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Volume 29 (1); February 2014
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Editorial
Pulmonary
Will the Taper Shaped Cuff Replace the Conventional High Volume-Low Pressured Cuff on Endotracheal Tube?
Sung Jin Hong
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):1-2.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.1
  • 5,046 View
  • 104 Download
PDF
Original Articles
Pulmonary
The Effect of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Air Leakage: Comparison of Cuff Designs
Junyong In, Gyung Serk Shim, Seunghyun Chung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):3-6.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.3
  • 4,973 View
  • 161 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Recently developed taper-shaped cuffs (TG cuffs) of endotracheal tubes (ETTs) are known to have a more potent sealing effect than cylindrical high-volume low-pressure cuffs (HL cuffs) of conventional ETTs. The aim of this study was to compare TG cuffs with HL cuffs of ETTs in a bench-top model with regard to air leakage under various positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP).
Methods
HL cuffs and TG cuffs made from PVC were included (HL group vs. TG group). A model trachea with an internal diameter (ID) of 22 mm was attached to a test lung. The test lung was ventilated using an anesthesia respirator with volume controlled mode and PEEPs of 0, 5, 10, or 15 cm H2O. Using spirometry, percentages of expired to inspired tidal volumes (TVe/i) were calculated as a measure of air leakage.
Results
With regard to PEEPs, the HL group showed significantly higher air leakage compared to the TG group (p < 0.0001), and a higher PEEP resulted in greater air leakage (p < 0.0001). Air leakage with higher PEEP was greater in the HL group than in the TG group at ID 7.0 mm and 7.5 mm (p = 0.0467, p = 0.0045)
Conclusions
This study shows the superior sealing ability of the TG cuff during ventilation at various PEEPs.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of Low‐Volume, Low‐Pressure Tracheostomy Cuffs on Acute Mucosal Injury in Swine
    Alexandra J. Berges, Ioan A. Lina, Rafael Ospino, Hsiu‐Wen Tsai, Dacheng Ding, Jessica M. Izzi, Alexander T. Hillel
    Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.2022; 167(4): 716.     CrossRef
  • Tidal Volume Delivery and Endotracheal Tube Leak during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Intubated Newborn Piglets with Hypoxic Cardiac Arrest Exposed to Different Modes of Ventilatory Support
    Marc R. Mendler, Claudia Weber, Mohammad A. Hassan, Li Huang, Benjamin Mayer, Helmut D. Hummler
    Neonatology.2017; 111(2): 100.     CrossRef
Thoracic Surgery
A Closed-Suction Catheter with a Pressure Valve Can Reduce Tracheal Mucosal Injury in Intubated Patients
Jin Heon Jeong, Sung Jin Nam, Young Jae Cho, Yeon Joo Lee, Se Joong Kim, In Ae Song, Sang Heon Park, Young Tae Jeon
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):7-12.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.7
  • 7,493 View
  • 159 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Endotracheal suctioning is associated with complications that include bleeding, infection, hypoxemia, cardiovascular instability, and tracheal mucosal injury. Recently, a closed-suction catheter with a pressure valve (Acetrachcare, AceMedical Co., Republic of Korea) was developed. We hypothesized that this new catheter might reduce tracheal mucosal injury compared to a conventional closed-suction catheter (Trachcare, Kimberly-balla RD, USA).
Methods
This prospective, randomized study enrolled medical and surgical patients who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours. Patients were randomized into two groups: one group was suctioned with the conventional closed-suction catheter (CCC) and the other group was suctioned with the closed-suction catheter with pressure valve (CCPV). Bronchoscopy was performed 48 hours later, and the severity of tracheal mucosal injury was graded on a 5-point scale, as follows: 0 = normal; 1 = erythema or edema; 2 = erosion; 3 = hemorrhage; and 4 = ulceration or necrosis.
Results
A total of 76 patients (37 with CCPV and 39 with CCC) were included. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding demographic characteristics, changes in hemodynamic parameters during suction, incidence of pneumonia, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, or ICU mortality. On bronchoscopic evaluation, the use of the CCPV led to a significant decrease in tracheal mucosal injury (median tracheal mucosal injury grade 1 [IQR 0-1] vs. 2 [IQR 1-3], p = 0.001).
