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Review Article
Pulmonary
Lung ultrasound for evaluation of dyspnea: a pictorial review
Aparna Murali, Anjali Prakash, Rashmi Dixit, Monica Juneja, Naresh Kumar
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(4):502-515.   Published online November 21, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00780
  • 5,234 View
  • 537 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Lung ultrasound is based on the analysis of ultrasound artifacts generated by the pleura and air within the lungs. In recent years, lung ultrasound has emerged as an important alternative for quick evaluation of the patient at the bedside. Several techniques and protocols for performing lung ultrasound have been described in the literature, with the most popular one being the Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency (BLUE) protocol which can be utilized to diagnose the cause of acute dyspnea at the bedside. We attempt to provide a simplified approach to understanding the physics behind the artifacts used in lung ultrasound, the imaging techniques, and the application of the BLUE protocol to diagnose the commonly presenting causes of acute dyspnea.
Original Articles
Pulmonary
Effect of prone positioning on gas exchange according to lung morphology in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome
Na Young Kim, Si Mong Yoon, Jimyung Park, Jinwoo Lee, Sang-Min Lee, Hong Yeul Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):322-331.   Published online July 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00367
  • 2,540 View
  • 217 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
There are limited data on the clinical effects of prone positioning according to lung morphology. We aimed to determine whether the gas exchange response to prone positioning differs according to lung morphology.
Methods
This retrospective study included adult patients with moderate-to-severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The lung morphology of ARDS was assessed by chest computed tomography scan and classified as “diffuse” or “focal.” The primary outcome was change in partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio after the first prone positioning session: first, using the entire cohort, and second, using subgroups of patients with diffuse ARDS matched 2 to 1 with patients with focal ARDS at baseline.
Results
Ninety-five patients were included (focal ARDS group, 23; diffuse ARDS group, 72). Before prone positioning, the focal ARDS group showed worse oxygenation than the diffuse ARDS group (median PaO2/FiO2 ratio, 79.9 mm Hg [interquartile range (IQR)], 67.7–112.6 vs. 104.0 mm Hg [IQR, 77.6–135.7]; P=0.042). During prone positioning, the focal ARDS group showed a greater improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio than the diffuse ARDS group (median, 55.8 mm Hg [IQR, 11.1–109.2] vs. 42.8 mm Hg [IQR, 11.6–83.2]); however, the difference was not significant (P=0.705). Among the PaO2/FiO2-matched cohort, there was no significant difference in change in PaO2/FiO2 ratio after prone positioning between the groups (P=0.904).
Conclusions
In patients with moderate-to-severe ARDS, changes in PaO2/FiO2 ratio after prone positioning did not differ according to lung morphology. Therefore, prone positioning can be considered as soon as indicated, regardless of ARDS lung morphology.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Subphenotypes of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Advancing Towards Precision Medicine
    Andrea R. Levine, Carolyn S. Calfee
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.2024; 87(1): 1.     CrossRef
Nephrology
Clinical efficacy of blood purification using a polymethylmethacrylate hemofilter for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis
Kiyohiko Kinjoh, Ryoji Nagamura, Yutaka Sakuda, Shoki Yamauchi, Hideta Takushi, Tadashi Iraha, Koji Idomari
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(3):398-406.   Published online July 5, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00192
  • 2,774 View
  • 180 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is a systemic inflammatory disease, and it can often complicate into acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of blood purification using a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) hemofilter.
Methods
We retrospectively examined 54 patients, who were diagnosed with SAP according to the Japanese criteria from January 2011 to December 2019.
Results
Of a total of 54 SAP patients, 26 patients progressively developed AKI and required continuous hemodialysis with a PMMA membrane hemofilter (PMMA-CHD). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score were significantly higher in patients requiring PMMA-CHD than in patients not requiring hemodialysis. The lung injury scores were also significantly higher in patients requiring PMMA-CHD. Of the 26 patients, 16 patients developed ALI/ARDS and required mechanical ventilation. A total of seven patients developed severe ALI/ARDS and received additional intermittent hemodiafiltration using a PMMA hemofilter (PMMA-HDF). Although the length of intensive care unit stay was significantly longer in patients with severe ALI/ARDS, blood purification therapy was discontinued in all the patients. The survival rates at the time of discharge were 92.3% and 92.9% in patients with and without PMMA-CHD, respectively. These real mortality ratios were obviously lower than the estimated mortality ratios predicted by APACHE II scores.
