Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

ACC : Acute and Critical Care

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
12 "Won Young Kim"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Effects of high-flow nasal cannula in patients with mild to moderate hypercapnia: a prospective observational study
Kyung Hun Nam, Hyung Koo Kang, Sung-Soon Lee, So-Hee Park, Sung Wook Kang, Jea Jun Hwang, So Young Park, Won Young Kim, Hee Jung Suh, Eun Young Kim, Ga Jin Seo, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Chae-Man Lim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(3):249-255.   Published online July 26, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01102
  • 6,203 View
  • 249 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Evidence for using high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in hypercapnia is still limited. Most of the clinical studies had been conducted retrospectively, and there had been conflicting reports for the effects of HFNC on hypercapnia correction in prospective studies. Therefore, more evidence is needed to understand the effect of the HFNC in hypercapnia.
Methods
We conducted a multicenter prospective observational study after applying HFNC to 45 hospitalized subjects who had moderate hypercapnia (arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide [PaCO2], 43–70 mm Hg) without severe respiratory acidosis (pH <7.30). The primary outcome was a change in PaCO2 level in the first 24 hours of HFNC use. The secondary outcomes were changes in other parameters of arterial blood gas analysis, changes in respiration rates, and clinical outcomes.
Results
There was a significant decrease in PaCO2 in the first hour of HFNC application (-3.80 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6.35 to -1.24; P<0.001). Reduction of PaCO2 was more prominent in subjects who did not have underlying obstructive lung disease. There was a correction in pH, but no significant changes in respiratory rate, bicarbonate, and arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio. Mechanical ventilation was not required for 93.3% (42/45) of our study population.
Conclusions
We suggest that HFNC could be a safe alternative for oxygen delivery in hypercapnia patients who do not need immediate mechanical ventilation. With HFNC oxygenation, correction of hypercapnia could be expected, especially in patients who do not have obstructive lung diseases.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Safety and efficacy of high flow nasal canula in patients with mild hypercapnia
    Mohammed A. Ibrahim, Magdy Emara, Mohammed Shehta
    The Egyptian Journal of Bronchology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Current status of treatment of acute respiratory failure in Korea
    Yong Jun Choi, Jae Hwa Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2022; 65(3): 124.     CrossRef
  • High-flow nasal cannula: Evaluation of the perceptions of various performance aspects among Chinese clinical staff and establishment of a multidimensional clinical evaluation system
    Ruoxuan Wen, Xingshuo Hu, Tengchen Wei, Kaifei Wang, Zhimei Duan, Zhanqi Zhao, Lixin Xie, Fei Xie
    Frontiers in Medicine.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Application Progress of HFNC in Respiratory Diseases
    迪 吴
    Advances in Clinical Medicine.2022; 12(11): 10617.     CrossRef
Infection
Relationship between low hemoglobin levels and mortality in patients with septic shock
Sung Min Jung, Youn-Jung Kim, Seung Mok Ryoo, Won Young Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):141-147.   Published online May 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00465
  • 16,765 View
  • 260 Download
  • 15 Web of Science
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Hemoglobin levels are a critical parameter for oxygen delivery in patients with shock. On comparing target hemoglobin levels upon transfusion initiation, the correlation between the severity of decrease in hemoglobin levels and patient outcomes remains unclear. We evaluated the association between initial hemoglobin levels and mortality in patients with septic shock treated with protocol-driven resuscitation bundle therapy at an emergency department.
Methods
Data of adult patients diagnosed with septic shock between June 2012 and December 2016 were extracted from a prospectively compiled septic shock registry at a single academic medical center. Patients were classified into four groups according to initial hemoglobin levels: ≥9.0 g/dl, 8.0−8.9 g/dl, 7.0−7.9 g/dl, and <7.0 g/dl. The primary endpoint was 90-day mortality.
Results
In total, 2,265 patients (male, 58.3%; median age, 70.0 years [interquartile range, 60 to 78 years]) with septic shock were included. For the four groups, 90-day mortality rates were as follows: 29.1%, 43.0%, 46.5%, and 46.9% for ≥9.0 g/dl (n=1,808), 8.0−8.9 g/dl (n=217), 7.0−7.9 g/dl (n=135), and <7.0 g/dl (n=105), respectively (P<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression showed that initial hemoglobin levels were an independent factor associated with 90-day mortality and mortality proportionally increased with decreasing hemoglobin levels (odds ratio [OR], 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36 to 2.61 for 8.0−8.9 g/dl; OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.31 to 2.95 for 7.0–7.9 g/dl; and OR, 2.35; 95% CI, 1.52 to 3.63 for <7.0 g/dl).
