte, Edoardo De Robertis
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: noninvasive mechanical ventilation
    Sunghoon Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 144.     CrossRef
  • Dexmedetomidine-Induced Aortic Contraction Involves Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Rats
    Soo Hee Lee, Seong-Chun Kwon, Seong-Ho Ok, Seung Hyun Ahn, Sung Il Bae, Ji-Yoon Kim, Yeran Hwang, Kyeong-Eon Park, Mingu Kim, Ju-Tae Sohn
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2022; 23(8): 4320.     CrossRef
Review Article
Pulmonary
Home mechanical ventilation: back to basics
Sunghoon Park, Eui-Sik Suh
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(3):131-141.   Published online August 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00514
  • 12,003 View
  • 529 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Over recent decades, the use of home mechanical ventilation (HMV) has steadily increased worldwide, with varying prevalence in different countries. The key indication for HMV is chronic respiratory failure with alveolar hypoventilation (e.g., neuromuscular and chest wall disease, obstructive airway diseases, and obesity-related respiratory failure). Most modern home ventilators are pressure-targeted and have sophisticated modes, alarms, and graphics, thereby facilitating optimization of the ventilator settings. However, different ventilators have different algorithms for tidal volume estimation and leak compensation, and there are also several different circuit configurations. Hence, a basic understanding of the fundamentals of HMV is of paramount importance to healthcare workers taking care of patients with HMV. When choosing a home ventilator, they should take into account many factors, including the current condition and prognosis of the primary disease, the patient’s daily performance status, time (hr/day) needed for ventilator support, family support, and financial costs. In this review, to help readers understand the basic concepts of HMV use, we describe the indications for HMV and the factors that influence successful delivery, including interface, circuits, ventilator accessories, and the ventilator itself.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • An investigation of the effect of the universal model of family-centered care on patient and family outcomes in patients under home invasive mechanical ventilation
    Babak Kavand, Parvaneh Asgari
    Family Practice.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Lucyna Płaszewska-Żywko, Izabela Fajfer-Gryz, Jakub Cichoń, Maria Kózka
    BMC Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    David Troxell
    Journal of Mechanical Ventilation.2024; 5(2): 69.     CrossRef
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    Hui Jin Shin, Ji-Hoon Na, Hyunjoo Lee, Young-Mock Lee
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2023; 64(12): 705.     CrossRef
  • Adaptation of Caregivers of Individuals on Mechanical Ventilation to Caregiving Role
    Tuba Yilmaz Bulut, İlknur Aydin Avci, Mesiya Aydin
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2023; 28(1): 41.     CrossRef
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    Anita Saigal, Amar J Shah, Swapna Mandal
    Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine.2023; 17(12): 1141.     CrossRef
  • Treatment of acute respiratory failure: noninvasive mechanical ventilation
    Sunghoon Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 144.     CrossRef
  • Mental health reported in adult invasive home mechanical ventilation through a tracheostomy: A scoping review
    Martin Locht Pedersen, Charlotte Handberg, Pia Dreyer
    International Journal of Nursing Studies Advances.2022; 4: 100110.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Pediatrics
Characteristics, management and clinical outcomes of patients with sepsis: a multicenter cohort study in Korea
Kyeongman Jeon, Soo Jin Na, Dong Kyu Oh, Sunghoon Park, Eun Young Choi, Seok Chan Kim, Gil Myeong Seong, Jeongwon Heo, Youjin Chang, Won Gun Kwack, Byung Ju Kang, Won-Il Choi, Kyung Chan Kim, So Young Park, Sang Hyun Kwak, Yoon Mi Shin, Heung Bum Lee, So Hee Park, Jae Hwa Cho, Beongki Kim, Chae‐Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(3):179-191.   Published online July 1, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00514
  • 8,615 View
  • 321 Download
  • 20 Web of Science
  • 23 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Mortality rates associated with sepsis have increased progressively in Korea, but domestic epidemiologic data remain limited. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics, management and clinical outcomes of sepsis patients in Korea.