Conclusions
These finding suggest that the blood purification using a PMMA hemofilter would be effective for the treatment of AKI and ALI/ARDS in SAP patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • A Retrospective Study on the Start and End of Continuous Hemodialysis using a Polymethylmethacrylate Hemofilter for Severe Acute Pancreatitis
    Kiyohiko Kinjoh, Ryoji Nagamura, Yutaka Sakuda
    Internal Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the therapeutic efficiency and efficacy of blood purification in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis
    Hongwei Huang, Zhongshi Huang, Menghua Chen, Ken Okamoto, Chiara Lazzeri
    PLOS ONE.2024; 19(1): e0296641.     CrossRef
  • Enhancing Immune Protection in Hemodialysis Patients: Role of the Polymethyl Methacrylate Membrane
    Rossana Franzin, Alessandra Stasi, Gianvito Caggiano, Elena Squiccimarro, Vincenzo Losappio, Marco Fiorentino, Carlo Alfieri, Giovanni Stallone, Loreto Gesualdo, Giuseppe Castellano
    Blood Purification.2023; : 27.     CrossRef
Review Articles
Pulmonary
Awakening in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation
Su Hwan Lee
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):26-34.   Published online February 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2022.00031
  • 4,070 View
  • 243 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Although the rate of lung transplantation (LTx), the last treatment option for end-stage lung disease, is increasing, some patients waiting for LTx need a bridging strategy for LTx due to the limited number of available donor lungs. For a long time, mechanical ventilation has been employed as a bridge to LTx because the outcome of using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridging strategy has been poor. However, the outcome after mechanical ventilation as a bridge to LTx was poor compared with that in patients without bridges. With advances in technology and the accumulation of experience, the outcome of ECMO as a bridge to LTx has improved, and the rate of ECMO use as a bridging strategy has increased over time. However, whether the use of ECMO as a bridge to LTx can achieve survival rates similar to those of non-bridged LTx patients remains controversial. In 2010, one center introduced awake ECMO strategy for LTx bridging, and its use as a bridge to LTx has been showing favorable outcomes to date. Awake ECMO has several advantages, such as maintenance of physical activity, spontaneous breathing, avoidance of endotracheal intubation, and reduced use of sedatives and analgesics, but it may cause serious problems. Nonetheless, several studies have shown that awake ECMO performed by a multidisciplinary team is safe. In cases where ECMO or mechanical ventilation is required due to unavoidable exacerbation in patients awaiting LTx, the application of awake ECMO performed by an appropriately trained ECMO multi-disciplinary team can be useful.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation: Practice patterns and patient outcomes
    Hannah J. Rando, Jonathon P. Fanning, Sung-Min Cho, Bo S. Kim, Glenn Whitman, Errol L. Bush, Steven P. Keller
    The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.2024; 43(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Needing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Following a Critical Course of COVID-19
    Samuel Genzor, Pavol Pobeha, Martin Šimek, Petr Jakubec, Jan Mizera, Martin Vykopal, Milan Sova, Jakub Vaněk, Jan Praško
    Life.2023; 13(4): 1054.     CrossRef
  • Dangers in using beta-blockers in patients with venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
    Diego Rodríguez Álvarez, Elena Pérez-Costa, Juan José Menéndez Suso
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(4): 683.     CrossRef
Neurosurgery
Brain-lung interaction: a vicious cycle in traumatic brain injury
Ariana Alejandra Chacón-Aponte, Érika Andrea Durán-Vargas, Jaime Adolfo Arévalo-Carrillo, Iván David Lozada-Martínez, Maria Paz Bolaño-Romero, Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Pedro Grille, Tariq Janjua
Acute Crit Care. 2022;37(1):35-44.   Published online February 11, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.01193
  • 12,468 View
  • 825 Download
  • 10 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The brain-lung interaction can seriously affect patients with traumatic brain injury, triggering a vicious cycle that worsens patient prognosis. Although the mechanisms of the interaction are not fully elucidated, several hypotheses, notably the “blast injury” theory or “double hit” model, have been proposed and constitute the basis of its development and progression. The brain and lungs strongly interact via complex pathways from the brain to the lungs but also from the lungs to the brain. The main pulmonary disorders that occur after brain injuries are neurogenic pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the principal brain disorders after lung injuries include brain hypoxia and intracranial hypertension. All of these conditions are key considerations for management therapies after traumatic brain injury and need exceptional case-by-case monitoring to avoid neurological or pulmonary complications. This review aims to describe the history, pathophysiology, risk factors, characteristics, and complications of brain-lung and lung-brain interactions and the impact of different old and recent modalities of treatment in the context of traumatic brain injury.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Acute brain injury increases pulmonary capillary permeability via sympathetic activation-mediated high fluid shear stress and destruction of the endothelial glycocalyx layer
    Na Zhao, Chao Liu, Xinxin Tian, Juan Yang, Tianen Wang
    Experimental Cell Research.2024; 434(2): 113873.     CrossRef
  • Oral administration of lysozyme protects against injury of ileum via modulating gut microbiota dysbiosis after severe traumatic brain injury
    Weijian Yang, Caihua Xi, Haijun Yao, Qiang Yuan, Jun Zhang, Qifang Chen, Gang Wu, Jin Hu
    Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Ventilatory targets following brain injury
    Shaurya Taran, Sarah Wahlster, Chiara Robba
    Current Opinion in Critical Care.2023; 29(2): 41.     CrossRef
  • Uncertainty in Neurocritical Care: Recognizing Its Relevance for Clinical Decision Making
    Luis Rafael Moscote-Salazar, William A. Florez-Perdomo, Tariq Janjua
    Indian Journal of Neurotrauma.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Targeted Nanocarriers Co-Opting Pulmonary Intravascular Leukocytes for Drug Delivery to the Injured Brain
    Jia Nong, Patrick M. Glassman, Jacob W. Myerson, Viviana Zuluaga-Ramirez, Alba Rodriguez-Garcia, Alvin Mukalel, Serena Omo-Lamai, Landis R. Walsh, Marco E. Zamora, Xijing Gong, Zhicheng Wang, Kartik Bhamidipati, Raisa Y. Kiseleva, Carlos H. Villa, Colin F
    ACS Nano.2023; 17(14): 13121.     CrossRef
  • Manejo postoperatorio de resección de tumores cerebrales en la unidad de cuidado intensivo