Conclusions
Low hemoglobin levels (<9.0 g/dl) were observed in approximately 20% of patients with septic shock, and the severity of decrease in these levels correlated with mortality.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prognostic value of hemoglobin in patients with sepsis: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Jin Zhu, Yanyan Dong, Pengda Liao, Xin Yin, Jianzhuo He, Liheng Guo
    Heart & Lung.2024; 64: 93.     CrossRef
  • Acute blood loss anemia in hospitalized patients is associated with adverse outcomes: An analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample
    Dhweeja Dasarathy, Amy H. Attaway
    The American Journal of the Medical Sciences.2024; 367(4): 243.     CrossRef
  • Ceftriaxone-induced severe hemolytic anemia, renal calculi, and cholecystolithiasis in a 3-year-old child: a case report and literature review
    Enfu Tao, Huangjia Zhou, Meili Zheng, Yisha Zhao, Junfen Zhou, Junhui Yuan, Tianming Yuan, Changhua Zheng
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Exploring a global interpretation mechanism for deep learning networks when predicting sepsis
    Ethan A. T. Strickler, Joshua Thomas, Johnson P. Thomas, Bruce Benjamin, Rittika Shamsuddin
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Blood count derangements after sepsis and association with post-hospital outcomes
    Scott J. Denstaedt, Jennifer Cano, Xiao Qing Wang, John P. Donnelly, Sarah Seelye, Hallie C. Prescott
    Frontiers in Immunology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Potential therapeutic effect of Carica papaya leaves extract on immune response, biochemical and hematological mechanisms on cecal ligation and puncture model of sepsis in rats: an in vivo study
    Juveria Usmani, Mohd Wasim, Mohd Nazam Ansari, Mohammed Jaseem Hassan, Manju Sharma, Razi Ahmad
    3 Biotech.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mortality among adult patients with sepsis and septic shock in Korea: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Myeong Namgung, Chiwon Ahn, Yeonkyung Park, Il-Youp Kwak, Jungguk Lee, Moonho Won
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2023; 10(2): 157.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Rule for Mortality of Inpatients With Escherichia coli Bacteremia: Chi-Square Automatic Interaction Detector Decision Tree Analysis Model
    Yudai Nakanishi, Sayato Fukui, Akihiro Inui, Daiki Kobayashi, Mizue Saita, Toshio Naito
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Predictive Rule for COVID-19 Pneumonia Among COVID-19 Patients: A Classification and Regression Tree (CART) Analysis Model
    Sayato Fukui, Akihiro Inui, Takayuki Komatsu, Kanako Ogura, Yutaka Ozaki, Manabu Sugita, Mizue Saita, Daiki Kobayashi, Toshio Naito
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Applying artificial neural network in predicting sepsis mortality in the emergency department based on clinical features and complete blood count parameters
    Beata Pui Kwan Wong, Rex Pui Kin Lam, Carrie Yuen Ting Ip, Ho Ching Chan, Lingyun Zhao, Michael Chun Kai Lau, Tat Chi Tsang, Matthew Sik Hon Tsui, Timothy Hudson Rainer
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preexisting Clinical Frailty Is Associated With Worse Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Sepsis*
    Hong Yeul Lee, Jinwoo Lee, Yoon Sun Jung, Woon Yong Kwon, Dong Kyu Oh, Mi Hyeon Park, Chae-Man Lim, Sang-Min Lee
    Critical Care Medicine.2022; 50(5): 780.     CrossRef
  • Clinical assessment of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a potential diagnostic marker for neonatal sepsis: a prospective cohort study
    Dina Midan, Fady El-Gendy, Dalia Abo ELAlla, Mayada Kotb
    Annals of Medicine.2022; 54(1): 1725.     CrossRef
  • A Decrease in Hb and Hypoproteinemia: Possible Predictors of Complications in Neonates with Late-Onset Sepsis in a Developing Country
    Na Cai, Wei Liao, Zhiqiang Chen, Min Tao, Sheng Chen
    International Journal of General Medicine.2022; Volume 15: 6583.     CrossRef
  • Impact of 1-Hour Bundle Achievement in Septic Shock
    Byuk Sung Ko, Sung-Hyuk Choi, Tae Gun Shin, Kyuseok Kim, You Hwan Jo, Seung Mok Ryoo, Yoo Seok Park, Woon Yong Kwon, Han Sung Choi, Sung Phil Chung, Gil Joon Suh, Hyunggoo Kang, Tae Ho Lim, Donghee Son, Won Young Kim
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(3): 527.     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Haematocrit on Measurement of the Mid-Infrared Refractive Index of Plasma in Whole Blood
    David J. Rowe, Daniel R. Owens, Suzanne L. Parker, Saul N. Faust, James S. Wilkinson, Goran Z. Mashanovich
    Biosensors.2021; 11(11): 417.     CrossRef
  • Early Hemoglobin Status as a Predictor of Long-Term Mortality for Sepsis Patients in Intensive Care Units
    Desheng Qi, Milin Peng
    Shock.2021; 55(2): 215.     CrossRef
  • Immature granulocyte and mean platelet volume as a predictor of 30-day postoperative mortality in patients with sepsis caused by peritonitis
    RudiHartono Sinaga, Arie Utariani, Puspa Wardhani, Hardiono Hardiono
    Bali Journal of Anesthesiology.2020; 4(4): 166.     CrossRef
CPR/Resuscitation
Utility of the early lactate area score as a prognostic marker for septic shock patients in the emergency department
Gina Yu, Seung Joon Yoo, Sang-Hun Lee, June Sung Kim, Sungmin Jung, Youn-Jung Kim, Won Young Kim, Seung Mok Ryoo
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):126-132.   Published online April 12, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00283
  • 16,868 View
  • 281 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The current Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines recommend the remeasurement of lactate levels if the initial lactate level is elevated; however, the prognostic value of lactate kinetics is limited and inconsistent. We attempted to determine the efficacy of the lactate area score (calculated from repeated lactate measurements during initial resuscitation) as a prognostic marker of septic shock in the emergency department (ED).