Methods
This study is a multicenter retrospective cohort study. A total of 64,021 adult patients who visited an emergency department (ED) within one of the 19 participating hospitals during a 1-month period were screened for eligibility. Among these, patients diagnosed with sepsis based on the third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) were included in the study.
Results
Using the Sepsis-3 criteria, 977 sepsis patients were identified, among which 36.5% presented with septic shock. The respiratory system (61.8%) was the most common site of infection. The pathogen involved was identified in 444 patients (45.5%) and multi-drug resistance (MDR) pathogens were isolated in 171 patients. Empiric antibiotic therapy was appropriate in 68.6% of patients, but the appropriateness was significantly reduced in infections associated with MDR pathogens as compared with non-MDR pathogens (58.8% vs. 76.0%, P<0.001). Hospital mortality was 43.2% and 18.5% in sepsis patients with and without shock, respectively. Of the 703 patients who survived to discharge, 61.5% were discharged to home and 38.6% were transferred to other hospitals or facilities.
Conclusions
This study found the prevalence of sepsis in adult patients visiting an ED in Korea was 1.5% (15.2/1,000 patients). Patients with sepsis, especially septic shock, had a high mortality and were often referred to step-down centers after acute and critical care.

Citations

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  • Early Prediction of Mortality for Septic Patients Visiting Emergency Room Based on Explainable Machine Learning: A Real-World Multicenter Study
    Sang Won Park, Na Young Yeo, Seonguk Kang, Taejun Ha, Tae-Hoon Kim, DooHee Lee, Dowon Kim, Seheon Choi, Minkyu Kim, DongHoon Lee, DoHyeon Kim, Woo Jin Kim, Seung-Joon Lee, Yeon-Jeong Heo, Da Hye Moon, Seon-Sook Han, Yoon Kim, Hyun-Soo Choi, Dong Kyu Oh, S
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    Charlotte Berninghausen, Frank Schwab, Alexander Gropmann, Bernd A. Leidel, Rajan Somasundaram, Lydia Hottenbacher, Petra Gastmeier, Sonja Hansen
    Infection.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Joong-Yub Kim, Hong Yeul Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Dong Kyu Oh, Su Yeon Lee, Mi Hyeon Park, Chae-Man Lim, Sang-Min Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of an interpretable model for predicting sepsis mortality across care settings
    Young Seok Lee, Seungbong Han, Ye Eun Lee, Jaehwa Cho, Young Kyun Choi, Sun-Young Yoon, Dong Kyu Oh, Su Yeon Lee, Mi Hyeon Park, Chae-Man Lim, Jae Young Moon, Sang‑Bum Hong, Suk‑Kyung Hong, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung‑Eun Ko, Young‑Jae Cho, Yeon
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Rehab Salah Taha, Mohamed Elsayed Afandy, Abdelaziz Hamid Elbadawi, Mohamed Samir Abd El Ghafar
    Egyptian Journal of Anaesthesia.2023; 39(1): 56.     CrossRef
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    Hyung-Jun Kim, Dong Kyu Oh, Sung Yoon Lim, Young-Jae Cho, Sunghoon Park, Gee Young Suh, Chae-Man Lim, Yeon Joo Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Ji Hwan Kim, Yong Kyun Kim, Dong Kyu Oh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Gee Young Suh, Sung Yun Lim, Yeon Joo Lee, Young-Jae Cho, Mi-Hyeon Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Sunghoon Park
    Shock.2023; 59(3): 360.     CrossRef
  • Mortality among adult patients with sepsis and septic shock in Korea: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Myeong Namgung, Chiwon Ahn, Yeonkyung Park, Il-Youp Kwak, Jungguk Lee, Moonho Won
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2023; 10(2): 157.     CrossRef
  • Effects of prior antiplatelet and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use on mortality in patients undergoing abdominal surgery for abdominal sepsis
    Se Hun Kim, Ki Hoon Kim
    Surgery.2023; 174(3): 611.     CrossRef