    Andrés Felipe Naranjo Ramírez, Álvaro de Jesús Medrano Areiza, Bryan Arango Sánchez, Juan Carlos Arango Martínez, Luis Fermín Naranjo Atehortúa
    Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modulation of MAPK/NF-κB Pathway and NLRP3 Inflammasome by Secondary Metabolites from Red Algae: A Mechanistic Study
    Asmaa Nabil-Adam, Mohamed L. Ashour, Mohamed Attia Shreadah
    ACS Omega.2023; 8(41): 37971.     CrossRef
  • American Association for the Surgery of Trauma/American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma clinical protocol for management of acute respiratory distress syndrome and severe hypoxemia
    Jason A. Fawley, Christopher J. Tignanelli, Nicole L. Werner, George Kasotakis, Samuel P. Mandell, Nina E. Glass, David J. Dries, Todd W. Costantini, Lena M. Napolitano
    Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery.2023; 95(4): 592.     CrossRef
  • Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, and brain oxygenation in acute brain injury: Friend or foe? A scoping review
    Greta Zunino, Denise Battaglini, Daniel Agustin Godoy
    Journal of Intensive Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The role of cardiac dysfunction and post-traumatic pulmonary embolism in brain-lung interactions following traumatic brain injury
    Mabrouk Bahloul, Karama Bouchaala, Najeh Baccouche, Kamilia Chtara, Hedi Chelly, Mounir Bouaziz
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(2): 266.     CrossRef
  • Allocation of Donor Lungs in Korea
    Hye Ju Yeo
    Journal of Chest Surgery.2022; 55(4): 274.     CrossRef
  • Mapping brain endophenotypes associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis genetic risk
    Ali-Reza Mohammadi-Nejad, Richard J. Allen, Luke M. Kraven, Olivia C. Leavy, R. Gisli Jenkins, Louise V. Wain, Dorothee P. Auer, Stamatios N. Sotiropoulos
    eBioMedicine.2022; 86: 104356.     CrossRef
  • Use of bedside ultrasound in the evaluation of acute dyspnea: a comprehensive review of evidence on diagnostic usefulness
    Ivan David Lozada-Martinez, Isabela Zenilma Daza-Patiño, Gerardo Jesus Farley Reina-González, Sebastián Rojas-Pava, Ailyn Zenith Angulo-Lara, María Paola Carmona-Rodiño, Olga Gissela Sarmiento-Najar, Jhon Mike Romero-Madera, Yesid Alonso Ángel-Hernandez
    Revista Investigación en Salud Universidad de Boyacá.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Pulmonary
The effects of direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber in patients with acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease
Jae Ha Lee, Jin Han Park, Hyo-Jung Kim, Hyun Kuk Kim, Ji Hoon Jang, Yong Kyun Kim, Bong Soo Park, Si Hyung Park, Il Hwan Kim, Se Hun Kim, Woon Heo, Hang-Jea Jang
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):126-132.   Published online April 15, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2021.00073
  • 5,065 View
  • 184 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease (AE-ILD) causes clinically significant deterioration and has an extremely poor prognosis with high mortality. Recently, several studies reported the effectiveness of direct hemoperfusion with a polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column (PMX-DHP) in patients with AE-ILD as a potential therapy. This study describes the clinical effectiveness and safety of PMX-DHP in patients with AE-ILD.
Methods
We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 10 patients (11 episodes) with AE-ILD treated with PMX-DHP from January 2018 to June 2019. We compared laboratory and physiologic data of the ratio of partial pressure arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (P/F ratio) and level of inflammatory markers before and after implementation of PMX-DHP.
Results
Ten patients were included according to the 2016 revised definition of acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Nine patients had IPF and one patient had fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Most patients (90.9%) were treated with a steroid pulse, and four patients (36.4%) were treated with an immunosuppressant. The median number of PMX-DHP cycles was 2, and the median duration of each cycle was 6 hours. After PMX-DHP, the mean P/F ratio improved (86 [range, 63–106] vs. 145 [86–260], P=0.030) and interleukin-6 and c-reactive protein decreased (79 [35–640] vs. 10 [5–25], P=0.018 and 14 [4–21] vs. 5 [2–6], P=0.019, respectively). The 30-day mortality rate was 27.3% and the 90-day mortality rate was 72.7%.
Conclusions
PMX-DHP treatment improved P/F ratio and reduced inflammatory markers in AE-ILD patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Polymyxin B-immobilised fibre column treatment for acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients with mechanical ventilation: a nationwide observational study
    Nobuyasu Awano, Taisuke Jo, Takehiro Izumo, Minoru Inomata, Yu Ito, Kojiro Morita, Hiroki Matsui, Kiyohide Fushimi, Hirokazu Urushiyama, Takahide Nagase, Hideo Yasunaga
    Journal of Intensive Care.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Changes in Oxygenation and Serological Markers in Acute Exacerbation of Interstitial Lung Disease Treated with Polymyxin B Hemoperfusion
    Song-I Lee, Chaeuk Chung, Dongil Park, Da Hyun Kang, Jeong Eun Lee
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2022; 11(9): 2485.     CrossRef
Surgery
Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study
Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2021;36(2):99-108.   Published online April 5, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2020.01144
  • 4,656 View
  • 125 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Lung transplantation (LT) is an accepted therapeutic modality for end-stage lung disease patients. Intensive care unit (ICU) readmission is a risk factor for mortality after LT, for which consistent risk factors have not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated the risk factors for ICU readmission during index hospitalization after LT, particularly regarding the posttransplant condition of LT patients.
Methods
In this retrospective study, we investigated all adult patients undergoing LT between October 2012 and August 2017 at our institution. We collected perioperative data from electronic medical records such as demographics, comorbidities, laboratory findings, ICU readmission, and in-hospital mortality.
Results
We analyzed data for 130 patients. Thirty-two patients (24.6%) were readmitted to the ICU 47 times during index hospitalization. At the initial ICU discharge, the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (odds ratio [OR], 1.464; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.083−1.978; P=0.013) and pH (OR, 0.884; 95% CI, 0.813−0.962; P=0.004; when the pH value increases by 0.01) were related to ICU readmission using multivariable regression analysis and were still significant after adjusting for confounding factors. Thirteen patients (10%) died during the hospitalization period, and the number of ICU readmissions was a significant risk factor for in-hospital mortality. The most common causes of ICU readmission and in-hospital mortality were infection-related.