Methods
We performed a retrospective study of adult patients with septic shock in the ED of a single tertiary medical center. Serial lactate levels were measured five times within 12 hours. We also compared the initial lactate level, maximum lactate level, and lactate area score. The lactate area score was defined as the sum of the area under the curve measured at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours following the initial measurement.
Results
A total of 362 patients were enrolled in this study, and the overall 28-day mortality was 31.8%. The lactate area score of serial lactate levels as well as the initial (median [interquartile range], 4.9 [3.4 to 10.5]; P=0.003) and maximum (7.3 [4.2 to 13.2]; P<0.001) lactate levels were significantly higher in the non-survivor group. However, in multivariate analysis, only the lactate area score (odds ratio, 1.013; 95% confidence interval, 1.007 to 1.019) was significantly associated with 28-day mortality.
Conclusions
The early lactate area score may be a possible prognostic marker for predicting the 28-day mortality of adult septic shock patients. Further prospective interventional studies should be conducted to validate our results.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between normalized lactate load and in-hospital mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction
    Yue Wu, Nannan Huang, Tienan Sun, Biyang Zhang, Shiyu Zhang, Pengyu Zhang, Chunxia Zhang
    International Journal of Cardiology.2024; 399: 131658.     CrossRef
  • Electrochemical Detection of Biomarkers Via Affinity Binding with Functionalized Nanocomposite for Assessment of Tissue-Perfusion
    Ariadna Schuck, Minhee Kang, Yong-Sang Kim
    Journal of Electrical Engineering & Technology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Role of lactate level in predicting admission need to intensive care unit and short term outcomes in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding
    Hekmat Nashat Shawky, Hala Mostafa Kamel, Zain Elabdeen Ahmed Sayed, Hossam Mahmoud Abdelwahab
    The Egyptian Journal of Internal Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hierarchical Capability in Distinguishing Severities of Sepsis via Serum Lactate: A Network Meta-Analysis
    Binlu Zhu, Ruixi Zhou, Jiangwei Qin, Yifei Li
    Biomedicines.2024; 12(2): 447.     CrossRef
  • Serial evaluation of the serum lactate level with the SOFA score to predict mortality in patients with sepsis
    Heemoon Park, Jinwoo Lee, Dong Kyu Oh, Mi Hyeon Park, Chae-Man Lim, Sang-Min Lee, Hong Yeul Lee
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Using time-course as an essential factor to accurately predict sepsis-associated mortality among patients with suspected sepsis
    Shih-Chieh Yen, Chin-Chieh Wu, Yi-Ju Tseng, Chih-Huang Li, Kuan-Fu Chen
    Biomedical Journal.2023; : 100632.     CrossRef
  • Increased normalized lactate load is associated with higher mortality in both sepsis and non-sepsis patients: an analysis of the MIMIC-IV database
    Han Chen, Shu-Rong Gong, Rong-Guo Yu
    BMC Anesthesiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An integrated wearable microneedle array for the continuous monitoring of multiple biomarkers in interstitial fluid
    Farshad Tehrani, Hazhir Teymourian, Brian Wuerstle, Jonathan Kavner, Ravi Patel, Allison Furmidge, Reza Aghavali, Hamed Hosseini-Toudeshki, Christopher Brown, Fangyu Zhang, Kuldeep Mahato, Zhengxing Li, Abbas Barfidokht, Lu Yin, Paul Warren, Nickey Huang,
    Nature Biomedical Engineering.2022; 6(11): 1214.     CrossRef
  • Association between normalized lactate load and mortality in patients with septic shock: an analysis of the MIMIC-III database
    Han Chen, Shu-Rong Gong, Rong-Guo Yu
    BMC Anesthesiology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Mortality prediction using a novel combination of biomarkers in the first day of sepsis in intensive care units
    Junkun Liu, Chengwen Bai, Binbin Li, Aijun Shan, Fei Shi, Can Yao, Yu Zhang, Jin Wang, Weibu Chen, Manying Xie, Dehui Deng
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Graphene-Based Enzymatic Biosensor Using a Common-Gate Field-Effect Transistor for L-Lactic Acid Detection in Blood Plasma Samples
    Ariadna Schuck, Hyo Eun Kim, Júlia Konzen Moreira, Priscila Schmidt Lora, Yong-Sang Kim
    Sensors.2021; 21(5): 1852.     CrossRef
  • Usefulness of presepsin in predicting the prognosis of patients with sepsis or septic shock: a retrospective cohort study
    Jeong Suk Koh, Yoon Joo Kim, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee, Song-I Lee
    Yeungnam University Journal of Medicine.2021; 38(4): 318.     CrossRef
  • Non-enzymatic lactic acid sensor based on AuPtNPs functionalized MoS2 nanosheet as electrode modified materials
    Haolin Xiao, Liangli Cao, Huishan Qin, Shanshan Wei, Miao Gu, Feijun Zhao, Zhencheng Chen
    Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry.2021; 903: 115806.     CrossRef
  • Early lactate area scores and serial blood lactate levels as prognostic markers for patients with septic shock: a systematic review
    Rozita Khodashahi, Soroush Sarjamee
    Infectious Diseases.2020; 52(7): 451.     CrossRef
  • Recent lactate findings: is repeated serum lactate testing necessary in septic shock patients?