Conclusions
We conclude that the novel closed-suction catheter with pressure valve may reduce tracheal mucosal injury compared to conventional catheters.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • “Study on Device System to Reduce Tracheal Mucosal Injury in Intubation Patients” [ASME Journal of Medical Devices, 2022, 16(3), p. 031006; DOI: 10.1115/1.4054334]

    Journal of Medical Devices.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Efficacy of the Closed Suction Applied To Patients In Intensive Care Units with Different Techniques: A Nonrandomized Controlled Trial
    Zuhal GÜLSOY, Şerife KARAGÖZOĞLU
    Cumhuriyet Medical Journal.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Thoracic Surgery
Clinical Characteristics of the Development of Pneumothorax in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Units
Wan Chul Kim, Su Jin Lim, Kyong Young Kim, Seung Jun Lee, Yu Ji Cho, Yi Yeong Jeong, Mi Jung Park, Kyoung Nyeo Jeon, Jong Deog Lee, Young Sil Hwang, Ho Cheol Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):13-18.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.13
  • 4,417 View
  • 71 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pneumothorax (PTX) can occur as a complication of positive pressure ventilation in mechanically ventilated patients.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics of patients who developed PTX during mechanical ventilation (MV) in the intensive care unit (ICU).
Results
Of the 326 patients admitted (208 men and 118 women; mean age, 65.3 ± 8.74 years), 15 (4.7%) developed PTX, which was MV-associated in 11 (3.3%) cases (6 men and 5 women; mean age, 68.3 ± 9.12 years) and procedure-associated in 4. Among the patients with MV-associated PTX, the underlying lung diseases were acute respiratory distress syndrome in 7 patients, interstitial lung disease in 2 patients, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 2 patients. PTX diagnosis was achieved by chest radiography alone in 9 patients and chest computed tomography alone in 2 patients. Nine patients were using assist-control mode MV with the mean applied positive end-expiratory pressure, 9 ± 4.6 cmH2O and the mean tidal volume, 361 ± 63.7 ml at the diagnosis of PTX. Two patients died as a result of MV-associated PTX and their systolic pressure was below 80 mmHg and heart rates were less than 80/min. Ten patients were treated by chest tube insertion, and 1 patient was treated by percutaneous pigtail catheter insertion.
Conclusions
PTX can develop in patients undergoing MV, and may cause death. Early recognition and treatment are necessary to prevent hemodynamic compromise in patients who develop PTX.
Case Reports
Cardiology
Torsades de Pointes during Treatment of Tachycardia-Induced Cardiomyopathy
Dong Kyu Lee, Il Hwan Ryu, Ji Hyung Yoo, Su A Yun, Sang Hyun Park, Ki Woon Kang, Won Ho Kim, Yu Jeong Choi, Kyung Tae Jung, Jung Yeon Chin
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):19-22.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.19
  • 5,527 View
  • 71 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is caused by persistent tarchyarrhythmias and is characterized by ventricular systolic dysfunction and congestive heart failure. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is usually reversible via treatment. The cornerstone in the management of disease in these patients is to achieve a normal heart rate. We report a torsades de pointes during treatment of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. Intravenous magnesium sulfate and potassium were administrated, but torsades de pointes was repeated. After overdrive right ventricular pacing, torsades de pointes was terminated. Careful monitoring of the QT interval and serum electrolyte and drug levels in such patients is warranted during treatment of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.
Cardiology/Pediatric
Acute Myocardial Infarction during the Subacute Phase of Refractory and Incomplete Kawasaki Disease in a Five-year-old Boy
Chul Jin, Yeo Hyang Kim, Hyung Seop Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):23-26.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.23
  • 6,133 View
  • 80 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, systemic vasculitis of childhood. The early mortality of KD results from coronary complications, mainly aneurysmal thrombosis with myocardial infarction, and the subacute phase of KD has the highest risk of mortality. Although there have been reports of ischemic heart disease as late cardiologic sequelae of KD in young adults, acute myocardial infarction caused by coronary complications in the subacute phase of KD is rare. We experienced one pediatric patient who developed coronary artery aneurysm and acute myocardiac infarction (AMI) during the subacute phase of incomplete and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-nonresponsive KD. The patient was given a good prognosis due to close monitoring and early recognition of AMI. Physicians should carefully monitor KD patients who do not respond to initial IVIG therapy and who show progressive coronary artery dilatation. If such a patient complaints of chest pain and the ECG shows hyperacute T waves, the physician should suspect development of AMI.