Conclusions
The SOFA score and pH were associated with increased risk of ICU readmission. Early postoperative management of these factors and thorough posttransplantation infection control can reduce ICU readmission and improve the prognosis of LT patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Cardiothoracic Transplant Anesthesia: Selected Highlights: Part I—Lung Transplantation
    Andrew M. Courtwright, Jagan Devarajan, Ashley Virginia Fritz, Archer Kilbourne Martin, Barbara Wilkey, Sudhakar Subramani, Christopher M. Cassara, Justin N. Tawil, Andrea N. Miltiades, Michael L. Boisen, Brandi A. Bottiger, Angela Pollak, Theresa A. Gelz
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2023; 37(6): 884.     CrossRef
  • Status and Risk Factors in Patients Requiring Unplanned Intensive Care Unit Readmission Within 48 Hours: A Retrospective Propensity-Matched Study in China
    Yan-Ling Yin, Mei-Rong Sun, Kun Zhang, Yu-Hong Chen, Jie Zhang, Shao-Kun Zhang, Li-Li Zhou, Yan-Shuo Wu, Peng Gao, Kang-Kang Shen, Zhen-Jie Hu
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2023; Volume 16: 383.     CrossRef
  • Comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
    Maida Qazi, Mahnoor Amin
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(2): 234.     CrossRef
  • Reply to comment on “Risk factors for intensive care unit readmission after lung transplantation: a retrospective cohort study”
    Hye-Bin Kim, Sungwon Na, Hyo Chae Paik, Hyeji Joo, Jeongmin Kim
    Acute and Critical Care.2023; 38(2): 236.     CrossRef
  • Predicting outcomes, describing complications and optimising rehabilitation in patients undergoing lung transplantation
    Massimiliano Polastri, Gian Maria Paganelli
    International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation.2023; 30(10): 1.     CrossRef
Basic science and research
The effects of BMS-470539 on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury
Eun-A Jang, Jin-Young Kim, Tran Duc Tin, Ji-A Song, Seong-Heon Lee, Sang-Hyun Kwak
Acute Crit Care. 2019;34(2):133-140.   Published online May 31, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2019.00507
  • 7,007 View
  • 162 Download
  • 5 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Overactivation of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, is associated with acute lung injury. BMS-470539 is a selective agonist of melanocortin 1 receptor, which triggers the inhibition of proinflammatory responses, suppressing neutrophil infiltration and protecting tissue. This study evaluated the effects of BMS-470539 on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in a mouse model.
Methods
Mice received a subcutaneous injection of saline or BMS-470539 (18.47 mg/kg) 1 hour before an intratracheal injection of saline or lipopolysaccharide (20 μg). Mice were sacrificed to analyze the severity of pulmonary edema (lung wet-to-dry weight [W/D] ratio) and inflammatory responses (level of leukocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid [BALF]), and neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity). TNF-α activation was also measured in neutrophils from bone marrow. Survival was investigated in a second-hit sepsis mouse model.
Results
BMS-470539 improved sepsis-induced pulmonary edema, as demonstrated by a decreased W/D ratio (5.76%±0.83% to 3.81%±0.86%, P<0.05). The inflammatory response also improved, as shown by decreased levels of leukocytes (551±116 to 357±86×10²/mm³, P<0.05), PMNs (51.52%±16.23% to 18.41%±7.25%, P<0.01), and TNF-α (550±338 to 128±52 pg/ml, P<0.01) in the BALF. BMS-470539 also improved the inflammatory response, as shown by TNF-α levels (850±158 to 423±59 pg/ml, P<0.01) in neutrophils. BMS-470539 downregulated neutrophil infiltration in the lung (myeloperoxidase: 654±98 to 218±89 U/g, P<0.001). Lastly, BMS improved the survival rate (0% to 70%, P<0.01) in a mice multiple organ failure model.
Conclusions
BMS-470539 improved lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury and mortality in mice by affecting the inflammatory response.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Exosomes Derived from ADSCs Attenuate Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury by Delivery of Circ-Fryl and Regulation of the miR-490-3p/SIRT3 Pathway
    Weijun Shen, Xuan Zhao, Shitong Li
    Inflammation.2022; 45(1): 331.     CrossRef
  • Dichotomous Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Pulmonary Barrier Function and Alveolar Fluid Clearance
    Rudolf Lucas, Yalda Hadizamani, Perenlei Enkhbaatar, Gabor Csanyi, Robert W. Caldwell, Harald Hundsberger, Supriya Sridhar, Alice Ann Lever, Martina Hudel, Dipankar Ash, Masuko Ushio-Fukai, Tohru Fukai, Trinad Chakraborty, Alexander Verin, Douglas C. Eato
    Frontiers in Physiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • NDP-MSH treatment recovers marginal lungs during ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP)
    Caterina Lonati, Michele Battistin, Daniele E. Dondossola, Giulia A. Bassani, Daniela Brambilla, Riccardo Merighi, Patrizia Leonardi, Andrea Carlin, Marica Meroni, Alberto Zanella, Anna Catania, Stefano Gatti
    Peptides.2021; 141: 170552.     CrossRef
  • Antifibrotic and Anti-Inflammatory Actions of α-Melanocytic Hormone: New Roles for an Old Player
    Roshan Dinparastisaleh, Mehdi Mirsaeidi
    Pharmaceuticals.2021; 14(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • Activation of Melanocortin Receptors as a Potential Strategy to Reduce Local and Systemic Reactions Induced by Respiratory Viruses
    Caterina Lonati, Stefano Gatti, Anna Catania
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Case Reports
Pulmonary
Right ventricular assist device with an oxygenator using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation in a patient with severe respiratory failure and right heart decompensation
Dong Kyu Oh, Tae Sun Shim, Kyung-Wook Jo, Seung-Il Park, Dong Kwan Kim, Sehoon Choi, Geun Dong Lee, Sung-Ho Jung, Pil-Je Kang, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):117-121.   Published online April 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00416