    Moo Suk Park
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(2): 155.     CrossRef
Case Report
Cardiology
Acute fulminant myocarditis following influenza vaccination requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
Youn-Jung Kim, Jun-Il Bae, Seung Mok Ryoo, Won Young Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):165-169.   Published online November 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00045
  • 10,444 View
  • 194 Download
  • 24 Web of Science
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The inactivated influenza vaccination is generally safe with mostly mild side effects. We report a rare but fatal adverse event following influenza vaccination. A previously healthy 27-yearold woman who received the influenza vaccination 3 days before presenting to the emergency department had rapidly aggravating dyspnea and mental deterioration. She was diagnosed as having acute fulminant myocarditis with refractory cardiogenic shock, which was successfully managed with veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The cardiac function of the patient recovered in 3 weeks.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Active surveillance for adverse events of influenza vaccine safety in elderly cancer patients using self-controlled tree-temporal scan statistic analysis
    Na-Young Jeong, Chung-Jong Kim, Sang Min Park, Ye-Jee Kim, Joongyub Lee, Nam-Kyong Choi
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Incidence of Myocarditis Following an Influenza Vaccination: A Population-Based Observational Study
    Wen-Hwa Wang, Kai-Che Wei, Yu-Tung Huang, Kuang-Hua Huang, Tung-Han Tsai, Yu-Chia Chang
    Drugs & Aging.2023; 40(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of COVID-19 Vaccine-Associated Myocarditis and Viral Myocarditis Pathology
    Kamron Reza Hamedi, Gannett Loftus, Lawson Traylor, Richard Goodwin, Sergio Arce
    Vaccines.2023; 11(2): 362.     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis and autoimmunity
    Akira Matsumori
    Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy.2023; 21(6): 437.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with acute myocarditis and chronic inflammatory cardiomyopathy
    Federico Caobelli, Jordi Broncano Cabrero, Nicola Galea, Philip Haaf, Christian Loewe, Julian A. Luetkens, Giuseppe Muscogiuri, Marco Francone
    The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging.2023; 39(11): 2221.     CrossRef
  • Clinical Syndromes Related to SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Vaccination in Pediatric Age: A Narrative Review
    Maria Vincenza Mastrolia, Camilla De Cillia, Michela Orlandi, Sarah Abu-Rumeileh, Ilaria Maccora, Valerio Maniscalco, Edoardo Marrani, Ilaria Pagnini, Gabriele Simonini
    Medicina.2023; 59(11): 2027.     CrossRef
  • Acute Lymphocyte Myocarditis Associated with Influenza Vaccination
    Ryo Nakamura, Shin-ichi Ando, Seiya Kato, Toshiaki Kadokami
    Internal Medicine.2022; 61(15): 2307.     CrossRef
  • Clinically Suspected Myocarditis Temporally Related to COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents and Young Adults: Suspected Myocarditis After COVID-19 Vaccination
    Dongngan T. Truong, Audrey Dionne, Juan Carlos Muniz, Kimberly E. McHugh, Michael A. Portman, Linda M. Lambert, Deepika Thacker, Matthew D. Elias, Jennifer S. Li, Olga H. Toro-Salazar, Brett R. Anderson, Andrew M. Atz, C. Monique Bohun, M. Jay Campbell, M
    Circulation.2022; 145(5): 345.     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis following rAd26 and rAd5 vector‐based COVID‐19 vaccine: case report
    Farah Naghashzadeh, Shadi Shafaghi, Atosa Dorudinia, Seyed Alireza Naji, Majid Marjani, Ahmad Amin, Arezoo Mohamadifar, Sima Noorali, Babak Sharif Kashani
    ESC Heart Failure.2022; 9(2): 1483.     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis following COVID-19 vaccination in adolescents and adults: a cumulative experience of 2021
    Onyedika J. Ilonze, Maya E. Guglin
    Heart Failure Reviews.2022; 27(6): 2033.     CrossRef
  • Chest Pain and Suspected Myocarditis Related to COVID-19 Vaccination in Adolescents—A Case Series
    Da-Eun Roh, Hyejin Na, Jung-Eun Kwon, Insu Choi, Yeo-Hyang Kim, Hwa-Jin Cho
    Children.2022; 9(5): 693.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac Adverse Events after Vaccination—A Systematic Review
    Kanak Parmar, Sai Subramanyam, Gaspar Del Rio-Pertuz, Pooja Sethi, Erwin Argueta-Sosa
    Vaccines.2022; 10(5): 700.     CrossRef
  • A case of myocarditis after COVID-19 vaccination: incidental or consequential?