  • Clinical effects of bacteremia in sepsis patients with community-acquired pneumonia
    Tae Wan Kim, Se-Uk Lee, Boram Park, Kyeongman Jeon, Sunghoon Park, Gee Young Suh, Dong Kyu Oh, Soo Yeon Lee, Mi Hyeon Park, Haein Lee, Chae-man Lim, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Sang-Bum Hong, Suk-Kyung Hong, Yeon Joo Lee, Young-Jae Cho, Sung Yoon Lim, Jeongwon Heo, Ja
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Neutropenic Sepsis: A Multicenter Cohort Study
    Soo Jin Na, Dong Kyu Oh, Sunghoon Park, Yeon Joo Lee, Sang-Bum Hong, Mi-Hyun Park, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Chae-Man Lim, Kyeongman Jeon
    Shock.2022; 57(5): 659.     CrossRef
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    Dong-gon Hyun, Su Yeon Lee, Jee Hwan Ahn, Jin Won Huh, Sang-Bum Hong, Younsuck Koh, Chae-Man Lim, Dong Kyu Oh, Gee Young Suh, Kyeongman Jeon, Ryoung-Eun Ko, Young-Jae Cho, Yeon Joo Lee, Sung Yoon Lim, Sunghoon Park, Jeongwon Heo, Jae-myeong Lee, Kyung Cha
    Critical Care.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    L. I. Gomanova, A. Y. Brazhnikov
    Epidemiology and Vaccinal Prevention.2021; 20(3): 107.     CrossRef
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    Ryoung-Eun Ko, Kyung Hoon Min, Sang-Bum Hong, Ae-Rin Baek, Hyun-Kyung Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Changhwan Kim, Youjin Chang, Sung-Soon Lee, Jee Youn Oh, Heung Bum Lee, Soohyun Bae, Jae Young Moon, Kwang Ha Yoo, Kyeongman Jeon
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    Diagnostics.2021; 11(12): 2344.     CrossRef
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    Mary Anne Vandegrift, Robert Granata, Vicken Y. Totten, John Kellett, Frank Sebat
    Critical Care Explorations.2021; 3(8): e0448.     CrossRef
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    Mi-Hee Kim, Jung-Hyun Choi
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2020; 52(1): 1.     CrossRef
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    Sunghoon Park, Kyeongman Jeon, Dong Kyu Oh, Eun Young Choi, Gil Myeong Seong, Jeongwon Heo, Youjin Chang, Won Gun Kwack, Byung Ju Kang, Won-Il Choi, Kyung Chan Kim, So Young Park, Yoon Mi Shin, Heung Bum Lee, So Hee Park, Seok Chan Kim, Sang Hyun Kwak, Ja
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    Youngjoon Kang
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(3): 221.     CrossRef
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    Hyeri Seok, Dae Won Park
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2019; 62(12): 638.     CrossRef
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    Yunghee Lee, Young-Jae Cho
    The Korean Journal of Medicine.2019; 94(6): 495.     CrossRef
Hematology
Characteristics and Clinical Outcomes of Critically Ill Cancer Patients Admitted to Korean Intensive Care Units
Soo Jin Na, Tae Sun Ha, Younsuck Koh, Gee Young Suh, Shin Ok Koh, Chae-Man Lim, Won-Il Choi, Young-Joo Lee, Seok Chan Kim, Gyu Rak Chon, Je Hyeong Kim, Jae Yeol Kim, Jaemin Lim, Sunghoon Park, Ho Cheol Kim, Jin Hwa Lee, Ji Hyun Lee, Jisook Park, Juhee Cho, Kyeongman Jeon
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):121-129.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00143
  • 8,175 View
  • 272 Download
  • 7 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcomes of critically ill cancer patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) in Korea.
Methods
This was a retrospective cohort study that analyzed prospective collected data from the Validation of Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS3) in Korean ICU (VSKI) study, which is a nationwide, multicenter, and prospective study that considered 5,063 patients from 22 ICUs in Korea over a period of 7 months. Among them, patients older than 18 years of age who were diagnosed with solid or hematologic malignancies prior to admission to the ICU were included in the present study.
