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Ethics
Decision-making regarding withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and the role of intensivists in the intensive care unit: a single-center study
Seo In Lee, Kyung Sook Hong, Jin Park, Young-Joo Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(3):179-188.   Published online August 10, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.00136
  • 6,821 View
  • 210 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study examined the experience of withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in patients hospitalized in the intensive care units (ICUs) of a tertiary care center. It also considers the role that intensivists play in the decision-making process regarding the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment.
Methods
We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 227 patients who decided to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment while hospitalized at Ewha Womans University Medical Center Mokdong between April 9 and December 31, 2018.
Results
The 227 hospitalized patients included in the analysis withheld or withdrew from life-sustaining treatment. The department in which life-sustaining treatment was withheld or withdrawn most frequently was hemato-oncology (26.4%). Among these patients, the most common diagnosis was gastrointestinal tract cancer (29.1%). A majority of patients (64.3%) chose not to receive any life-sustaining treatment. Of the 80 patients in the ICU, intensivists participated in the decision to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment in 34 cases. There were higher proportions of treatment withdrawal and ICU-to-ward transfers among the cases in whom intensivists participated in decision making compared to those cases in whom intensivists did not participate (50.0% vs. 4.3% and 52.9% vs. 19.6%, respectively).
Conclusions
Through their participation in end-of-life discussions, intensivists can help patients’ families to make decisions about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment and possibly avoiding futile treatments for these patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients with do-not-resuscitate and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment in a medical intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study
    Song-I Lee, Ye-Rin Ju, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Comparison of factors influencing the decision to withdraw life-sustaining treatment in intensive care unit patients after implementation of the Life-Sustaining Treatment Act in Korea
    Claire Junga Kim, Kyung Sook Hong, Sooyoung Cho, Jin Park
    Acute and Critical Care.2024; 39(2): 294.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the end-of-life decisions of patients with hospital-acquired pneumonia after the enforcement of the life-sustaining treatment decision act in Korea
    Ae-Rin Baek, Sang-Bum Hong, Soohyun Bae, Hye Kyeong Park, Changhwan Kim, Hyun-Kyung Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Jin Hyoung Kim, Youjin Chang, Heung Bum Lee, Hyun-Il Gil, Beomsu Shin, Kwang Ha Yoo, Jae Young Moon, Jee Youn Oh, Kyung Hoon Min, Kyeongman Jeon, Moon S
    BMC Medical Ethics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dying in the ICU
    Isabel Schulmeyer, Markus A. Weigand, Monika Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Marco Gruss
    Die Anaesthesiologie.2022; 71(12): 930.     CrossRef
  • Changes in the incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation before and after implementation of the Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions Act
    Hyunjae Im, Hyun Woo Choe, Seung-Young Oh, Ho Geol Ryu, Hannah Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 237.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the Initiative Behavior of Intensive Care Unit Nurses toward End-of-Life Decision Making: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Jingying Huang, Haiou Qi, Yiting Zhu, Minyan Zhang
    Journal of Palliative Medicine.2022; 25(12): 1802.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of high-intensity care in intensive care units and its cost at the end of life among older people in South Korea between 2016 and 2019: a cross-sectional study of the health insurance review and assessment service national patient sample database
    Yunji Lee, Minjeong Jo, Taehwa Kim, Kyoungsun Yun
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(8): e049711.     CrossRef
Ethics
Effect of Timing of Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders on the Clinical Outcome of Critically Ill Patients
Moon Seong Baek, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Chae-Man Lim, Jin Won Huh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(3):229-235.   Published online August 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00178
  • 11,444 View
  • 152 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Many physicians hesitate to discuss do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders with patients or family members in critical situations. In the intensive care unit (ICU), delayed DNR decisions could cause unintentional cardiopulmonary resuscitation, patient distress, and substantial cost. We investigated whether the timing of DNR designation affects patient outcome in the medical ICU.
Methods
We enrolled retrospective patients with written DNR orders in a medical ICU (13 bed) from June 1, 2014 to May 31, 2015. The patients were divided into two groups: early DNR patients for whom DNR orders were implemented within 48 h of ICU admission, and late DNR patients for whom DNR orders were implemented more than 48 h after ICU admission.