    Leona S. Alizadeh, Vitali Koch, Ibrahim Yel, Leon D. Grünewald, Daniel Mathies, Simon Martin, Thomas J. Vogl, Dominic Rauschning, Christian Booz
    Heliyon.2022; 8(6): e09537.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 Vaccination and the Rate of Immune and Autoimmune Adverse Events Following Immunization: Insights From a Narrative Literature Review
    Naim Mahroum, Noy Lavine, Aviran Ohayon, Ravend Seida, Abdulkarim Alwani, Mahmoud Alrais, Magdi Zoubi, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi
    Frontiers in Immunology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 vaccination and carditis in children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Oscar Hou In Chou, Jonathan Mui, Cheuk To Chung, Danny Radford, Simon Ranjithkumar, Endurance Evbayekha, Ronald Nam, Levent Pay, Danish Iltaf Satti, Sebastian Garcia-Zamora, George Bazoukis, Göksel Çinier, Sharen Lee, Vassilios S. Vassiliou, Tong Liu, Gar
    Clinical Research in Cardiology.2022; 111(10): 1161.     CrossRef
  • Myopericarditis after vaccination, Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), 1990–2018
    John R. Su, Michael M. McNeil, Kerry J. Welsh, Paige L. Marquez, Carmen Ng, Ming Yan, Maria V. Cano
    Vaccine.2021; 39(5): 839.     CrossRef
  • Sipuleucel‐T associated inflammatory cardiomyopathy: a case report and observations from a large pharmacovigilance database
    Melissa Y.Y. Moey, Rahim A. Jiwani, Kotaro Takeda, Karyn Prenshaw, R. Wayne Kreeger, John Inzerillo, Darla K. Liles, C. Bogdan Marcu, Bénédicte Lebrun‐Vignes, D. Lynn Morris, Sivakumar Ardhanari, Joe‐Elie Salem
    ESC Heart Failure.2021; 8(4): 3360.     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis following COVID-19 vaccination
    Elisabeth Albert, Gerard Aurigemma, Jason Saucedo, David S. Gerson
    Radiology Case Reports.2021; 16(8): 2142.     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis and Other Cardiovascular Complications of the mRNA-Based COVID-19 Vaccines
    Mahesh K Vidula, Marietta Ambrose, Helene Glassberg, Neel Chokshi, Tiffany Chen, Victor A Ferrari, Yuchi Han
    Cureus.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Patients With Acute Myocarditis Following mRNA COVID-19 Vaccination
    Han W. Kim, Elizabeth R. Jenista, David C. Wendell, Clerio F. Azevedo, Michael J. Campbell, Stephen N. Darty, Michele A. Parker, Raymond J. Kim
    JAMA Cardiology.2021; 6(10): 1196.     CrossRef
  • Acute myocarditis following Comirnaty vaccination in a healthy man with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection
    Anna Patrignani, Nicolò Schicchi, Francesca Calcagnoli, Elena Falchetti, Nino Ciampani, Giulio Argalia, Antonio Mariani
    Radiology Case Reports.2021; 16(11): 3321.     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis and pericarditis after vaccination for COVID‐19
    Blake Hudson, Ryan Mantooth, Matthew DeLaney
    Journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians Open.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Myocarditis, Pericarditis and Cardiomyopathy After COVID-19 Vaccination
    Salvatore Pepe, Ann T. Gregory, A. Robert Denniss
    Heart, Lung and Circulation.2021; 30(10): 1425.     CrossRef
  • Cardiac Manifestations of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) Following COVID-19
    Eveline Y. Wu, M. Jay Campbell
    Current Cardiology Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hemodynamic Collapse After Influenza Vaccination: A Vaccine-Induced Fulminant Myocarditis?
    Nobutaka Nagano, Toshiyuki Yano, Yugo Fujita, Masayuki Koyama, Ryo Hasegawa, Jun Nakata, Ryo Nishikawa, Naoto Murakami, Takefumi Fujito, Atsushi Mochizuki, Hidemichi Kouzu, Atsuko Muranaka, Nobuaki Kokubu, Tetsuji Miura
    Canadian Journal of Cardiology.2020; 36(9): 1554.e5.     CrossRef
  • Fatal influenza myocarditis with incessant ventricular tachycardia
    Nidhi Saraiya, Supriya Singh, Marilou Corpuz
    BMJ Case Reports.2019; 12(7): e228201.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Basic science and research
Anti-inflammatory Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Acute Lung Injury Mouse Model
Jin Won Huh, Won Young Kim, Yun Young Park, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Mi-Jung Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):154-161.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00619
  • 6,137 View
  • 189 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate injury in various lung injury models through paracrine effects. We hypothesized that intratracheal transplantation of allogenic MSCs could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice, mediated by anti-inflammatory responses.
Methods
Six-week-old male mice were randomized to either the control or the ALI group. ALI was induced by intratracheal LPS instillation. Four hours after LPS instillation, MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline was randomly intratracheally administered. Neutrophil count and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung histology; levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2; and the expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), caspase-3, and caspase-9 were evaluated at 48 hours after injury.
Results
Treatment with MSCs attenuated lung injury in ALI mice by decreasing protein level and neutrophil recruitment into the BALF and improving the histologic change. MSCs also decreased the protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, but had little effect on the protein expression of PCNA, caspase-3, and caspase-9.