Results
During the study period, a total of 1,762 cancer patients were admitted to the ICUs and 833 of them were deemed eligible for analysis. Six hundred fifty-eight (79%) had solid tumors and 175 (21%) had hematologic malignancies, respectively. Respiratory problems (30.1%) was the most common reason leading to ICU admission. Patients with hematologic malignancies had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (12 vs. 8, P<0.001) and SAPS3 (71 vs. 69, P<0.001) values and were more likely to be associated with chemotherapy, steroid therapy, and immunocompromised status versus patients with solid tumors. The use of inotropes/ vasopressors, mechanical ventilation, and/or continuous renal replacement therapy was more frequently required in hematologic malignancy patients. Mortality rates in the ICU (41.7% vs. 24.6%, P<0.001) and hospital (53.1% vs. 38.6%, P=0.002) were higher in hematologic malignancy patients than in solid tumor patients.
Conclusions
Cancer patients accounted for one-third of all patients admitted to the studied ICUs in Korea. Clinical characteristics were different according to the type of malignancy. Patients with hematologic malignancies had a worse prognosis than did patients with solid tumor.

Citations

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    Ching-Chi Lee, Jen-Chieh Lee, Chun-Wei Chiu, Pei-Jane Tsai, Wen-Chien Ko, Yuan-Pin Hung
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2022; Volume 15: 5387.     CrossRef
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    Da Woon Kim, Geum Suk Jang, Kyoung Suk Jung, Hyuk Jae Jung, Hyo Jin Kim, Harin Rhee, Eun Young Seong, Sang Heon Song
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    Lama H. Nazer, Maria A. Lopez-Olivo, Anne Rain Brown, John A. Cuenca, Michael Sirimaturos, Khader Habash, Nada AlQadheeb, Heather May, Victoria Milano, Amy Taylor, Joseph L. Nates
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  • Clinico-demographic and Outcome Predictors in Solid Tumor Patients with Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Admissions: An Observational Study
    Jigeeshu Divatia, Amit M Narkhede, Harish K Chaudhari, Ujwal Dhundi, Natesh Prabu Ravisankar, Satish Sarode
    Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2021; 25(12): 1421.     CrossRef
Review
Cardiology
Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Hyoung Soo Kim, Sunghoon Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(1):22-28.   Published online February 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00983
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  • 19 Web of Science
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs)/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

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  • Oxygenation During Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Physiology, Current Evidence, and a Pragmatic Approach to Oxygen Titration
    Lavienraj Premraj, Alastair Brown, John F. Fraser, Vincent Pellegrino, David Pilcher, Aidan Burrell
    Critical Care Medicine.2024; 52(4): 637.     CrossRef
  • A Comprehensive Review of Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation: The Lifeline in Critical Moments
    Sindhu Geetha, Neeta Verma, Vivek Chakole
    Cureus.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Point of care guided coagulation management in adult patients on ECMO: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Ayten Saracoglu, Ibrahim Fawzy, Kemal Tolga Saracoglu, Bushra M Abdallah, Mariah Arif, Matthieu Schmidt
    Journal of Critical Care.2024; 83: 154830.     CrossRef
  • Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation without allogeneic blood transfusion: An observational cohort study
    Alison Grazioli, Michael Plazak, Siamak Dahi, Joseph Rabin, Ashley Menne, Mehrdad Ghoreishi, Bradley Taylor, Seth Perelman, Michael Mazzeffi
    Perfusion.2023; 38(7): 1519.     CrossRef