Cardiology
Thrombosis in the Left Ventricle after Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Implantation: A Rare Cause of Systemic Thromboembolism
Hee Chan Jung, Woo Baek Chung, Man Young Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):27-31.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.27
  • 5,534 View
  • 74 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This report describes a case of systemic thromboembolism caused by left ventricular (LV) thrombosis that developed after placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). A 27-year-old male patient was diagnosed with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia, and underwent ICD implantation for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Two weeks after ICD implantation, the patient experienced renal infarction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a mobile thrombus at the LV apex, and automated function imaging demonstrated deteriorated LV function after ICD implantation. The RV was not placed by ICD and the mechanical force which was occurred by ICD that led to induced dyssynchronous motion of the LV apex may have resulted in a systemic thromboembolism.
Pulmonary
Total Unilateral Obstruction by Sputum Immediately after Tracheal Bougienage
Kyunam Kim, Jonghun Jun, Miae Jeong, Songlark Choi, Youngsun Lee
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):32-37.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.32
  • 5,790 View
  • 64 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 25-year-old man developed tracheal stenosis due to prolonged intubation for five days. Immediately after bougienage, his left lung was not possible to ventilate and emergency tracheostomy was performed to produce ample space for airflow. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed that his left main bronchus was totally obstructed by sputum at the entrance of the superior and inferior lobar bronchi. Inadequate airway clearance increases the risk of infection and airway obstruction. We suggest chest physiotherapy be applied to all patients in the intensive care unit (ICU), especially patients with tracheal stenosis, due to its positive impact on pulmonary functional ability and ICU stay.
Pulmonary
Extraction of Endobronchial Tooth by Flexible Bronchoscopy Using Fishnet Basket in Patients of Intensive Care Unit with Artificial Airway
Kyung Chan Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):38-42.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.38
  • 6,415 View
  • 83 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Foreign body aspiration into the tracheobronchial tree can cause serious problems. Tooth aspiration can occur during emergency endotracheal intubation. However, removal of a tooth from the airway is difficult because of the round shape and smooth surface of the tooth. Here, I report extraction of a tooth from the airway by flexible bronchoscopy using fishnet basket in intensive care patients. The procedure was performed in six patients. All patients were critically ill with an artificial airway (n = 4; endotracheal tube, n = 2; tracheostomy tube). The tooth location was right bronchial tree in three patients and left bronchial tree in three patients. Tooth extraction failed in two patients because the teeth were impacted in the distal bronchus during bronchoscopy. There was no complication such as life threatening arrhythmia or hypoxemia during the procedure. Using flexible bronchoscopy with a fishnet basket, we were able to extract aspirated teeth from patients with an artificial airway.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Retrieval of Aspirated Teeth in an Adult Polytrauma Patient using Pediatric Flexible Fiberoptic Bronchoscopy Allied with Endoscopic Rat Tooth Alligator Jaw Grasping Forceps
    Ali Al Bshabshe, Omprakash Palanivel, Amer Hassan Assiri, Nasser Mohammed Alwadai
    Indian Journal of Respiratory Care.2020; 9(2): 236.     CrossRef
Hematology/Pulmonary
Delayed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Presenting as Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage
Ji Young Hong, Ji Ye Jung, Young Ae Kang, Yoon Sung Bae, Young Sam Kim, Se Kyu Kim, Joon Chang, Moo Suk Park
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):43-47.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.43
  • 6,919 View
  • 112 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical intravascular hemolytic anemia with schistocytosis, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Pulmonary involvement in HUS is known to be rare. We present the case of a 25-year-old male with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and myocarditis followed by atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. In this case, successful treatments included steroid pulse therapy for the fatal alveolar hemorrhage and plasma exchange for the hemolytic uremic syndrome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Development and pilot implementation of Iranian Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Registry