  • 9,368 View
  • 276 Download
  • 16 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Right heart decompensation is a fatal complication in patients with respiratory failure, particularly in those transitioned to lung transplantation using veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO). In these patients, veno-arterial (V-A ECMO) or veno-arterialvenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-AV ECMO) is used to support both cardiac and respiratory function. However, these processes may increase the risk of device-related complications such as bleeding, thromboembolism, and limb ischemia. In the present case, a 64-year-old male patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis developed respiratory failure and commenced treatment with V-V ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation. Unfortunately, the patient developed right heart decompensation and required both cardiac and respiratory support during treatment with V-V ECMO. Instead of adding arterial cannulation, he was switched to a novel configuration, a right ventricular assist device with an oxygenator (Oxy- RVAD) using ECMO, with drainage cannulation from the femoral vein and return cannulation to the main pulmonary artery. The patient was successfully bridged to lung transplantation without serious complications after 10 days of Oxy-RVAD support. To the best of our knowledge, this is an extreme rare and challenging case of Oxy-RVAD using ECMO in a patient successfully bridged to lung transplantation.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Role of Palliative Care in Cardiovascular Disease
    John Arthur McClung, William H. Frishman, Wilbert S. Aronow
    Cardiology in Review.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Early Mobilization for a Patient With a Right Ventricular Assist Device With an Oxygenator
    Sheena MacFarlane, Vanessa Lee, Adrienne H. Simonds, Samantha Alvarez, Samantha Carty, Kevin H. Ewers, Victoria R. Kelly, Parker Linden, Amanda L. Moskal
    Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy.2023; 14(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • A 35-month-old boy who ingested laundry detergent pods and underwent veno-pulmonary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support
    Hye-ji Han, Bongjin Lee, Won Jin Jang, Ji Won Lee, Jin Hee Kim, Sungkyu Cho, June Dong Park
    Pediatric Emergency Medicine Journal.2023; 10(4): 175.     CrossRef
  • Right Ventricular Assist Device With Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Bridging Right Ventricular Heart Failure to Lung Transplantation: A Single-Center Case Series and Literature Review
    Jae Guk Lee, Chuiyong Pak, Dong Kyu Oh, Ho Cheol Kim, Pil-Je Kang, Geun Dong Lee, Se Hoon Choi, Sung-Ho Jung, Sang-Bum Hong
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2022; 36(6): 1686.     CrossRef
  • Advanced Circulatory Support and Lung Transplantation in Pulmonary Hypertension
    Marie M. Budev, James J. Yun
    Cardiology Clinics.2022; 40(1): 129.     CrossRef
  • A Review of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Treatment in Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Case Series of Adult Patients
    Heather Torbic, Benjamin Hohlfelder, Sudhir Krishnan, Adriano R. Tonelli
    Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics.2022; 27: 107424842110690.     CrossRef
  • A Comprehensive Review of Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices
    Varunsiri Atti, Mahesh Anantha Narayanan, Brijesh Patel, Sudarshan Balla, Aleem Siddique, Scott Lundgren, Poonam Velagapudi
    Heart International.2022; 16(1): 37.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive Monitoring in Patients With Dual Lumen Right Atrium to Pulmonary Artery Right Ventricular Assist Device
    Asad A. Usman, Audrey E. Spelde, Michael Ibrahim, Marisa Cevasco, Christian Bermudez, Emily MacKay, Sameer Khandhar, Wilson Szeto, William Vernick, Jacob Gutsche
    ASAIO Journal.2022; 68(12): 1461.     CrossRef
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    Kelly M. Ivins-O’Keefe, Michael S. Cahill, Arthur R. Mielke, Michal J. Sobieszczyk, Valerie G. Sams, Phillip E. Mason, Matthew D. Read
    ASAIO Journal.2022; 68(12): 1483.     CrossRef
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    Ahmed M El Banayosy, Aly El Banayosy, Joseph M Brewer, Mircea R Mihu, Jaclyn M Chidester, Laura V Swant, Robert S Schoaps, Ammar Sharif, Marc O Maybauer
    The International Journal of Artificial Organs.2022; 45(12): 1006.     CrossRef
  • Critical Care Management of the Patient with Pulmonary Hypertension
    Christopher J. Mullin, Corey E. Ventetuolo
    Clinics in Chest Medicine.2021; 42(1): 155.     CrossRef
  • Successful Lung Transplantation After 213 Days of Extracorporeal Life Support: Role of Oxygenator-Right Ventricular Assist Device
    Jae Kyeom Sim, Kyeongman Jeon, Gee Young Suh, Suryeun Chung, Yang Hyun Cho
    ASAIO Journal.2021; 67(7): e127.     CrossRef
  • Oxy-right Ventricular Assist Device for Bridging of Right Heart Failure to Lung Transplantation
    Sung Kwang Lee, Do Hyung Kim, Woo Hyun Cho, Hye Ju Yeo
    Transplantation.2021; 105(7): 1610.     CrossRef
  • Interventional and Surgical Treatments for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension
    Tomasz Stącel, Magdalena Latos, Maciej Urlik, Mirosław Nęcki, Remigiusz Antończyk, Tomasz Hrapkowicz, Marcin Kurzyna, Marek Ochman
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 10(15): 3326.     CrossRef
  • Intraoperative Management of Adult Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: an Expert Consensus Statement From the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists—Part I, Technical Aspects of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