Conclusions
Intratracheal injection of bone marrow-derived allogenic MSCs attenuates LPSinduced ALI via immunomodulatory effects.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effectiveness of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mixed with Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Healing of Inflammatory Bowel Anastomoses: A Pre-Clinical Study in Rats
    Georgios Geropoulos, Kyriakos Psarras, Maria Papaioannou, Vasileios Geropoulos, Argyri Niti, Christina Nikolaidou, Georgios Koimtzis, Nikolaos Symeonidis, Efstathios T. Pavlidis, Georgios Koliakos, Theodoros E. Pavlidis, Ioannis Galanis
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Cyclic Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Primed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice
    Youngheon Park, Jimin Jang, Jooyeon Lee, Hyosin Baek, Jaehyun Park, Sang-Ryul Cha, Se Bi Lee, Sunghun Na, Jae-Woo Kwon, Seok-Ho Hong, Se-Ran Yang
    International Journal of Stem Cells.2023; 16(2): 191.     CrossRef
  • Mesenchymal stem cells and their derived exosomes to combat Covid–19
    Maryam Yousefi Dehbidi, Nima Goodarzi, Mohammad H. Azhdari, Mohammad Doroudian
    Reviews in Medical Virology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stem Cell‐based therapies for COVID‐19‐related acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Hoi Wa Ngai, Dae Hong Kim, Mohamed Hammad, Margarita Gutova, Karen Aboody, Christopher D. Cox
    Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.2022; 26(9): 2483.     CrossRef
  • Development of a physiomimetic model of acute respiratory distress syndrome by using ECM hydrogels and organ-on-a-chip devices
    Esther Marhuenda, Alvaro Villarino, Maria Narciso, Linda Elowsson, Isaac Almendros, Gunilla Westergren-Thorsson, Ramon Farré, Núria Gavara, Jorge Otero
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Advances in mesenchymal stromal cell therapy for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Chang Liu, Kun Xiao, Lixin Xie
    Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Auxiliary role of mesenchymal stem cells as regenerative medicine soldiers to attenuate inflammatory processes of severe acute respiratory infections caused by COVID-19
    Peyvand Parhizkar Roudsari, Sepideh Alavi-Moghadam, Moloud Payab, Forough Azam Sayahpour, Hamid Reza Aghayan, Parisa Goodarzi, Fereshteh Mohamadi-jahani, Bagher Larijani, Babak Arjmand
    Cell and Tissue Banking.2020; 21(3): 405.     CrossRef
  • The Role of MSC Therapy in Attenuating the Damaging Effects of the Cytokine Storm Induced by COVID-19 on the Heart and Cardiovascular System
    Georgina M. Ellison-Hughes, Liam Colley, Katie A. O'Brien, Kirsty A. Roberts, Thomas A. Agbaedeng, Mark D. Ross
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
CPR/Resuscitation
APACHE II Score Immediately after Cardiac Arrest as a Predictor of Good Neurological Outcome in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Patients Receiving Targeted Temperature Management
Sang-Il Kim, Youn-Jung Kim, You-Jin Lee, Seung Mok Ryoo, Chang Hwan Sohn, Dong Woo Seo, Yoon-Seon Lee, Jae Ho Lee, Kyoung Soo Lim, Won Young Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(2):83-88.   Published online May 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2017.00514
  • 6,332 View
  • 99 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
This study assessed the association between the initial Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and good neurological outcome in comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received targeted temperature management (TTM).
Methods
Data from survivors of cardiac arrest who received TTM between January 2011 and June 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. The initial APACHE II score was determined using the data immediately collected after return of spontaneous circulation rather than within 24 hours after being admitted to the intensive care unit. Good neurological outcome, defined as Cerebral Performance Category 1 or 2 on day 28, was the primary outcome of this study.
Results
Among 143 survivors of cardiac arrest who received TTM, 62 (43.4%) survived, and 34 (23.8%) exhibited good neurological outcome on day 28. The initial APACHE II score was significantly lower in the patients with good neurological outcome than in those with poor neurological outcome (23.71 ± 4.39 vs. 27.62 ± 6.16, P = 0.001). The predictive ability of the initial APACHE II score for good neurological outcome, assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was 0.697 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.599 to 0.795; P = 0.001). The initial APACHE II score was associated with good neurological outcome after adjusting for confounders (odds ratio, 0.878; 95% CI, 0.792 to 0.974; P = 0.014).
Conclusions
In the present study, the APACHE II score calculated in the immediate post-cardiac arrest period was associated with good neurological outcome. The initial APACHE II score might be useful for early identification of good neurological outcome.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prediction performance of scoring systems after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Boldizsár Kiss, Rita Nagy, Tamás Kói, Andrea Harnos, István Ferenc Édes, Pál Ábrahám, Henriette Mészáros, Péter Hegyi, Endre Zima, Jignesh K. Patel
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(2): e0293704.     CrossRef
  • Predicting the survivals and favorable neurologic outcomes after targeted temperature management by artificial neural networks
    Wei-Ting Chiu, Chen-Chih Chung, Chien-Hua Huang, Yu-san Chien, Chih-Hsin Hsu, Cheng-Hsueh Wu, Chen-Hsu Wang, Hung-Wen Chiu, Lung Chan
    Journal of the Formosan Medical Association.2022; 121(2): 490.     CrossRef
  • Artificial neural network-boosted Cardiac Arrest Survival Post-Resuscitation In-hospital (CASPRI) score accurately predicts outcome in cardiac arrest patients treated with targeted temperature management
    Szu-Yi Chou, Oluwaseun Adebayo Bamodu, Wei-Ting Chiu, Chien-Tai Hong, Lung Chan, Chen-Chih Chung
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Novel Approaches to Risk Stratification of In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
    Jason J. Yang, Xiao Hu, Noel G. Boyle, Duc H. Do
    Current Cardiovascular Risk Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Infection/Hematology
The Prevalence and Significance of Overt Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Patients with Septic Shock in the Emergency Department According to the Third International Consensus Definition
Byuk Sung Ko, Hyun Young Cho, Seung Mok Ryoo, Myung Chun Kim, Woong Jung, Sung Hyuk Park, Chang Min Lee, Won Young Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2016;31(4):334-341.   Published online November 30, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2016.00339
  • 9,413 View
  • 174 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
The prevalence and prognostic value of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in patients with septic shock presenting to emergency departments (EDs) is poorly understood, particularly following the release of a new definition of septic shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and prognostic value of DIC in septic shock.