Results
Herein, 354 patients were admitted to the medical ICU and among them, 80 (22.6%) patients had requested DNR orders. Of these patients, 37 (46.3%) had designated DNR orders within 48 hours of ICU admission and 43 (53.7%) patients had designated DNR orders more than 48 hours after ICU admission. Compared with early DNR patients, late DNR patients tended to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining management (18.9% vs. 37.2%, p = 0.072). DNR consent forms were signed by family members instead of the patients. Septic shock was the most common cause of medical ICU admission in both the early and late DNR patients (54.1% vs. 37.2%, p = 0.131). There was no difference in in-hospital mortality (83.8% vs. 81.4%, p = 0.779). Late DNR patients had longer ICU stays than early DNR patients (7.4 ± 8.1 vs. 19.7 ± 19.2, p < 0.001).
Conclusions
Clinical outcomes are not influenced by the time of DNR designation in the medical ICU. The late DNR group is associated with a longer length of ICU stay and a tendency of withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. However, further studies are needed to clarify the guideline for end-of-life care in critically ill patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Characteristics and outcomes of patients with do-not-resuscitate and physician orders for life-sustaining treatment in a medical intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study
    Song-I Lee, Ye-Rin Ju, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    BMC Palliative Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prognostic models of in-hospital mortality of intensive care patients using neural representation of unstructured text: A systematic review and critical appraisal
    I. Vagliano, N. Dormosh, M. Rios, T.T. Luik, T.M. Buonocore, P.W.G. Elbers, D.A. Dongelmans, M.C. Schut, A. Abu-Hanna
    Journal of Biomedical Informatics.2023; 146: 104504.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Do-Not-Resuscitate Order in the Emergency Department on Respiratory Failure after ICU Admission
    Ting-Yu Hsu, Pei-Ming Wang, Po-Chun Chuang, Yan-Ren Lin, Yuan-Jhen Syue, Tsung-Cheng Tsai, Chao-Jui Li
    Healthcare.2022; 10(3): 434.     CrossRef
  • Early DNR in Older Adults Hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 Infection During Initial Pandemic Surge
    Shalin Shah, Alex Makhnevich, Jessica Cohen, Meng Zhang, Allison Marziliano, Michael Qiu, Yan Liu, Michael A. Diefenbach, Maria Carney, Edith Burns, Liron Sinvani
    American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine®.2022; 39(12): 1491.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Signing Do-Not-Resuscitate Orders on the Use of Non-Beneficial Life-Sustaining Treatments for Intensive Care Unit Patients: A Retrospective Study
    Shang-Sin Shiu, Ting-Ting Lee, Ming-Chen Yeh, Yu-Chi Chen, Shu-He Huang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(15): 9521.     CrossRef
  • Early versus late DNR orders and its predictors in a Saudi Arabian ICU: A descriptive study
    WaleedTharwat Aletreby, AhmedF Mady, MohammedA Al-Odat, AhmedN Balshi, AnasA Mady, AdamM Al-Odat, AmiraM Elshayeb, AhmedF Mostafa, ShereenA Abd Elsalam, KrizL Odchigue
    Saudi Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences.2022; 10(3): 192.     CrossRef
  • Decision-making regarding withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and the role of intensivists in the intensive care unit: a single-center study
    Seo In Lee, Kyung Sook Hong, Jin Park, Young-Joo Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2020; 35(3): 179.     CrossRef
  • Determination of the characteristics and outcomes of the palliative care patients admitted to the emergency department
    Gulcan Bakan, Mert Ozen, Arife Azak, Bulent Erdur
    International Emergency Nursing.2020; 53: 100934.     CrossRef
  • Do‐Not‐Resuscitate Orders in Older Adults During Hospitalization: A Propensity Score–Matched Analysis
    Karishma Patel, Liron Sinvani, Vidhi Patel, Andrzej Kozikowski, Christopher Smilios, Meredith Akerman, Kinga Kiszko, Sutapa Maiti, Negin Hajizadeh, Gisele Wolf‐Klein, Renee Pekmezaris
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2018; 66(5): 924.     CrossRef
  • Changes in Life-sustaining Treatment in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients after Signing a Do-Not-Resuscitate Order
    Hyun A Kim, Jeong Yun Park
    The Korean Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care.2017; 20(2): 93.     CrossRef
  • The Authors Reply
    Jeong Uk Lim, Jongmin Lee, Jick Hwan Ha, Hyeon Hui Kang, Sang Haak Lee, Hwa Sik Moon
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(4): 377.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care