  • A value-based approach to optimize red blood cell transfusion in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Yasuhiro Shudo, Nathalie Cheng, Hao He, Corinne Rosenberg, William Hiesinger, Eric Hadhazy, John Shepard, Purnima Krishna, Josh Resnik, Robyn Fong, Charles Hill, Joe L Hsu, Paul M Maggio, Sang-Ick Chang, Jack H Boyd, Y Joseph Woo
    Perfusion.2023; 38(8): 1682.     CrossRef
  • ECMO Retrieval Program: What Have We Learned So Far
    Ihor Krasivskyi, Clara Großmann, Marit Dechow, Ilija Djordjevic, Borko Ivanov, Stephen Gerfer, Walid Bennour, Elmar Kuhn, Anton Sabashnikov, Navid Mader, Kaveh Eghbalzadeh, Thorsten Wahlers
    Life.2023; 13(1): 157.     CrossRef
  • Haematological Trends and Transfusion during Adult Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Single Centre Study
    Elliott T. Worku, April M. Win, Dinesh Parmar, Chris Anstey, Kiran Shekar
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2023; 12(7): 2629.     CrossRef
  • Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Patient Outcomes Following Restrictive Blood Transfusion Protocol
    Jacob A. Braaten, Bridget S. Dillon, Jillian K. Wothe, Conner P. Olson, Elizabeth R. Lusczek, Kristiana J. Sather, Gregory J. Beilman, Melissa E. Brunsvold
    Critical Care Explorations.2023; 5(12): e1020.     CrossRef
  • Neonatal extra corporeal membrane oxygenation
    Suneel Kumar Pooboni
    Indian Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.2021; 37(4): 411.     CrossRef
  • Point-of-care testing of plasma free hemoglobin and hematocrit for mechanical circulatory support
    Dong Ah Shin, Jung Chan Lee, Heean Shin, Young-Jae Cho, Hee Chan Kim
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of the clinical effectiveness of point-of-care testing for anticoagulation management during ECMO
    Federica Jiritano, Dario Fina, Roberto Lorusso, Hugo ten Cate, Mariusz Kowalewski, Matteo Matteucci, Raffaele Serra, Pasquale Mastroroberto, Giuseppe Filiberto Serraino
    Journal of Clinical Anesthesia.2021; 73: 110330.     CrossRef
  • Blood transfusion strategies and ECMO during the COVID-19 pandemic
    David Koeckerling, Daniel Pan, N Lakmal Mudalige, Oluwatobiloba Oyefeso, Joseph Barker
    The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.2020; 8(5): e40.     CrossRef
  • Life-threatening antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–associated vasculitis after influenza A H1N1 infection requiring veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Frantzeska G. Frantzeskaki, Stavros Dimopoulos, Dimitrios Konstantonis, Pelagia Katsibri, Kostantinos Kostopanagiotou, Maria Theodorakopoulou, Chrysi Diakaki, Dimitrios Dougenis, Dimitrios Boumpas, Andreas Karabinis, Apostolos Armaganidis, Iraklis Tsangar
    Perfusion.2020; 35(6): 546.     CrossRef
  • Case Report: Successful Use of Extracorporeal Therapies After ECMO Resuscitation in a Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipient
    Andrey Rybalko, Anna Pytal, Mikhail Kaabak, Nadejda Rappoport, Anuar Bidzhiev, Vasilii Lastovka
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Article
Infection
Extended-Spectrum beta-Lactamase and Multidrug Resistance in Urinary Sepsis Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit
Bumjoon Kim, Sung Gyun Kim, Seung Soon Lee, Tae Seok Kim, Yong Il Hwang, Seung Hun Jang, Joo Hee Kim, Ki Suck Jung, Sunghoon Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):257-265.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.257
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The role of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing or multidrug-resistant (MDR) organisms in patients with sepsis secondary to urinary traction infection (UTI) has not been investigated extensively in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting.
METHODS
Patients with UTI sepsis admitted to the ICU were retrospectively enrolled in this study (January 2009-December 2012). We investigated the impact of ESBL-producing and ESBL-negative MDR organisms on hospital outcome.