Methods
We performed retrospective review of 391 consecutive patients with septic shock admitting to the ED of tertiary care, university-affiliated hospital during a 16-month. Septic shock was defined as fluid-unresponsive hypotension requiring vasopressor to maintain a mean arterial pressure of 65 mmHg or greater, and serum lactate level ≥ 2 mmol/L. Overt DIC was defined as an International Society on Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) score ≥ 5 points. The primary endpoint was 28-day mortality.
Results
Of 391 patients with septic shock, 290 were included in the present study. The mean age was 65.6 years, the 28-day mortality rate was 26.9%, and the prevalence of overt DIC was 17.6% (n = 51) according to the ISTH score. The median DIC score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (5.0 vs. 2.0, p = 0.001). Significant higher risk of mortality was observed in overt DIC patients compared to those without (28.2% vs. 13.7%, p = 0.005). Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified DIC to be independently associated with 28-day mortality (odds ratio, 2.689 [95% confidence interval, 1.390-5.201]).
Conclusions
Using the ISTH criteria of DIC, overt DIC in septic shock was found to be common among patients admitting to the ED and to be associated with higher mortality when it is accompanied with septic shock. Efforts are required to identify presence of overt DIC during the initial treatment of septic shock in patients presenting the the ED.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Which Septic Shock Patients With Non-Overt DIC Progress to DIC After Admission? Point-of-Care Thromboelastography Testing
    Sang-Min Kim, Sang-Il Kim, Gina Yu, Youn-Jung Kim, Won Young Kim
    Shock.2022; 57(2): 168.     CrossRef
  • Dysregulated haemostasis in thrombo-inflammatory disease
    Paula A. Klavina, Gemma Leon, Annie M. Curtis, Roger J.S. Preston
    Clinical Science.2022; 136(24): 1809.     CrossRef
  • Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy in Critically Ill Patients in Amman, Jordan
    Eman Mahmoud Qasim Emleek, Amani Anwar Khalil
    Biological Research For Nursing.2021; 23(4): 689.     CrossRef
  • Features of Development and Course of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Syndrome During Surgical Interventions in Children with Oncological Diseases
    N. P. Leonov, V. V. Schukin, G. A. Novichkova, M. A. Maschan, F. I. Ataullakhanov, S. S. Yashin, A. M. Zeynalov, Е. A. Spiridonova
    General Reanimatology.2020; 16(3): 54.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between low hemoglobin levels and mortality in patients with septic shock
    Sung Min Jung, Youn-Jung Kim, Seung Mok Ryoo, Won Young Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2019; 34(2): 141.     CrossRef
Case Report
Toxicology
Methemoglobinemia Caused by an Inert Ingredient after Intentional Ingestion of Pesticide
Ru Bi Jeong, Chang Hwan Sohn, Dong Woo Seo, Won Young Kim, Seung Mok Ryoo, Bum Jin Oh, Kyoung Soo Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2014;29(4):341-343.   Published online November 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2014.29.4.341
  • 5,032 View
  • 71 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
We report two cases of toxic methemoglobinemia caused by an inert ingredient in pesticide product after intentional ingestion of pesticide. First, 51-year-old male visited to the emergency department (ED) after the ingestion of pesticide in a suicide attempt. Initial methemoglobin (MetHb) level was 25.6%. We did not know the cause of methemoglobinemia at that time. Second, 56-year-old female visited to the ED after the ingestion of the same pesticide in a suicide attempt. MetHb level after 30 minutes was 16.1%. The patients were treated with methylene blue. We contacted to the Korean Rural Development Administration and estimated that magnesium nitrate was more likely to cause methemoglobinemia. This report highlights the importance of considering the possibility of methemoglobinemia caused by inert ingredient in pesticide and early antidotal therapy.
Original Articles
Clinical Feature and Prognostic Factors of Emphysematous Pyelonephritis
Won Soek Yang, Won Young Kim, Chang Hwan Sohn, Dong Woo Seo, Jae Ho Lee, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(2):89-93.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.2.89
  • 2,528 View
  • 36 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare and potentially life-threatening condition that requires prompt evaluation and management. However, its clinical presentation and outcomes vary widely. This study was conducted to ascertain the clinical features and prognostic factors regarding EPN.
METHODS
All patients diagnosed with EPN radiologically and treated at the emergency department in the university-affiliated, tertiary-referral center, from January 1999 to December 2009 were evaluated. The patients' demographic and clinical characteristics, computed tomographic findings, treatment, and outcomes were analyzed retrospectively.
RESULTS
Overall 14 patients diagnosed with EPN were admitted. There were 12 females and 2 males. A history of diabetes was found in 12 (85.7%) patients and was the most common comorbidity. The chief complaint among patients was flank pain (42.9%). Severe sepsis or septic shock was noted in 10 (71.4%) patients. Thirteen cases had unilateral involvement and one case had bilateral involvement. More than half of patients had Escherichia.coli in culture. Mean serum levels of HbA1c, creatinine, C-reactive protein (CRP) were 9.4 +/- 2.7, 2.4 +/- 1.4 mg/dl, and 22.4 +/- 13.1 mg/dl. Eight (57.1%) patients received antibiotic treatment alone and four (28.6%) patients received the concurrent percutaneous drainage as well as antibiotics. Hospital mortality was 7.1%. A higher initial serum CRP level (20.3 vs. 49.8 mg/dl, p = 0.02) and HbA1c level (8.7 vs. 16.4, p = 0.01) was associated with hospital mortality.