    Michael A. Mazzeffi, Vidya K. Rao, Jeffrey Dodd-o, Jose Mauricio Del Rio, Antonio Hernandez, Mabel Chung, Amit Bardia, Rebecca M. Bauer, Joseph S. Meltzer, Sree Satyapriya, Raymond Rector, James G. Ramsay, Jacob Gutsche
    Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia.2021; 35(12): 3496.     CrossRef
  • Intraoperative Management of Adult Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: An Expert Consensus Statement From the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists—Part I, Technical Aspects of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
    Michael A. Mazzeffi, Vidya K. Rao, Jeffrey Dodd-o, Jose Mauricio Del Rio, Antonio Hernandez, Mabel Chung, Amit Bardia, Rebecca M. Bauer, Joseph S. Meltzer, Sree Satyapriya, Raymond Rector, James G. Ramsay, Jacob Gutsche
    Anesthesia & Analgesia.2021; 133(6): 1459.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Lung injury associated with inhalation of effective microorganism blends
Jee-min Kim, Yoon Jin Kwak, Ho Il Yoon
Acute Crit Care. 2020;35(2):122-126.   Published online April 8, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00332
  • 9,843 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Since 2009, effective microorganisms (EMs) have been supplied by the local government to the citizens of Seongnam, Korea, for various environment-protective uses including manufacturing detergents, cosmetics and humidifier disinfectants. A 68-year-old man who had placed an EM blends into a humidifier for inhalation visited the emergency room with complaints of fever and dyspnea. He was in a shock state with hypoxia. Chest computed tomography revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities that were dominant in the bilateral upper lobes. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and transbronchial lung biopsy was performed. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis and biopsy findings were consistent with alveolar hemorrhage. All microbiological and virological test results were negative. His symptoms and radiographic opacities had improved markedly after several days of conservative care, and he was discharged healthy after 1 week of hospital stay.
Review Articles
Pulmonary
Critical Care before Lung Transplantation
Jin Gu Lee, Moo Suk Park, Su Jin Jeong, Song Yee Kim, Sungwon Na, Jeongmin Kim, Hyo Chae Paik
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(4):197-205.   Published online November 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00367
  • 7,746 View
  • 251 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Lung transplantation is widely accepted as the only viable treatment option for patients with end-stage lung disease. However, the imbalance between the number of suitable donor lungs available and the number of possible candidates often results in intensive care unit (ICU) admission for the latter. In the ICU setting, critical care is essential to keep these patients alive and to successfully bridge to lung transplantation. Proper management in the ICU is also one of the key factors supporting long-term success following transplantation. Critical care includes the provision of respiratory support such as mechanical ventilation (MV) and extracorporeal life support (ECLS). Accordingly, a working knowledge of the common critical care issues related to these unique patients and the early recognition and management of problems that arise before and after transplantation in the ICU setting are crucial for long-term success. In this review, we discuss the management and selection of candidates for lung transplantation as well as existing respiratory support strategies that involve MV and ECLS in the ICU setting.

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  • Optimizing the prelung transplant candidate
    John Pagteilan, Scott Atay
    Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation.2024; 29(1): 37.     CrossRef
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    Su Hwan Lee
    Acute and Critical Care.2022; 37(1): 26.     CrossRef
  • Recipient Management before Lung Transplantation
    Hyoung Soo Kim, Sunghoon Park
    Journal of Chest Surgery.2022; 55(4): 265.     CrossRef
  • Outcomes of Patients on the Lung Transplantation Waitlist in Korea: A Korean Network for Organ Sharing Data Analysis
    Hye Ju Yeo, Dong Kyu Oh, Woo Sik Yu, Sun Mi Choi, Kyeongman Jeon, Mihyang Ha, Jin Gu Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Young Tae Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long- and short-term clinical impact of awake extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as bridging therapy for lung transplantation
    Nam Eun Kim, Ala Woo, Song Yee Kim, Ah Young Leem, Youngmok Park, Se Hyun Kwak, Seung Hyun Yong, Kyungsoo Chung, Moo Suk Park, Young Sam Kim, Ha Eun Kim, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Su Hwan Lee
    Respiratory Research.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Critical Care after Lung Transplantation
Song Yee Kim, Su Jin Jeong, Jin Gu Lee, Moo Suk Park, Hyo Chae Paik, Sungwon Na, Jeongmin Kim
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(4):206-215.   Published online November 30, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00360
  • 15,878 View
  • 631 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the first successful lung transplantation in 1983, there have been many advances in the field. Nevertheless, the latest data from the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation revealed that the risk of death from transplantation is 9%. Various aspects of postoperative management, including mechanical ventilation, could affect intensive care unit stay, hospital stay, and immediate postoperative morbidity and mortality. Complications such as reperfusion injury, graft rejection, infection, and dehiscence of anastomosis increase fatal adverse side effects immediately after surgery. In this article, we review the possible immediate complications after lung transplantation and summarize current knowledge on prevention and treatment.