RESULTS
In total, 94 patients were enrolled (median age, 73.0 years; female, 81.9%), and ESBL-producing and ESBL-negative MDR organisms accounted for 20.2% (n = 19) and 30.9% (n = 29), respectively. Both patients with ESBL-producing and ESBL-negative MDR organisms were more likely to experience a delay in adequate antibiotic therapy than those with non-ESBL/non-MDR organisms (p < 0.001 and p = 0.032, respectively). However, only patients with ESBL-producing organisms showed a higher mortality rate (ESBL vs. ESBL-negative MDR vs. non-ESBL/non-MDR, 31.6% vs. 10.3%.vs. 10.9%, respectively). In multivariate analyses, ESBL production was significantly associated with hospital mortality (odds ratio, 11.547; 95micro confidence interval, 1.047-127.373), and prior admission was a significant predictor of ESBL production.
CONCLUSIONS
Although both ESBL-producing and ESBL-negative MDR organisms are associated with delayed administration of appropriate antibiotics, only ESBL production is a significant predictor of hospital mortality among patients with UTI sepsis in the ICU setting.

Citations

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  • Worrisome high frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in community-acquired urinary tract infections: a case–control study
    Franco Castillo-Tokumori, Claudia Irey-Salgado, Germán Málaga
    International Journal of Infectious Diseases.2017; 55: 16.     CrossRef
Review
Intensivist Physician Staffing in Intensive Care Units
Sunghoon Park, Gee Young Suh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2013;28(1):1-9.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2013.28.1.1
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  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite a shortage of intensivists, there is an increased need for intensivist staffing in intensive care units (ICUs). Western studies showed that the survival rate of critically ill patients improved and the length of ICU stay decreased in "closed" or "high-intensity" ICU, where intensivists dedicated themselves to the ICU and were primary physicians. This system was also associated with an increased compliance of evidence-based medicine and a decreased medical error. The Leapfrog Group and American College of Critical Care Medicine recommend the implementation of intensivist staffing system in the ICU. Although there are still barriers to implement this system, such as the economic burden to hospitals and conflicts among medical staff, intensivist staffing in the ICU is important in terms of timely diagnosis and treatment and multidisciplinary team approach. The presence of intensivists may also increase the efficacy of ICU systems and save treatment cost. Although the "24 hours/7 days intensivist staffing" system may be ideal, recent data showed that high-intensity ICU system during daytime is not inferior to 24-hour intensivist staffing system in terms of hospital mortality. It is especially important to large-scale academic hospitals, where many severely ill patients are treated. However, few ICUs have intensivists who are committed to caring for ICU patients in Korea. Therefore, we have to try to expand this system throughout the whole country. Additionally, the definition of ICU standard, the role of intensivists, and the policy of financial reward also need to be clarified more clearly.

Citations

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  • Effects of the presence of a pediatric intensivist on treatment in the pediatric intensive care unit
    Jung Eun Kwon, Da Eun Roh, Yeo Hyang Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2020; 35(2): 87.     CrossRef
  • Intensivist as a Surgeon: The Role of a Surgeon in Critical Care Medicine
    Kyung Sook Hong
    The Ewha Medical Journal.2017; 40(2): 61.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Effect of the Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitor on Acute Lung Injury after Pulmonary Resection for Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Study
So Young Park, Sunghoon Park, Kyeongman Jeon, So Yeon Lim, Maeng Real Park, Sueah Kim, Jae Uk Song, Jhin Gook Kim, O Jung Kwon, Gee Young Suh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2009;24(3):124-128.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2009.24.3.124
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are the leading causes of death after lungresection. Neutrophil elastase is thought to be an important mediator in the pathogenesis of ALI. Sivelestat is a new neutrophil elastase inhibitor which may improve the outcome in patients with ALI/ARDS after lung resection. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not sivelestat can reduce mortality in patients with ALI after pulmonary resection for lung cancer.
METHODS
This study was a retrospective case-control study of twenty three patients who developed ALI/ARDS within seven days of lung resection for lung cancer. The control group (n = 12) received standard care, while the sivelestat group (n = 11) received a continuous infusion of sivelestat (0.2 mg/kg/hr) for seven days in addition to standard care.
RESULTS
There was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics between the control and sivelestat groups, except for heart rate. Six of twelve patients (50%) in the control group survived, while seven of twelve patients (64%) survived in the sivelestat group (p = 0.34). There was also no significant difference between the two groups in the progression to ARDS. In the sivelelestat group, survivors had lower APACHE II and SOFA scores than the patients in the control group.