CONCLUSIONS
Antibiotics alone provide a high success rate for the treatment of EPN. Higher serum CRP and HbA1c level was associated with a higher mortality rate in patients with EPN.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of Kidney Computed Tomographic Findings in Patients with Acute Pyelonephritis and Septic Shock
    Soonseong Kwon, Sangchan Jin, Wooik Choi, Sungjin Kim
    Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2013; 28(4): 272.     CrossRef
Initiation of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy and Clinical Outcome in Septic Shock Patients with Acute Kidney Injury
Seung Mok Ryoo, Won Young Kim, Sang Sik Choi, Jin Won Huh, Sang Bum Hong, Chae Man Lim, Younsuck Koh
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2012;27(1):29-35.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2012.27.1.29
  • 2,456 View
  • 25 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT) in critically ill septic shock patients with acute kidney injury is highly subjective and may influence outcome. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between initiation of RRT and 28 day mortality in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (SSSS).
METHODS
All patients diagnosed with SSSS and treated at the medical intensive care unit (ICU) in university-affiliated hospital from January 2005 to December 2006 were reviewed. Initiation of RRT was stratified into "early" and "late" by RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, and End-stage) criteria and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) at the time RRT began. The primary outcome was death after 28 days from any cause.
RESULTS
Of the 326 patients diagnosed with SSSS and admitted into the medical ICU during the study period, 78 patients received RRT. Mean age was 61.5 +/- 14.7 years old and 54 patients were male (69.2%). The initiation of RRT was categorized into early (Risk, and Injury) and late (Failure) by RIFLE criteria and also categorized into early (BUN < 75 mg/dl) and late (BUN > or = 75 mg/dl). When the relationship between RIFLE criteria and 28 day mortality was compared, no significant difference was shown (70.8% vs. 73.3%, p = 0.81). The initiation of RRT by BUN also showed no significant difference in 28 day mortality (77.3% vs. 69.6%, p = 0.50).
CONCLUSIONS
Initiation of RRT, stratified into "early" and "late" by RIFLE and BUN, showed no significant difference in 28 day mortality regarding patient with SSSS.
The Usefulness of a Triage Kit for Detecting Abused Drugs
Myoung Kwan Kwak, Won Young Kim, Hui Dong Kang, Jae Ho Lee, Bum Jin Oh, Won Kim, Kyoung Soo Lim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2009;24(2):75-79.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2009.24.2.75
  • 2,853 View
  • 32 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
The recovery and outcome of intoxicated patients depends on the kind of drugs they took and the total time of their initial management. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a Triage drug kit for detecting abused drugs.
METHODS
From 2003 Feb. to 2003 July, we studied the patients who visited the emergency department with suspicious drug intoxication. In this case, we used a Triage drug kit for 134 patients with drug intoxication or who were clinically suspected of taking illegal drugs, with 30 of the patients initially admitting the substance they had used. The kit is an immunoassay kit for qualitative testing drug metabolites in urine. To compare with those cases of the preceding year, we studied 104 patients with drug intoxication that was detected between February 2002 and July 2002.
RESULTS
Overall, 60% of the 30 cases who did not know what substance they abused and tested positive for, and 33% of the 27 cases with suspected intoxication confirmed their substance abuse. The positive rate for benzodiazepine use was the highest (46.7%), and there were no positive results regarding amphetamine, methamphetamine or cocaine. An appropriate antidote was administered significantly more frequently in the group for which we used the kit.
CONCLUSIONS
A Triage drug kit is probably useful for diagnosing acute drug intoxication and for identifying the causative substance. However, the time required to decide whether or not a patient should be admitted is not reduced. If the kit can detect the frequently abused drugs in Korea, it will be helpful for treating drug intoxicated patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Clinical features of adolescents with suicide attempt and the factors associated with their outcomes: poisoning versus non-poisoning
    Myoung Hoon Lee, Jae Ho Jang, Jin-Seong Cho, Woo Sung Choi, Jea Yeon Choi
    Pediatric Emergency Medicine Journal.2020; 7(2): 85.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the Triage TOX Drug Screen Assay for Detection of 11 Drugs of Abuse and Therapeutic Drugs
    Hae In Bang, Mi-Ae Jang, Yong-Wha Lee
    Annals of Laboratory Medicine.2017; 37(6): 522.     CrossRef
Case Report
Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumothorax Occurred during Patient Transfer to Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report
Yoonki Lee, Won Young Kim
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2004;19(1):52-56.
  • 1,697 View
  • 64 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
A 48 years old female patient was scheduled for emergency surgery due to bleeding after intracerebral aneurysmal clipping under general anesthesia. Previously checked chest X-ray taken just a few hours before surgery showed no abnormal finding and she didn't show any sign of pneumothorax or hemothorax including dyspnea, tachypnea or cyanosis. Surgery was uneventful. After the completion of surgery, patient was transferred to the neurosurgical intensive care unit with intubation. During transfer, patient showed bucking and signs of subcutaneous emphysema around chest, shoulder and face. Oxygen saturation was low when she admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit, so the ventilator care was started. The patient's oxygenation were getting worse progressively, so we checked chest AP several times and one of the chest X-ray taken at that time revealed no vascular and lung marking on the left lung field suggesting pneumothorax. Emergency chest tube drainage was performed. She recovered dramatically and three days later, ches X-ray showed the complete resorption of the pneumothorax.

ACC : Acute and Critical Care