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  • Aspergillus Galactomannan Titer as a Diagnostic Marker of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Lung Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Retrospective Cohort Study
    Eun-Young Kim, Seung-Hyun Yong, Min-Dong Sung, A-La Woo, Young-Mok Park, Ha-Eun Kim, Su-Jin Jung, Song-Yee Kim, Jin-Gu Lee, Young-Sam Kim, Hyo-Chae Paik, Moo-Suk Park
    Journal of Fungi.2023; 9(5): 527.     CrossRef
  • Nontuberculous mycobacterial infection after lung transplantation: A single-center experience in South Korea
    Youngmok Park, Nam Eun Kim, Se Hyun Kwak, Moo Suk Park, Su Jin Jeong, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Song Yee Kim, Young Ae Kang
    Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection.2022; 55(1): 123.     CrossRef
  • Medical Complications of Lung Transplantation
    Moo Suk Park
    Journal of Chest Surgery.2022; 55(4): 338.     CrossRef
  • Roles of electrical impedance tomography in lung transplantation
    Hui Jiang, Yijiao Han, Xia Zheng, Qiang Fang
    Frontiers in Physiology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perioperative anidulafungin combined with triazole prophylaxis for the prevention of early invasive candidiasis in lung transplant recipients
    Emily Sartain, Kelly Schoeppler, Barrett Crowther, Joshua B. Smith, Maheen Z. Abidi, Todd J. Grazia, Mark Steele, Terri Gleason, Krista Porter, Alice Gray
    Transplant Infectious Disease.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Prediction and Prognosis of Fungal Infection in Lung Transplant Recipients—A Retrospective Cohort Study in South Korea
    Yae-Jee Baek, Yun-Suk Cho, Moo-Hyun Kim, Jong-Hoon Hyun, Yu-Jin Sohn, Song-Yee Kim, Su-Jin Jeong, Moo-Suk Park, Jin-Gu Lee, Hyo-Chae Paik
    Journal of Fungi.2021; 7(8): 639.     CrossRef
  • Panel-Reactive and Donor-Specific Antibodies before Lung Transplantation can Affect Outcomes in Korean Patients Receiving Lung Transplantation
    Sung Woo Moon, Moo Suk Park, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Young Tae Kim, Hyun Joo Lee, Samina Park, Sun Mi Choi, Do Hyung Kim, Woo Hyun Cho, Hye Ju Yeo, Seung-il Park, Se Hoon Choi, Sang-Bum Hong, Tae Sun Shim, Kyung-Wook Jo, Kyeongman Jeon, Byeong-Ho Jeong
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2020; 61(7): 606.     CrossRef
  • A proof-of principal study using phase-contrast imaging for the detection of large airway pathologies after lung transplantation
    Stephan Umkehrer, Carmela Morrone, Julien Dinkel, Laura Aigner, Maximilian F. Reiser, Julia Herzen, Ali Ö. Yildirim, Franz Pfeiffer, Katharina Hellbach
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
Basic science and research
Anti-inflammatory Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in an Acute Lung Injury Mouse Model
Jin Won Huh, Won Young Kim, Yun Young Park, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Mi-Jung Kim, Sang-Bum Hong
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):154-161.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00619
  • 5,695 View
  • 184 Download
  • 9 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attenuate injury in various lung injury models through paracrine effects. We hypothesized that intratracheal transplantation of allogenic MSCs could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice, mediated by anti-inflammatory responses.
Methods
Six-week-old male mice were randomized to either the control or the ALI group. ALI was induced by intratracheal LPS instillation. Four hours after LPS instillation, MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline was randomly intratracheally administered. Neutrophil count and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); lung histology; levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2; and the expression of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), caspase-3, and caspase-9 were evaluated at 48 hours after injury.
Results
Treatment with MSCs attenuated lung injury in ALI mice by decreasing protein level and neutrophil recruitment into the BALF and improving the histologic change. MSCs also decreased the protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, but had little effect on the protein expression of PCNA, caspase-3, and caspase-9.
Conclusions
Intratracheal injection of bone marrow-derived allogenic MSCs attenuates LPSinduced ALI via immunomodulatory effects.

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  • The Effectiveness of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Mixed with Platelet-Rich Plasma in the Healing of Inflammatory Bowel Anastomoses: A Pre-Clinical Study in Rats
    Georgios Geropoulos, Kyriakos Psarras, Maria Papaioannou, Vasileios Geropoulos, Argyri Niti, Christina Nikolaidou, Georgios Koimtzis, Nikolaos Symeonidis, Efstathios T. Pavlidis, Georgios Koliakos, Theodoros E. Pavlidis, Ioannis Galanis
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2024; 14(1): 121.     CrossRef
  • Cyclic Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Primed Mesenchymal Stem Cells Ameliorate LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice
    Youngheon Park, Jimin Jang, Jooyeon Lee, Hyosin Baek, Jaehyun Park, Sang-Ryul Cha, Se Bi Lee, Sunghun Na, Jae-Woo Kwon, Seok-Ho Hong, Se-Ran Yang
    International Journal of Stem Cells.2023; 16(2): 191.     CrossRef
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    Maryam Yousefi Dehbidi, Nima Goodarzi, Mohammad H. Azhdari, Mohammad Doroudian
    Reviews in Medical Virology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Stem Cell‐based therapies for COVID‐19‐related acute respiratory distress syndrome
    Hoi Wa Ngai, Dae Hong Kim, Mohamed Hammad, Margarita Gutova, Karen Aboody, Christopher D. Cox
    Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.2022; 26(9): 2483.     CrossRef
  • Development of a physiomimetic model of acute respiratory distress syndrome by using ECM hydrogels and organ-on-a-chip devices
    Esther Marhuenda, Alvaro Villarino, Maria Narciso, Linda Elowsson, Isaac Almendros, Gunilla Westergren-Thorsson, Ramon Farré, Núria Gavara, Jorge Otero
    Frontiers in Pharmacology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Chang Liu, Kun Xiao, Lixin Xie
    Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Auxiliary role of mesenchymal stem cells as regenerative medicine soldiers to attenuate inflammatory processes of severe acute respiratory infections caused by COVID-19
    Peyvand Parhizkar Roudsari, Sepideh Alavi-Moghadam, Moloud Payab, Forough Azam Sayahpour, Hamid Reza Aghayan, Parisa Goodarzi, Fereshteh Mohamadi-jahani, Bagher Larijani, Babak Arjmand
    Cell and Tissue Banking.2020; 21(3): 405.     CrossRef
  • The Role of MSC Therapy in Attenuating the Damaging Effects of the Cytokine Storm Induced by COVID-19 on the Heart and Cardiovascular System
    Georgina M. Ellison-Hughes, Liam Colley, Katie A. O'Brien, Kirsty A. Roberts, Thomas A. Agbaedeng, Mark D. Ross
    Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Pulmonary
Feasibility of Immediate in-Intensive Care Unit Pulmonary Rehabilitation after Lung Transplantation: A Single Center Experience
Joo Han Song, Ji-Eun Park, Sang Chul Lee, Sarang Kim, Dong Hyung Lee, Eun Kyoung Kim, Song Yee Kim, Ji Cheol Shin, Jin Gu Lee, Hyo Chae Paik, Moo Suk Park
Acute Crit Care. 2018;33(3):146-153.   Published online August 31, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/acc.2018.00129
  • 5,886 View
  • 142 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Physical function may influence perioperative outcomes of lung transplantation. We investigated the feasibility of a pulmonary rehabilitation program initiated in the immediate postoperative period at an intensive care unit (ICU) for patients who underwent lung transplantation.
