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Original Article
Pulmonary
Effects of high-flow nasal cannula in patients with mild to moderate hypercapnia: a prospective observational study
Kyung Hun Nam, Hyung Koo Kang, Sung-Soon Lee, So-Hee Park, Sung Wook Kang, Jea Jun Hwang, So Young Park, Won Young Kim, Hee Jung Suh, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):249-255.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01102
  • 6,203 View
  • 249 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Evidence for using high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in hypercapnia is still limited. Most of the clinical studies had been conducted retrospectively, and there had been conflicting reports for the effects of HFNC on hypercapnia correction in prospective studies. Therefore, more evidence is needed to understand the effect of the HFNC in hypercapnia.
Methods
We conducted a multicenter prospective observational study after applying HFNC to 45 hospitalized subjects who had moderate hypercapnia (arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO2], 43–70 mm Hg) without severe respiratory acidosis (pH <7.30). The primary outcome was a change in PaCO2 level in the first 24 hours of HFNC use. The secondary outcomes were changes in other parameters of arterial blood gas analysis, changes in respiration rates, and clinical outcomes.
Results
There was a significant decrease in PaCO2 in the first hour of HFNC application (-3.80 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6.35 to -1.24; P<0.001). Reduction of PaCO2 was more prominent in subjects who did not have underlying obstructive lung disease. There was a correction in pH, but no significant changes in respiratory rate, bicarbonate, and arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio. Mechanical ventilation was not required for 93.3% (42/45) of our study population.
Conclusions
We suggest that HFNC could be a safe alternative for oxygen delivery in hypercapnia patients who do not need immediate mechanical ventilation. With HFNC oxygenation, correction of hypercapnia could be expected, especially in patients who do not have obstructive lung diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and efficacy of high flow nasal canula in patients with mild hypercapnia
    Mohammed A. Ibrahim, Magdy Emara, Mohammed Shehta
    The Egyptian Journal of Bronchology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannula: Evaluation of the perceptions of various performance aspects among Chinese clinical staff and establishment of a multidimensional clinical evaluation system
    Ruoxuan Wen, Xingshuo Hu, Tengchen Wei, Kaifei Wang, Zhimei Duan, Zhanqi Zhao, Lixin Xie, Fei Xie
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application Progress of HFNC in Respiratory Diseases
    迪 吴
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(11): 10617.     CrossRef
Review
Cardiology/Infection
How Do I Integrate Hemodynamic Variables When Managing Septic Shock?
Olfa Hamzaoui, Jean-Louis Teboul
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(4):265-275.   Published online November 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00927
  • 18,285 View
  • 1,170 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hemodynamic management of sepsis-induced circulatory failure is complex since this pathological state includes multiple cardiovascular derangements that can vary from patient to patient according to the degree of hypovolemia, of vascular tone depression, of myocardial depression and of microvascular dysfunction. The treatment of the sepsis-induced circulatory failure is thus not univocal and should be adapted on an individual basis. As physical examination is insufficient to obtain a comprehensive picture of the hemodynamic status, numerous hemodynamic variables more or less invasively collected, have been proposed to well assess the severity of each component of the circulatory failure and to monitor the response to therapy. In this article, we first describe the hemodynamic variables, which are the most relevant to be used, emphasizing on their physiological meaning, their validation and their limitations in patients with septic shock. We then proposed a general approach for managing patients with septic shock by describing the logical steps that need to be followed in order to select and deliver the most appropriate therapies. This therapeutic approach is essentially based on knowledge of physiology, of pathophysiology of sepsis, and of published data from clinical studies that addressed the issue of hemodynamic management of septic shock.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Enhancement in Performance of Septic Shock Prediction Using National Early Warning Score, Initial Triage Information, and Machine Learning Analysis
    Hyoungju Yun, Jeong Ho Park, Dong Hyun Choi, Sang Do Shin, Myoung-jin Jang, Hyoun-Joong Kong, Suk Wha Kim
    The Journal of Emergency Medicine.2021; 61(1): 1.     CrossRef
Original Article
Comparison of Ventilations with LMA and Endotracheal Tube during Closed Circuit Anesthesia
Il Woo Shin, Kyeong Eon Park, Hee Dong Chung, Ju Tae Sohn, Heon Keun Lee, Young Kyun Chung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2004;19(2):126-129.
  • 3,282 View
  • 38 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
LMA has larger dead-space than tracheal tube, ventilation may be influenced by difference of dead space. Closed circuit mechanical ventilation has high risk of hypercarbia because of inadequate CO2 elimination or gas supply. Thus, end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (EtCO2) and arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) were compared during closed circuit mechanical ventilation with LMA or tracheal tube. METHODS: Thirty adult patients scheduled for general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups. After induction of general anesthesia, laryngeal mask airway (Group 1, n=15) or tracheal tube (Group 2, n=15) were randomly inserted and closed circuit mechanical ventilation was initiated. When steady state had been reached, PaCO2 and EtCO2 were recorded. RESULTS: The PaCO2 was 32.2+/-2.8 (Group 1), 31.5+/-2.2 (Group 2) and the EtCO2 was 33.0+/-2.9, 31.6+/-2.4 respectively and there was no statistical significance between groups. The difference of arterial and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension in each group was -0.8+/-2.6, -0.03+/-2.2 respectively and there was no statistical significance between groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that in patients who are mechanically ventilated via the closed circuit system, EtCO2, PaCO2, and the difference between arterial and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were not significantly different between groups.
Case Report
Clinical Trial of Tracheal Gas Insufflation to Control Hypercapnia Occured during Laparoscopic Surgery: A Case Report
Seong Sik Kang
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2004;19(1):61-64.
  • 1,508 View
  • 17 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite numerous benefits of laparoscopic procedures, during carbon dioxide-induced pneumoperitoneum, the serious hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis in hypercapnic patients with decreased pulmonary compliance may be developed. Tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) has been shown to be a useful adjunct to controlled mechanical hypoventilation. However, the utility of TGI in hypercapnic management during laparoscopic surgery was not reported yet. We report a case that TGI superimposed on controlled mechanical ventilation corrected hypercapnia induced by carbon dioxide-induced pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic salphingo-oophorectomy. There was no specific anesthetic problem during operation, patients was discharged uneventfully.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care