    Mina Lazem, Nakysa Hooman, Abbas Sheikhtaheri
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Lessons learned from hemolytic uremic syndrome registries: recommendations for implementation
    Mina Lazem, Abbas Sheikhtaheri, Nakysa Hooman
    Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Prevalence and Incidence of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocol Study
    Nakysa Hooman, Mahnaz Sadeghian, Fariba Jahangiri, Soudabeh Hosseini
    Journal of Comprehensive Pediatrics.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Subcapsular liver hematoma as a complication of an atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome
    Emanuel Ferreira, Nuno Oliveira, Maria Marques, Helena Pinto, Ana Santos, Armando Carreira, Mário Campos
    Nefrología (English Edition).2015; 35(3): 337.     CrossRef
  • Subcapsular liver hematoma as a complication of an atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome
    Emanuel Ferreira, Nuno Oliveira, Maria Marques, Helena Pinto, Ana Santos, Armando Carreira, Mário Campos
    Nefrología.2015; 35(3): 337.     CrossRef
Cardiology/Pulmonary
One Hundred Seven Days of ECMO as a Bridge to Lung Transplantation: The Longest Duration Among Elderly Patients
Eun Jung Kim, Hyo Chae Paik, Moo Suk Park, Myung Hwa Kim, Shin Ok Koh, You Jin Lee, Sungwon Na
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):48-51.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.48
  • 4,558 View
  • 75 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a means for supporting adequate gas exchange in patients with severe respiratory failure and is the only therapeutic option for ventilation-refractory patients awaiting lung transplantation. Moreover, defining the patients likely to benefit from ECMO as a bridge to transplantation has recently become a point of interest. Here, we report a case of prolonged ECMO support to a patient awaiting lung transplantation. A 66-year-old woman was diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia and was placed on veno-venous (VV) ECMO due to unsatisfactory gas exchange despite maximal ventilator care. She underwent bilateral lung transplantation after 99 days of ECMO and was successfully weaned from it on the 107th ECMO day. This is the longest period of ECMO support to be reported among elderly patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Long-Term Venovenous Connection for Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal (ECCO2R)–Numerical Investigation of the Connection to the Common Iliac Veins
    N. B. Steuer, K. Hugenroth, T. Beck, J. Spillner, R. Kopp, S. Reinartz, T. Schmitz-Rode, U. Steinseifer, G. Wagner, J. Arens
    Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology.2020; 11(4): 362.     CrossRef
  • One hundred forty six days on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): Our longest ECMO run
    Ahmad Said Abdalmohsen Ali, Mohamed Yosri, Mohamed Abouelwafa, Mahmoud Saad, Kareem Zaki, Shady Mashhour, Husam Salah, Tarek Mohsen, Amaany Abozeid, Mohamed Khaled, Akram Abdelbary, Alia Abdelfattah
    The Egyptian Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2018; 6(3): 113.     CrossRef
  • Recovery from Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome with Long-Run Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
    Jin Jeon, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2014; 29(3): 212.     CrossRef
Cardiology
Successful Use of a Peripheral Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenator in a Patient with Chronic Heart Failure and Pneumonia
Ji Hyun Lee, Yang Hyun Cho, Gee Young Suh, Jeong Hoon Yang
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(1):52-56.   Published online February 28, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.1.52
  • 5,050 View
  • 49 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Myocardial dysfunction can occur during severe sepsis and may accelerate in the condition of chronic decompensated heart failure. A 26-year-old female in remission from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma presented with shock due to chronic heart failure combined with pneumonia. The patient was initially stabilized using a peripheral extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) with antibiotics therapy, followed by left ventricular venting due to pulmonary edema that was complicated by left ventricular distension. Here, we report the successful application of ECMO to a patient with pneumonia underlying doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Although septic conditions remained unclear indication of ECMO, it might be considered a valuable therapeutic option in patients with chronic heart failure.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care