Methods
We retrospectively evaluated 22 patients who received pulmonary rehabilitation initiated in the ICU within 2 weeks after lung transplantation at our institution from March 2015 to February 2016. Levels of physical function were graded at the start of pulmonary rehabilitation and then weekly throughout rehabilitation according to criteria from our institutional pulmonary rehabilitation program: grade 1, bedside (G1); grade 2, dangling (G2); grade 3, standing (G3); and grade IV, gait (G4).
Results
The median age of patients was 53 years (range, 25 to 73 years). Fourteen patients (64%) were males. The initial level of physical function was G1 in nine patients, G2 in seven patients, G3 in four patients, and G4 in two patients. Patients started pulmonary rehabilitation at a median of 7.5 days (range, 1 to 29 days) after lung transplantation. We did not observe any rehabilitation-related complications during follow-up. The final level of physical function was G1 in six patients, G3 in two patients, and G4 in 14 patients. Fourteen of the 22 patients were able to walk with or without assistance, and 13 of them maintained G4 until discharge; the eight remaining patients never achieved G4.
Conclusions
Our results suggest the feasibility of early pulmonary rehabilitation initiated in the ICU within a few days after lung transplantation.

Citations

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  • Post-operative, inpatient rehabilitation after lung transplant evaluation (PIRATE): A feasibility randomized controlled trial
    Benjamin J Tarrant, Elizabeth Quinn, Rebecca Robinson, Megan Poulsen, Louise Fuller, Greg Snell, Bruce R Thompson, Brenda M Button, Anne E Holland
    Physiotherapy Theory and Practice.2023; 39(7): 1406.     CrossRef
  • Early Gait Function After Lung Transplantation in Patients With and Without Pretransplant Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support
    Junghwa Do, Hyojin Lim, Kyung Cheon Seo, Suyoung Park, HyeRin Joo, Junghoon Lee, Eunjae Ko, Jaehwal Lim, Ho Cheol Kim, Dongkyu Oh, Sang-Bum Hong, Won Kim
    Transplantation Proceedings.2023; 55(3): 616.     CrossRef
Pulmonary
The Use of Lung Ultrasound in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit
Hyung Koo Kang, Hyo Jin So, Deok Hee Kim, Hyeon-Kyoung Koo, Hye Kyeong Park, Sung-Soon Lee, Hoon Jung
Korean J Crit Care Med. 2017;32(4):323-332.   Published online November 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.4266/kjccm.2017.00318
  • 7,534 View
  • 249 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Background
Pulmonary complications including pneumonia and pulmonary edema frequently develop in critically ill surgical patients. Lung ultrasound (LUS) is increasingly used as a powerful diagnostic tool for pulmonary complications. The purpose of this study was to report how LUS is used in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU).
Methods
This study retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 67 patients who underwent LUS in surgical ICU between May 2016 and December 2016.
Results
The indication for LUS included hypoxemia (n = 44, 65.7%), abnormal chest radiographs without hypoxemia (n = 17, 25.4%), fever without both hypoxemia and abnormal chest radiographs (n = 4, 6.0%), and difficult weaning (n = 2, 3.0%). Among 67 patients, 55 patients were diagnosed with pulmonary edema (n = 27, 41.8%), pneumonia (n = 20, 29.9%), diffuse interstitial pattern with anterior consolidation (n = 6, 10.9%), pneumothorax with effusion (n = 1, 1.5%), and diaphragm dysfunction (n = 1, 1.5%), respectively, via LUS. LUS results did not indicate lung complications for 12 patients. Based on the location of space opacification on the chest radiographs, among 45 patients with bilateral abnormality and normal findings, three (6.7%) and two (4.4%) patients were finally diagnosed with pneumonia and atelectasis, respectively. Furthermore, among 34 patients with unilateral abnormality and normal findings, two patients (5.9%) were finally diagnosed with pulmonary edema. There were 27 patients who were initially diagnosed with pulmonary edema via LUS. This diagnosis was later confirmed by other tests. There were 20 patients who were initially diagnosed with pneumonia via LUS. Among them, 16 and 4 patients were finally diagnosed with pneumonia and atelectasis, respectively.
Conclusions
LUS is useful to detect pulmonary complications including pulmonary edema and pneumonia in surgically ill patients.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill
    Jin Sun Cho
    The Korean Journal of Critical Care Medicine.2017; 32(4): 356.     CrossRef

ACC : Acute and Critical Care