CONCLUSIONS
There was no additional effect of a neutrophil elastase inhibitor in the treatment of ALI after pulmonary resection for lung cancer.
The Prognostic Utility of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) Score for Hemato-Oncology Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit
Sunghoon Park, Won Jung Koh, Man Pyo Chung, Hojoong Kim, O Jung Kwon, Won Ki Kang, Chul Won Jung, Jin Seok Ahn, Gee Young Suh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2009;24(1):4-10.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2009.24.1.4
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The prognosis of hemato-oncology (HMO) patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is poor and predicting the mortality is important for decision making at the time of ICU admission and for administering aggressive treatment.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed 309 patients who were admitted to the medical ICU (MICU) at Samsung Medical Center from July in 2005 to June in 2006. We calculated their Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the time of ICU admission and we investigated the relationship between the two scoring systems and the hospital mortality.
RESULTS
Among the 309 patients, the hospital mortality was 41.2%, and the mean SAPS II/SOFA score at ICU admission was 45.4 +/- 19.5/8.1 +/- 4.6. Seventy-nine (25.6%) patients had hemato-oncological diseases. Their hospital mortality was 65.8%, and the mean SAPS II/SOFA score at the time of ICU admission was 53.9 +/- 18.6/9.7 +/- 4.4, which was higher than that of the non-HMO patients (p = 0.00). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for the SAPS II/SOFA score for predicting the mortality was 0.794 +/- 0.05/0.785 +/- 0.051 (p = 0.00/p = 0.00) for the HMO patients. There was no significant difference in discrimination ability between the two scoring systems (p > 0.05). None of the HMO patients with a SAPS II/SOFA score of 70/14 or higher survived.
CONCLUSIONS
Both the SAPS II and SOFA scores at the time of ICU admission were similarly effective for predicting the hospital mortality. The two scoring systems could be useful tools for decision making at the time of ICU admission and for administering aggressive treatment.

Citations

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  • Association of Peripheral Lymphocyte Subset with the Severity and Prognosis of Septic Shock
    Jin Kyeong Park, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Jin Won Huh
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2011; 26(1): 13.     CrossRef
Diagnosis of Acid-base Imbalance by Stewart's Physicochemical Approach and Mortality Prediction in Severe Burn Patients with Inhalation Injury
Sunghoon Park, Cheol Hong Kim, In Gyu Hyun, Ki Suck Jung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2006;21(1):17-27.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Acid-base derangement are commonly encountered in critically ill patients. This study is to investigate underlying mechanisms of acid-base imbalance and also to examine whether they can predict mortality in burn patients.
METHODS
We retrospectively reviewed 73 severely burned patients who had admitted to burn intensive care unit, from January to July in 2004. All the patients had inhalation injury, identified by bronchoscopic examination. We analyzed the type and nature of the acid-base imbalances from arterial blood gas analysis, electrolytes and other biological tests between survivors and non-survivors for 30 days after admission.
RESULTS
Acidosis was the most common disorder during the early and late hospital periods. Large fractions of those showed decreased strong ion difference (SID), increased anion gap corrected by albumin (AGc) and [Cl-]corrected. Mixed disorder and alkalosis emerged after the 7(th) hospital day. As time went by, albumin, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, pH and SID were more decreased in non-survivors (n=28) than in survivors (n=45) while [Cl-] corrected, alveolar-arterial oxygen tension gradients, peripheral WBC counts and CRP were more increased in non-survivors than in survivors. In the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for mortality prediction, APACHE II score and % of total body surface area (%TBSA) burn were high: 0.866 (95% CI; 0.785~0.946) for APACHE II score, 0.817 (95% CI; 0.717~0.918) for %TBSA burn.
CONCLUSIONS
In burned patients with inhalation injury, various types of acid-base imbalances and electrolytes abnormalities emerged after resuscitation and so, more careful attentions pursued for correcting underlying acid-base derangement.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care